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Dan Walker's Shop

Average Rating4.81
(based on 2798 reviews)

I'm a secondary school maths teacher with a passion for creating high quality resources. All of my complete lesson resources come as single powerpoint files, so everything you need is in one place. Slides have a clean, unfussy layout and I'm not big on plastering learning objectives or acronyms everywhere. My aim is to incorporate interesting, purposeful activities that really make pupils think. I have a website coming soon!

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I'm a secondary school maths teacher with a passion for creating high quality resources. All of my complete lesson resources come as single powerpoint files, so everything you need is in one place. Slides have a clean, unfussy layout and I'm not big on plastering learning objectives or acronyms everywhere. My aim is to incorporate interesting, purposeful activities that really make pupils think. I have a website coming soon!
Trigonometry - SOHCAHTOA finding sides
danwalkerdanwalker

Trigonometry - SOHCAHTOA finding sides

(0)
A complete lesson on using sin, cos and tan to find an unknown side of a right-angled triangle. Designed to come after pupils have been introduced to the trig ratios, and used them to find angles in right-angled triangles. Please see my other resources for complete lessons on these topics. Activities included: Starter: A quick reminder and some questions about using formulae triangles (e.g. the speed, distance, time triangle). This is to help pupils to transfer the same idea to the SOHCAHTOA formulae triangles. Main: A few examples and questions for pupils to try, on finding a side given one side and an angle. Initially, this is done without reference to SOHCAHTOA or formulae triangles, so that pupils need to think about whether to multiply or divide. More examples, but this time using formulae triangles. A worksheet with a progression in difficulty, building up to some challenging questions on finding perimeters of right-angled triangles, given one side and an angle. A tough extension, where pupils try to find lengths for the sides of a triangle with a given angle, so that it is has a perimeter of 20cm. Plenary: A prompt to get pupils thinking about how they are going to remember the rules and methods for this topic. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated! Error on previous version now fixed. If you have bought this already and want the amended version, please message me and I will email the file directly.
Sharing in a ratio
danwalkerdanwalker

Sharing in a ratio

(1)
A complete lesson on sharing an amount in a ratio. Assumes pupils have already learned how to use ratio notation and can interpret ratios as fractions - see my other resources for lessons on these topics. Activities included: Starter: A set of questions to recap ratio notation, equivalent ratios, simplifying ratios and interpreting ratios as fractions. Main: A quick activity where pupils shade grids in a given ratio( eg shading a 3 x 4 grid in the ratio shaded:unshaded of 1:2). The intention is that they are repeatedly shading the ratio at this stage, rather than directly dividing the 12 squares in the ratio 1:2. By the last question, with an intentionally large grid, hopefully pupils are thinking of a more efficient way to do this… Examples and quick questions using a bar modelling approach to sharing an amount in a a given ratio. A set of questions on sharing in a ratio, with a progression in difficulty. Includes the trickier variations of this topic that sometimes appear on exams (eg Jo and Bob share some money in the ratio 1:2, Jo gets £30 more than Bob, how much did they share?) A nice puzzle where pupils move matchsticks(well, paper images of them) to divide a grid in different ratios. Plenary: A final spot-the-mistake question, again on the theme of the trickier variations of this topic that pupils often fail to spot. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Averages - mean, median and mode
danwalkerdanwalker

Averages - mean, median and mode

(0)
A complete lesson for introducing mean, median and mode for a list of data. Activities included: Mini whiteboard questions to check pupil understanding of the basic methods. A worksheet of straight forward questions. Mini whiteboard questions with a progression in difficulty, to build up the skills required to do some problem solving... A worksheet of more challenging questions, where pupils are given some of the averages of a set of data, and they have to work out what the raw data is. Some final questions to stimulate discussion about the relative merits of each average. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review it if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Equations of perpendicular lines
danwalkerdanwalker

Equations of perpendicular lines

(0)
A complete lesson on using knowledge of gradient to find the equation of a line perpendicular to a given line. Nothing fancy, but provides clear examples, printable worksheets and answers for this tricky topic. Please review it if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Bearings
danwalkerdanwalker

Bearings

(3)
A complete lesson on introducing 3-figure bearings. Activities included: Starter: A quick set of questions to remind pupils of supplementary angles. Main: A quick puzzle to get pupils thinking about compass points. Slides to introduce compass points, the compass and 3-figure bearings. Examples and questions for pupils to try on finding bearings fro m diagrams. A set of worksheets with a progression in difficulty, from correctly measuring bearings and scale drawings to using angle rules to find bearings. Includes some challenging questions involving three points, that should promote discussion about different approaches to obtaining an answer. Plenary: A prompt to discuss how the bearings of A from B and B from A are connected. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Finding the nth term rule of a quadratic sequence
danwalkerdanwalker

Finding the nth term rule of a quadratic sequence

(1)
A complete lesson on finding the nth term rule of a quadratic sequence. This primarily focuses on one method (see cover slide), although I’ve thrown in a different method as an extension. I always cover linear sequences in a similar way and incorporate a recap on this within the lesson. Starter: To prepare for the main part of the lesson, pupils try to solve a system of three equations with three unknowns. Main: A recap on finding the nth term rule of a linear sequence, to prepare pupils for a similar method with quadratic sequences. Examples on the core method, followed by a worksheet with a progression in difficulty for pupils to practice. I’ve included two versions of the worksheet - a simple list of questions that could be projected, or a much more structured worksheet that could be printed. Worked solutions are included. A worked example of an alternative method, that could be given as a handout for pupils who finish early to try on the questions they’ve already done. Plenary: A proof of why the method works. I’d much rather show this at the start of the lesson, but in my experience this usually overloads students and puts them off if used too soon! Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Finding an nth term rule of a linear sequence
danwalkerdanwalker

Finding an nth term rule of a linear sequence

(0)
A complete lesson for first teaching pupils how to find the nth term rule of a linear sequence. Activities included: Starter: Questions on one-step linear equations (which pupils will need to solve later). Main: Examples and quick questions for pupils to try and receive feedback. A set of questions with a progression in difficulty, from increasing to decreasing sequences, for pupils to practice independently. Plenary: A proof of why the method for finding the nth term rule works. Answers provided throughout. Please review it if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Compound interest
danwalkerdanwalker

Compound interest

(1)
A complete lesson on compound interest calculations. Activities included: Starter: A set of questions to refresh pupils on making percentage increases. Main: Examples and quick questions on interest. Examples and a worksheet on compound interest by adding on the interest each year. Examples and a worksheet on compound interest using the direct multiplier method. A challenging set of extension questions. Plenary: A prompt for pupils to think about the graph of compounded savings with time. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Nets of 3D solids
danwalkerdanwalker

Nets of 3D solids

(0)
A complete lesson on drawing nets and visualising how they fold. The content has some overlap with a resource I have freely shared on the TES website for years, but has now been augmented and significantly upgraded,as well as being presented in a full, three-part lesson format. Activities included: Starter: A matching activity, where pupils match up names of solids, 3D sketches and nets. Main: A link to an online gogebra file (no software required) that allows you to fold and unfold various nets, to help pupils visualise. A question with an accurate, visual worked answer, where pupils make an accurate drawing of a cuboid’s net. Rather than answer lots of similar questions, pupils are then asked to compare answers with others and discuss whether their answers are different and/or correct. The same process with a triangular prism. A brief look at other prisms and a tetrahedron (the latter has the potential to be used to revise constructions if pupils have done them before, or could be briefly discussed as a future task, or left out) Then two activities with a different focus - the first looking at whether some given sketches are valid nets of cubes, the second about visualising which vertices of a net of a cube would meet when folded. Plenary: A brief look at some more elaborate nets, a link to a silly but fun net related video and a link to a second video, which describes a potential follow up or homework task. Printable worksheets and answers included where appropriate. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Reverse percentage
danwalkerdanwalker

Reverse percentage

(2)
A complete lesson (or maybe two) on finding an original amount, given a sale price or the value of something after it has been increased. Looks at both calculator and non-calculator methods. Activities included: Starter: A set of four puzzles where pupils work their way back to 100%, given another percentage. Main: Examples, quick questions for pupils to try and a worksheet on calculator methods for reversing a percentage problem. Examples, quick questions for pupils to try and a worksheet on non- calculator methods for reversing a percentage problem. Both worksheets have been scaffolded to help pupils with this tricky topic. A challenging extension task where pupils form and solve equations involving connected amounts. Plenary: A final question to address the classic misconception for this topic. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Fibonacci sequences
danwalkerdanwalker

Fibonacci sequences

(4)
A complete lesson with the 9-1 GCSE Maths specification in mind. Activities included: Starter: Some recap questions on solving two-step linear equations (needed later in the lesson). Main: An introduction to Fibonacci sequences, followed by a quick activity where pupils extend Fibonacci sequences. A challenging, rich task, inspired by one of TES user scottyknowles18’s excellent sequences rich tasks. Pupils try to come up with Fibonacci sequences that fit different criteria (eg that the 4th term is 10). Great for encouraging creativity and discussion. A related follow up activity where pupils try to find missing numbers in given Fibonacci sequences, initially by trial and error, but then following some explanation, by forming and solving linear equations. Extension - a slightly harder version of the follow up activity. Plenary: A look at an alternative algebraic method for finding missing numbers. Some slides could be printed as worksheets, although it’s not strictly necessary. Answers to most tasks included, but not the open-ended rich task. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Area of a trapezium
danwalkerdanwalker

Area of a trapezium

(0)
A complete lesson for introducing the trapezium area rule. Activities included: Starter: Non-calculator BIDMAS questions relating to the calculations needed to area of a trapezium. A good chance to discuss misconceptions about multiplying by a half. Main: Reminder of shape properties of a trapezium Example-question pairs, giving pupils a quick opportunity to try and receive feedback. A worksheet of straight forward questions with a progression in difficulty, although I have also built in a few things for more able students to think about. (eg what happens if all the measurement double?) A challenging extension task where pupils work in reverse, finding measurements given areas. Plenary: Nice visual proof of rule by relating to the rule for the area of a parallelogram. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review it if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Vectors
danwalkerdanwalker

Vectors

(71)
A powerpoint with a series of lessons on GCSE vectors, with examples, activities and finally exam questions. Includes a few resources adapted from TES user payphone and another from jensilvermath.com.
Square numbers
danwalkerdanwalker

Square numbers

(4)
A collection of 5 activities involving square numbers that I’ve accumulated over the years from various sources: a puzzle I saw on Twitter involving recognising square numbers. a harder puzzle using some larger square numbers and a bit of logic. a sequences problem that links to square numbers a mini investigation that could lead to some basic algebraic proof work a trick involving mentally calculating squares of large numbers, plus a proof of why it works Please review if you like it or even if you don’t!
Coordinates
danwalkerdanwalker

Coordinates

(117)
A powerpoint including examples, worksheets and solutions on plotting coordinates in all 4 quadrants and problem solving involving coordinates. Worksheets at bottom of presentation for printing.
Generating quadratic sequences
danwalkerdanwalker

Generating quadratic sequences

(1)
A complete lesson on using an nth term rule of a quadratic sequence. Starter: A quick quiz on linear sequences, to set the scene for doing similar techniques with quadratic sequences. Main: A recap on using an nth term rule to generate terms in a linear sequence, by substituting. An example of doing the same for a quadratic sequence, followed by a short worksheet for pupils to practice and an extension task for quick finishers. A slide showing how pupils can check their answers by looking at the differences between terms. A mini-competition to check understanding so far. A set of open questions for pupils to explore, where they try to find nth term rules that fit simple criteria. The intention is that this will develop their sense of how the coefficients of the rule affect the sequence. Plenary: A final question with a slightly different perspective on generating sequences - given an initial sequence and its rule, pupils state the sequences given by related rules. No printing needed, although I’ve included something that could be printed off as a worksheet. Please review if you buy, as any feedback is appreciated!
Angles in a triangle
danwalkerdanwalker

Angles in a triangle

(1)
A complete lesson on the interior angle sum of a triangle. Activities included: Starter: Some simple recap questions on angles on a line, as this rule will used to ‘show’ why the interior angle sum for a triangle is 180. Main: A nice animation showing a smiley moving around the perimeter of a triangle, turning through the interior angles until it gets back to where it started. It completes a half turn and so demonstrates the rule. This is followed up by instructions for the more common method of pupils drawing a triangle, marking the corners, cutting them out and arranging them to form a straight line. This is also animated nicely. A few basic questions for pupils to try, a quick reminder of the meaning of scalene, isosceles and equilateral (I would do a lesson on triangle types before doing interior angle sum), then pupils do more basic calculations (two angles are directly given), but also have to identify what type of triangles they get. An extended set of examples and non-examples with trickier isosceles triangle questions, followed by two sets of questions. The first are standard questions with one angle and side facts given, the second where pupils discuss whether triangles are possible, based on the information given. A possible extension task is also described, that has a lot of scope for further exploration. Plenary A link to an online geogebra file (no software needed, just click on the hyperlink). This shows a triangle whose points can be moved dynamically, whilst showing the exact size of each angle and a nice graphic of the angles forming a straight line. I’ve listed some probing questions that could be used at this point, depending on the class. I’ve included key questions and ideas in the notes box. Optional, printable worksheets and answers included. Please do review if you buy as any feedback is helpful and appreciated!
Equivalent and simplified ratios
danwalkerdanwalker

Equivalent and simplified ratios

(0)
A complete lesson on generating equivalent ratios and simplifying a ratio. Activities included: Starter: A set of questions to remind pupils how to find equivalent fractions and simplify fractions. I always use fraction equivalence to introduce ratio, so reminding pupils of these methods now helps them see the connections between the two topics. Main: A matching activity where pupils pair up diagrams showing objects in the same ratio. Examples and quick questions on finding equivalent ratios (eg 2:5 = 8:?) A matching activity on the same theme. Examples and a set of questions on simplifying ratios. A challenging extension task, using equivalent fractions in a problem-solving scenario. Plenary: A final odd-one-out question to reinforce the key ideas of the lesson. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Trigonometry - SOHCAHTOA finding angles
danwalkerdanwalker

Trigonometry - SOHCAHTOA finding angles

(0)
A complete lesson on finding an angle in a right-angled triangle using trig ratios. Designed to come after pupils have been introduced to the ratios sin, cos and tan, and have investigated how the ratios vary. Please see my other resources for complete lessons on these topics. Activities included: Starter: Provided with the graph of y=sinx, pupils estimate sinx for different values of x and vice-versa. Main: Slides to introduce use of scientific calculators to find accurate values for angles or ratios. Examples of the basic method of finding an angle given two sides. Includes graphs to reinforce what is happening. Quick questions for pupils to try and provided feedback. A worksheet of questions with a progression in difficulty. Starts with standard questions, then moves on to more challenging ones (eg finding the smallest angle in a non-right-angled, isosceles triangle). Plenary: A final question to check pupils’ understanding, but also with a combinations/logic element. Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!
Pythagoras' theorem
danwalkerdanwalker

Pythagoras' theorem

(1)
A complete lesson for first introducing Pythagoras’ theorem. Activities included: Starter: A set of equations to solve, similar to what pupils will need to solve when doing Pythagoras questions. Includes a few sneaky ones that should cause some discussion. Main: Examples and quick question to make sure pupils can identify the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle. Optional ‘discovery’ activity of pupils measuring sides of triangles and making calculations to demonstrate Pythagoras’ theorem. Questions to get pupils thinking about when Pythagoras’ theorem applies and when it doesn’t. Examples and quick questions for pupils to try on the standard, basic questions of finding either the hypotenuse or a shorter side. A worksheet with a mild progression in difficulty, from integer sides and answers to decimals. An extension task of a ‘pile up’ activity (based on an idea by William Emeny, but I did make this one myself). Plenary: Some multiple choice questions to consolidate the basic method, but also give a taster of other geometry problems Pythagoras’ theorem can be used for (e.g. finding the length of the diagonal of a rectangle). Printable worksheets and answers included. Please review if you buy as any feedback is appreciated!