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Progression in Music Books: Signs and Symbols
dwheway1955dwheway1955

Progression in Music Books: Signs and Symbols

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One of a series of 5 books for progression work across the primary age-range and written primarily with the ‘generalist’ music teacher in mind. However, specialists/coordinators may appreciate ideas they can add to their music-teaching repertoire. The materials also work well in a Professional Development context. ‘Signs and Symbols’ Focuses on developing simple ways of representing sound, from pictorial, through signs then simple invented symbolic representation, leading to children’s own graphic compositions. The terms ‘signs’ and ‘symbol’ are used to differentiate the children’s invented representations from ‘staff’ notation (e.g. crotchets, quavers, etc.), but are a useful precursor to stave notation. There are five books in the series, building to a very comprehensive scheme for the primary age range. In addition to Signs and Symbols’, these include: ‘It’s OK’ Focuses on developing active listening to music, identifying aspects such as musical elements, purpose and response. Children develop a technical language including ways to respond emotionally, including through language ‘Safari Park’ Focuses on exploring sound, (vocal and instrumental); working with others to refine and select sounds for compositions. Activities are intentionally brief, encouraging exploration and development of ideas. ‘Bubbles’: Focuses on developing awareness of, and ability to maintain a steady beat and rhythm, whilst supporting children in reading simple notation and composition. The activities are revisited, each time progressing children onto the next level. There are suggestions for teachers on what to observe, how to encourage children to reflect on their work, and producing compositions to perform to others. Throughout, there are activities/games for the primary classroom. ‘Listen Carefully’ Focuses on developing awareness of pitch, the ability to develop pitch awareness and composition on tuned percussion and vocally. The materials support children in reading simple pitch notations with ideas which relate to and lead into staff notation.
Progression in Music Books: Bubbles
dwheway1955dwheway1955

Progression in Music Books: Bubbles

(0)
One of a series of 5 books for progression work across the primary age-range and written primarily with the ‘generalist’ music teacher in mind. However, specialists/coordinators may appreciate ideas they can add to their music-teaching repertoire. The materials also work well in a Professional Development context. Bubbles: Focuses on developing awareness of, and ability to maintain a steady beat and rhythm, whilst supporting children in reading simple notation and composition. The activities are revisited, each time progressing children onto the next level. There are suggestions for teachers on what to observe, how to encourage children to reflect on their work, and producing compositions to perform to others. Throughout, there are activities/games for the primary classroom. There are five books in the series, building to a very comprehensive scheme for the primary age range. In addition to Bubbles, these include: ‘Safari Park’ Focuses on exploring sound, (vocal and instrumental); working with others to refine and select sounds for compositions. Activities are intentionally brief, encouraging exploration and development of ideas. ‘Listen Carefully’ Focuses on developing awareness of pitch, the ability to develop pitch awareness and composition on tuned percussion and vocally. The materials support children in reading simple pitch notations with ideas which relate to and lead into staff notation. ‘It’s OK’ Focuses on developing active listening and identifying aspects and terminology of music including response and genre. ‘Signs and Symbols’ Focuses on developing simple ways of representing sound, from pictorial, through signs then simple invented symbolic representation, leading to children’s own graphic compositions. The terms ‘signs’ and ‘symbol’ are used to differentiate the children’s invented representations from ‘staff’ notation (e.g. crotchets, quavers, etc.), but are a useful precursor to stave notation.
Progression in Music Books: Listen Carefully
dwheway1955dwheway1955

Progression in Music Books: Listen Carefully

(0)
One of a series of 5 books for progression work across the primary age-range and written primarily with the ‘generalist’ music teacher in mind. However, specialists/coordinators may appreciate ideas they can add to their music-teaching repertoire. The materials also work well in a Professional Development context. ‘Listen Carefully’ Focuses on developing awareness of pitch, the ability to develop pitch awareness and composition on tuned percussion and vocally. The materials support children in reading simple pitch notations with ideas which relate to and lead into staff notation. There are five books in the series, building to a very comprehensive scheme for the primary age range. In addition to ‘Listen Carefully’, these include: It’s OK’ Focuses on developing active listening to music, identifying aspects such as musical elements, purpose and response. Children develop a technical language including ways to respond emotionally, including through language ‘Safari Park’ Focuses on exploring sound, (vocal and instrumental); working with others to refine and select sounds for compositions. Activities are intentionally brief, encouraging exploration and development of ideas. ‘Bubbles’: Focuses on developing awareness of, and ability to maintain a steady beat and rhythm, whilst supporting children in reading simple notation and composition. The activities are revisited, each time progressing children onto the next level. There are suggestions for teachers on what to observe, how to encourage children to reflect on their work, and producing compositions to perform to others. Throughout, there are activities/games for the primary classroom. ‘Signs and Symbols’ Focuses on developing simple ways of representing sound, from pictorial, through signs then simple invented symbolic representation, leading to children’s own graphic compositions. The terms ‘signs’ and ‘symbol’ are used to differentiate the children’s invented representations from ‘staff’ notation (e.g. crotchets, quavers, etc.), but are a useful precursor to stave notation.
Progression in Music Books: It's OK
dwheway1955dwheway1955

Progression in Music Books: It's OK

(0)
One of a series of 5 books for progression work across the primary age-range and written primarily with the ‘generalist’ music teacher in mind. However, specialists/coordinators may appreciate ideas they can add to their music-teaching repertoire. The materials also work well in a Professional Development context. ‘It’s OK’ Focuses on developing active listening to music, identifying aspects such as musical elements, purpose and response. Children develop a technical language including ways to respond emotionally, including through language There are five books in the series, building to a very comprehensive scheme for the primary age range. In addition to It’s OK’, these include: ‘Safari Park’ Focuses on exploring sound, (vocal and instrumental); working with others to refine and select sounds for compositions. Activities are intentionally brief, encouraging exploration and development of ideas. ‘Bubbles’: Focuses on developing awareness of, and ability to maintain a steady beat and rhythm, whilst supporting children in reading simple notation and composition. The activities are revisited, each time progressing children onto the next level. There are suggestions for teachers on what to observe, how to encourage children to reflect on their work, and producing compositions to perform to others. Throughout, there are activities/games for the primary classroom. ‘Listen Carefully’ Focuses on developing awareness of pitch, the ability to develop pitch awareness and composition on tuned percussion and vocally. The materials support children in reading simple pitch notations with ideas which relate to and lead into staff notation. ‘Signs and Symbols’ Focuses on developing simple ways of representing sound, from pictorial, through signs then simple invented symbolic representation, leading to children’s own graphic compositions. The terms ‘signs’ and ‘symbol’ are used to differentiate the children’s invented representations from ‘staff’ notation (e.g. crotchets, quavers, etc.), but are a useful precursor to stave notation.
Progression in Music  Books
dwheway1955dwheway1955

Progression in Music Books

(0)
There are [5 books in the Progression in Music series] https://www.primary-music.org/publications-1), each written primarily with the generalist music teacher in mind, but with ideas for collaboration between visiting musicians and the generalist class teacher in developing curriculum classroom. They can be purchased from the Lulu books website (by searching the bookstore), or through websites such as Amazon searching by authors name: David Wheway. ‘Safari Park’: Focuses on exploring sound, (vocal and instrumental); working with others to refine and select sounds for compositions. Composition work is developed progressively across the primary age-range. Activities are intentionally brief, encouraging exploration and development of ideas. There are suggestions for assessing the children’s progress, and for children to reflect on their work. ‘Bubbles’: Focuses on developing awareness of, and ability to maintain a steady beat and rhythm, whilst supporting children in reading simple notation and composition. Throughout are activities/games for the primary classroom ‘Listen Carefully’: Focuses on developing awareness of pitch, the ability to develop pitch awareness and composition on tuned percussion and vocally. The materials support children in reading simple pitch notations with ideas which relate to and ‘It’s OK’: Focuses on developing active listening and identifying aspects and terminology of music including response and genre. ‘Signs and Symbols’ Focuses on developing simple ways of representing sound, from pictorial, through signs then simple invented symbolic representation, leading to children’s own graphic compositions. The terms ‘signs’ and ‘symbol’ are used to differentiate the children’s invented representations from ‘staff’ notation (e.g. crotchets, quavers, etc.), but are a useful precursor to stave notation.