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I'm a secondary school maths teacher with a passion for creating high quality resources. All of my complete lesson resources come as single powerpoint files, so everything you need is in one place. Slides have a clean, unfussy layout and I'm not big on plastering learning objectives or acronyms everywhere. My aim is to incorporate interesting, purposeful activities that really make pupils think. I have a website coming soon!

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I'm a secondary school maths teacher with a passion for creating high quality resources. All of my complete lesson resources come as single powerpoint files, so everything you need is in one place. Slides have a clean, unfussy layout and I'm not big on plastering learning objectives or acronyms everywhere. My aim is to incorporate interesting, purposeful activities that really make pupils think. I have a website coming soon!
Averages - mean, median and mode
danwalker

Averages - mean, median and mode

(0)
A complete lesson for introducing mean, median and mode for a list of data. Activities included: Mini whiteboard questions to check pupil understanding of the basic methods. A worksheet of straight forward questions. Mini whiteboard questions with a progression in difficulty, to build up the skills required to do some problem solving... A worksheet of more challenging questions, where pupils are given some of the averages of a set of data, and they have to work out what the raw data is. Some final questions to stimulate discussion about the relative merits of each average. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review it if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Bearings
danwalker

Bearings

(2)
A complete lesson on introducing 3-figure bearings. Activities included: Starter: A quick set of questions to remind pupils of supplementary angles. Main: A quick puzzle to get pupils thinking about compass points. Slides to introduce compass points, the compass and 3-figure bearings. Examples and questions for pupils to try on finding bearings fro m diagrams. A set of worksheets with a progression in difficulty, from correctly measuring bearings and scale drawings to using angle rules to find bearings. Includes some challenging questions involving three points, that should promote discussion about different approaches to obtaining an answer. Plenary: A prompt to discuss how the bearings of A from B and B from A are connected. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Trigonometry - SOHCAHTOA in context
danwalker

Trigonometry - SOHCAHTOA in context

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A set of questions in real-life scenarios, where pupils use SOHCAHTOA to find angles an distances. Activities included: Starter: Some basic SOHCAHTOA questions to test whether pupils can use the rules. Main: A set of eight questions in context. Includes a mix of angle of elevation and angle of depression questions, in a range of contexts. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Trigonometry - SOHCAHTOA finding sides
danwalker

Trigonometry - SOHCAHTOA finding sides

(0)
A complete lesson on using sin, cos and tan to find an unknown side of a right-angled triangle. Designed to come after pupils have been introduced to the trig ratios, and used them to find angles in right-angled triangles. Please see my other resources for complete lessons on these topics. Activities included: Starter: A quick reminder and some questions about using formulae triangles (e.g. the speed, distance, time triangle). This is to help pupils to transfer the same idea to the SOHCAHTOA formulae triangles. Main: A few examples and questions for pupils to try, on finding a side given one side and an angle. Initially, this is done without reference to SOHCAHTOA or formulae triangles, so that pupils need to think about whether to multiply or divide. More examples, but this time using formulae triangles. A worksheet with a progression in difficulty, building up to some challenging questions on finding perimeters of right-angled triangles, given one side and an angle. A tough extension, where pupils try to find lengths for the sides of a triangle with a given angle, so that it is has a perimeter of 20cm. Plenary: A prompt to get pupils thinking about how they are going to remember the rules and methods for this topic. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Fibonacci sequences
danwalker

Fibonacci sequences

(2)
A complete lesson with the 9-1 GCSE Maths specification in mind. Activities included: Starter: Some recap questions on solving two-step linear equations (needed later in the lesson). Main: An introduction to Fibonacci sequences, followed by a quick activity where pupils extend Fibonacci sequences. A challenging, rich task, inspired by one of TES user scottyknowles18’s excellent sequences rich tasks. Pupils try to come up with Fibonacci sequences that fit different criteria (eg that the 4th term is 10). Great for encouraging creativity and discussion. A related follow up activity where pupils try to find missing numbers in given Fibonacci sequences, initially by trial and error, but then following some explanation, by forming and solving linear equations. Extension - a slightly harder version of the follow up activity. Plenary: A look at an alternative algebraic method for finding missing numbers. Some slides could be printed as worksheets, although it’s not strictly necessary. Answers to most tasks included, but not the open-ended rich task. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Using  nth term rules
danwalker

Using nth term rules

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A complete lesson on finding a term given its a position and vice-versa. Activities included: Starter: Recap questions on using an nth term rule to generate the first few terms in a linear sequence. Main: Short, simple task of using an nth term rule to find a term given its position. Harder task where pupils find the position of a given term, by solving a linear equation. Plenary: A question to get pupils thinking about how they could prove if a number was a term in a sequence. No worksheets required, and answers are included. Please review it if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Improper fractions and mixed numbers
danwalker

Improper fractions and mixed numbers

(1)
A complete lesson for first teaching what mixed numbers and improper fractions are, and how to switch between the two forms. Activities included: Starter: Some quick questions to test if pupils can find remainders when dividing. Main: Some examples and a worksheet on identifying mixed numbers and improper fractions from a pictorial representation. Examples and quick questions for pupils to try, on how to convert a mixed number into an improper fraction. A set of straight forward questions for pupils to work on, with an extension task for those who finish. Examples and quick questions for pupils to try, on how to simplify an improper fraction. A set of straight forward questions for pupils to work on, with a challenging extension task for those who finish. Plenary: A final question looking at the options when simplifying improper fractions with common factors. Worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Connected ratios
danwalker

Connected ratios

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A complete lesson on connected ratios, with the 9-1 GCSE in mind. The lesson is focused on problems where, for example, the ratios a:b and b:c are given, and pupils have to find the ratio a:b:c in its simplest form. Assumes pupils have already learned how to generate equivalent ratios and share in a ratio- see my other resources for lessons on these topics. Activities included: Starter: A set of questions to recap equivalent ratios. Main: A brief look at ratios in baking, to give context to the topic. Examples and quick questions for pupils to try. Questions are in the style shown in the cover image. A set of questions for pupils to consolidate. A challenging extension task where pupils combine the techniques learned with sharing in a ratio to solve more complex word problems in context. Plenary: A final puzzle in a different context (area), that could be solved using connected ratios and should stimulate some discussion. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Gradient of a line
danwalker

Gradient of a line

(1)
A complete lesson with examples and activities on calculating gradients of lines and drawing lines with a required gradient. Printable worksheets and answers included. Could also be used before teaching the gradient and intercept method for plotting a straight line given its equation. Please review it if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Bearings with trigonometry
danwalker

Bearings with trigonometry

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A complete lesson on bearings problems with an element of trigonometry or Pythagoras’ theorem. Activities included: Starter: Two sets of questions, one to remind pupils of basic bearings, the other a matching activity to remind pupils of basic trigonometry and Pythagoras’ thoerem. Main: Three worked examples to show the kind of things required. A set of eight problems for pupils to work through. Plenary: A prompt for pupils to reflect on the skills used during the lesson. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Circle theorems lesson 1
danwalker

Circle theorems lesson 1

(1)
A complete lesson on the theorem that the angle at the centre is twice the angle at the circumference. For me, this is definitely the first theorem to teach as it can be derived using ideas pupils have already covered. and then used to derive some of the other theorems. I will shortly be uploading lessons for the other theorems. Activities included: Starter: A few basic questions to check pupils can find missing angles in triangles. Main: A short discovery activity where pupils split the classic diagram for this theorem into isosceles triangles (see cover image). If you think this could overload pupils, it could be skipped, although I think if they can’t cope with this activity, they’re not ready for circle theorems! A link to the mathspad free tool for this topic. I hope mathspad don’t mind me putting this link - I will remove it if they do. A large set of mini-whiteboard questions for pupils to try. These have been designed with a variation element as well as non-examples, to really make sure pupils think about the features of the diagrams. A worksheet for pupils to consolidate independently, with two possible extension tasks: (1) pupils creating their own examples and non-examples, (2) pupils attempting a proof of the theorem. Plenary: A final set of six diagrams, where pupils have to decide if the theorem applies. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Perimeter
danwalker

Perimeter

(0)
A complete lesson on perimeter, with a strong problem solving element. Incorporate a set of on-trend-minimally-different questions and several opportunities for pupils to generate their own questions. Also incorporates area elements, to deliberately challenge the misconception of confusing the two properties of area and perimeter. Activities included: Starter: A few basic perimeter questions, to check pupils know what perimeter is. Main: Pupils come up with a variety of shapes with the same perimeter, then discuss answers with partners. Designed to get pupils thinking about which answers could be different, and which must be the same. A slight variation for the next activity - pupils are given diagrams of pentominoes (ie same area) and work out their perimeters. Raises some interesting questions about when perimeter varies, and when it doesn’t. A third activity based on diagrams a bit like the cover image. Using shapes made from different arrangements of identical rectangles, pupils work out the perimeters of increasingly elaborate shapes, some of which can’t be done. Questions have been designed so that only slight alterations have been made from one diagram to the next, but the resulting perimeter calculations are varied, interesting and sometimes surprising (IMO!). Has the potential to be extended by pupils creating their own shapes and trying to work out when it is possible to calculate the perimeter. Plenary: A closer look at the impossible questions, using a couple of different methods. Printable worksheets and answers included, where appropriate. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Trigonometry - 3D problems
danwalker

Trigonometry - 3D problems

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A complete lesson on using SOHCAHTOA and Pythagoras’ theorem with problems in three dimensions. Activities included: Starter: A set of recap questions on basic SOHCAHTOA and Pythagoras. Main: Examples and questions to dscuss, on visualising distances and angles within cuboids and triangular prisms, and understanding the wording of exam questions on this topic. Examples and quick questions for pupils to try, on finding the angle of a space diagonal. A worksheet, in three sections (I print this, including the starter, two per page, two sided so that you have a single page handout), with a progression in difficulty. Starts with finding the space diagonal of a cuboid, where the triangle pupils will need to use has been drawn already. The second section looks at angles in a triangular prism, and pupils will need to draw the relevant triangles themselves. The third section has exam-style questions, where pupils will need to identify the correct angle by interpreting the wording of the question. (eg “find the angle between the diagonal AE and the plane ABCD”). An extension task looking at the great pyramid of Giza. Plenary: A final question to add a bit more depth, looking at the most steep and least steep angles up a ramp. Printable worksheets and worked answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Circle theorems lesson 3
danwalker

Circle theorems lesson 3

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A complete lesson on the theorem that angles in the same segment are equal. I always teach the theorem that the angle at the centre is twice the angle at the circumference first (see my other resources for a lesson on that theorem), as it can be used to easily prove the same segment theorem. Activities included: Starter: Some basic questions on the theorems that the angle at the centre is twice the angle at the circumference, and that the angle in a semi-circle is 90 degrees, to check pupils remember them. Main: Slides to show what a chord, major segment and minor segment are, and to show what it means to say that two angles are in the same segment. This is followed up by instructions for pupils to construct the usual diagram for this theorem, to further consolidate their understanding of the terminology and get them to investigate what happens to the angle. A ‘no words’ proof of the theorem, using the theorem that the angle at the centre is twice the angle at the circumference. Missing angle examples of the theorem, that could be used as questions for pupils to try. These include more interesting variations that incorporate other angle rules. A set of similar questions with a progression in difficulty, for pupils to consolidate. Two extension questions. Plenary: A final set of six diagrams, where pupils have to decide if two angles match, either because of the theorem learnt in the lesson or because of another angle rule. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please do review if you buy as any feedback is greatly appreciated!
Circle theorems lesson 6
danwalker

Circle theorems lesson 6

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A complete lesson on the alternate segment theorem. Assumes pupils can already use the theorems that: The angle at the centre is twice the angle at the circumference The angle in a semicircle is 90 degrees Angles in the same same segment are equal .Opposite angles in a cyclic quadrilateral sum to 180 degrees A tangent is perpendicular to a radius so that more varied questions can be asked. Please see my other resources for lessons on these theorems. Activities included: Starter: Some basic questions to check pupils know what the word subtend means. Main: Animated slides to define what an alternate segment is. An example where the angle in the alternate segment is found without reference to the theorem (see cover image), followed by three similar questions for pupils to try. I’ve done this because if pupils can follow these steps, they can prove the theorem. However this element of the lesson could be bypassed or used later, depending on the class. Multiple choice questions where pupils simply have to identify which angles match as a result of the theorem. In my experience, they always struggle to identify the correct angle, so these questions really help. Seven examples of finding missing angles using the theorem (plus a second theorem for most of them). A set of eight similar problems for pupils to consolidate. An extension with two variations -an angle chase of sorts. Plenary: An animation of the proof without words, the intention being that pupils try to describe the steps. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy, as any feedback is appreciated.
Circle theorems lesson 2
danwalker

Circle theorems lesson 2

(0)
A complete lesson on the theorem that the angle in a semicircle is 90 degrees. I always teach the theorem that the angle at the centre is twice the angle at the circumference first (see my other resources for a lesson on that theorem), as it can be used to easily prove the semicircle theorem. Activities included: Starter: Some basic questions on the theorem that the angle at the centre is twice the angle at the circumference, to check pupils remember it. Main: Examples and non-examples of the semicircle theorem, that could be used as questions for pupils to try. These include more interesting variations like using Pythagoras’ theorem or incorporating other angle rules. A set of questions with a progression in difficulty. These deliberately include a few questions that can’t be done, to focus pupils’ attention on the key features of diagrams. An extension task prompt for pupils to create their own questions using the two theorems already encountered. Plenary: Three discussion questions to promote deeper thinking, the first looking at alternative methods for one of the questions from the worksheet, the next considering whether a given line is a diameter, the third considering whether given diagrams show an acute, 90 degree or obtuse angle. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please do review if you buy as any feedback is greatly appreciated!
Circle theorems lesson 4
danwalker

Circle theorems lesson 4

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A complete lesson on the theorem that opposite angles in a cyclic quadrilateral sum to 180 degrees. Assumes that pupils have already met the theorems that the angle at the centre is twice the angle at the circumference, the angle in a semicircle is 90, and angles in the same segment are equal. See my other resources for lessons on these theorems. Activities included: Starter: Some basics recap questions on the theorems already covered. Main: An animation to define a cyclic quadrilateral, followed by a quick question for pupils, where they decide whether or not diagrams contain cyclic quadrilaterals. An example where the angle at the centre theorem is used to find an opposite angle in a cyclic quadrilateral, followed by a set of three similar questions for pupils to do. They are then guided to observe that the opposite angles sum to 180 degrees. A quick proof using a very similar method to the one pupils have just used. A set of 8 examples that could be used as questions for pupils to try and discuss. These have a progression in difficulty, with the later ones incorporating other angle rules. I’ve also thrown in a few non-examples. A worksheet of similar questions for pupils to consolidate, followed by a second worksheet with a slightly different style of question, where pupils work out if given quadrilaterals are cyclic. A related extension task, where pupils try to decide if certain shapes are always, sometimes or never cyclic. Plenary: A slide showing all four theorems so far, and a chance for pupils to reflect on these and see how the angle at the centre theorem can be used to prove all of the rest. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Vectors
danwalker

Vectors

(27)
A powerpoint with a series of lessons on GCSE vectors, with examples, activities and finally exam questions. Includes a few resources adapted from TES user payphone and another from jensilvermath.com.