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Frank's Shop

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I taught English for 35 years; ran three English departments;am an A level and GCSE examiner; wrote the teacher and student support materials for OCR English Literature A level and have had books published by OUP and CUP.

I taught English for 35 years; ran three English departments;am an A level and GCSE examiner; wrote the teacher and student support materials for OCR English Literature A level and have had books published by OUP and CUP.
COMMA SPLICING and how to avoid it: full stops and commas
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COMMA SPLICING and how to avoid it: full stops and commas

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Comma splicing - using a comma instead of a full stop - drives GCSE English examiners crazy. This resource explains how to avoid comma splicing, as well as the correct use of commas and full stops. It contains simple exercises for students. Successfully used in classrooms!
Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Translated into Clear, Modern English - full text
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Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Translated into Clear, Modern English - full text

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The whole text of Dr J&H, translated into clear, modern English for GCSE English Literature. Acclaimed by NATE review and applauded by students. Keeps all the excitement of Stevenson’s original. With detailed notes on context and theme and language for GCSE English Literature. By Frank Danes, published author of Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press and GCSE English Literature examiner.
British and American English Vocab & Spelling
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British and American English Vocab & Spelling

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Explains the main differences between British and American spelling and vocabulary. Useful for English Language A level, AS level, GCSE and TEFL students, especially those confused by the differences between American and British English! Successfully used with EAL Chinese students in Cambridge, who said they found it very useful, interesting and helpful.
REVISION and CONTEXT for AN INSPECTOR CALLS
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REVISION and CONTEXT for AN INSPECTOR CALLS

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Everything your students will need to revise AN INSPECTOR CALLS for GCSE English Literature: how to write about context; family units; gender roles; the Conservative Party of the period; the Labour Party of the period; revision and exam technique; how to write about style (to answer the question, “How does Priestley do X Y and Z in the play?”). 8 pages, 2400 word resource.
THE FLEA line by line analysis + qs
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THE FLEA line by line analysis + qs

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Line by line explanation/close analysis of THE FLEA by John Donne. For lower to high grade A level candidates. Includes questions and historical background. Successfully used with students, who found it very useful.
ESOL Ukrainian refugees and others - beginners/elementary pack
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ESOL Ukrainian refugees and others - beginners/elementary pack

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Useful resources to get beginners in English started! Used successfully with Ukrainian refugees and others in 2022-23. Pack includes: describe yourself (dialogue practice); in the cafe; in the pub; going to the dentist; supermarket vocab; history of the English language and comprehension.
How to get TOP MARKS in AQA Eng Lit GCSE
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How to get TOP MARKS in AQA Eng Lit GCSE

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Top tips for students from an AQA GCSE Eng Lit examiner and a former Head of English with 36 years of teaching experience: how to maximise your marks in the Eng Lit AQA GCSE. A guide for students and a series of lessons. How to: plan; stick to the timings; use quotations; write about context; write a paragraph; satisfy the AOs; detailed breakdowns of how to answer each question - prose, poetry, unseen poetry, plays; how to write about style (“How is it written?”); how to punctuate quotations. This is both a set of notes for your students and a set of lesson plans: take your students through these notes to create a series of lessons; excellent for revision! Used by over 1000 students in different schools. 27 pages, 8000 words.
Context and revision LORD OF THE FLIES
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Context and revision LORD OF THE FLIES

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Student notes and lesson plans: exam technique; context (“Coral Island”, Golding a teacher); themes - original sin; WW2 background; Golding on themes and characters; human nature as theme; why are there no girls in the novel?; what Golding himself has said about the novel and the film adaptation; detailed study of individual chapters. This is both a set of notes for students and a series of lessons - take your students through these notes and use them as a basis of discussion. Excellent for revision and study of the context. 7 pages, 2368 words.
Revise MACBETH for more able GCSE students: context, themes, extension
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Revise MACBETH for more able GCSE students: context, themes, extension

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Lesson plans and student notes on: exam technique; themes - regicide, the natural order, witches/the supernatural; tragedy, tragic hero, free will, fate, Fortune. This is both a set of notes for your students and a series of lesson plans: take them through the notes, use them as a basis for discussion. Excellent for context and extension work for higher ability students. 17 pages, 5926 words. Used by over 300 students.
UN SECRET French A level notes for students
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UN SECRET French A level notes for students

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DETAILED notes for students on Grimbert’s UN SECRET: teachers - use as a bases for lessons. Covers: themes; guilt; identity; history/context; motifs; l’occupation; storytelling; form and structure of the novel; Laval; treachery; motifs of dogs, the body and bodies. History covered - occupied France, Laval, the Holocaust. This resource is in English. 2994 words, 7 sides. Successfully used with A level French students.
HANDMAID'S TALE demythologised dystopia
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HANDMAID'S TALE demythologised dystopia

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This new reading of “The Handmaid’s Tale” puts the novel into the context of feminism in the 1980s and the dystopian novel. This article is ideal for the Dystopia option of OCR English Literature A level. The article considers"The Handmaid’s Tale"'s reputation as a cult novel, as a satire of male power and Christianity and the debt it owes to Orwell’s “1984”. Attwood’s prose and structure are analysed. The author argues that “The Handmaid’s Tale” is not the greatest novel of the twentieth century or the greatest dystopian novel: it is a fine novel, written in excellent prose, but it has flaws. This article will help to engage your A level students and to give them something to argue with or against. It will thus encourage them, as the A level specifications require, to engage with critical views rather than simply to read them passively. It is written by Frank Danes, who wrote many of the materials to support OCR English Literature A level on the OCR website; Danes taught English for 30 years in English secondary schools and was Head of English in three schools.
MACBETH the plot in diagram form
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MACBETH the plot in diagram form

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Presents the plot of MACBETH as a diagram, so students can understand the play before they start to read it. Go over it with your students and TEFL students to help them to understand the plot before they start to study the play. Successfully used with over 100 students, including Chinese nationals learning English.
14 qs on "Odour of Chrysanthemums" GCSE Lit text
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14 qs on "Odour of Chrysanthemums" GCSE Lit text

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Excellent for less able and TEFL students: 14 qs testing understanding and appreciation of “Odour…”. As used by students. Go over the answers with your students to create a lesson. Excellent writing and literature practice.
Why does Shakespeare use poetry in "Romeo and Juliet"?
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Why does Shakespeare use poetry in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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This resource answers students’ question, “Why does Shakespeare write in poetry? It’s not realistic.” It enables students to understand verse, prose, iambic pentameter, rhyming couplets within and at the ends of scenes. Excellent material for “How does Shakespeare write?”, context questions and historical context.
Romeo and Juliet's first meeting - help with context and language
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Romeo and Juliet's first meeting - help with context and language

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The lovers’ first meeting is packed with difficult Christian concepts and witty language. R&J’s lines are carefully broken down for students and explained. There is also a bonus exercise in the style of the WJEC context question. A very helpful resource for students who struggle with Shakespeare’s language and the Christian context of the play. Different ways of playing the scene are also explained.
A level notes on NOTES ON A SCANDAL
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A level notes on NOTES ON A SCANDAL

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1500 words of A level notes on Heller’s great novel, by a senior A level examiner and a former Head of English. Themes, viewpoint, dramatic irony, unreliable narrator, reader’s experience, characterisation all covered. This resource can be given straight to students or used to teach from.
Quick guide DESCRIPTIVE WRITING for GCSE/KS3
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Quick guide DESCRIPTIVE WRITING for GCSE/KS3

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A quick and easy diagram for how to do descriptive writing for GCSE: point of view, personification, atmosphere, microscopic focus, mood and emotion, sensuous imagery. Use this resource to discuss different ways of creative writing with your students and to remind them of how they might include different forms of creative writing for GCSE and KS3. Successfully used with over 1000 students!
THE TEMPEST - a diagram of the plot
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THE TEMPEST - a diagram of the plot

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A diagram of THE TEMPEST’s plot, to introduce students to the play before they start studying it. Teacher goes over the story with students; students could then write out the plot as a written exercise. Successfully used with over 100 students, who find it very helpful to have the basic story of the play explained to them before they study it.