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I am an experienced teacher based in the South East who has taught English and Media Studies.

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I am an experienced teacher based in the South East who has taught English and Media Studies.
Act 3, sc 2: The Macbeths swap roles

Act 3, sc 2: The Macbeths swap roles

In this lesson students are asked to explain how Macbeth and Lady Macbeth’s roles have reversed in the story judging by their language. The lesson starts by asking students to identify the differences between them as people, referring to what they have previously learned. Students are then asked to read the scene where Macbeth admits to his torturous guilt (a link is provided to Ian McKellan and Judi Dench's performance). They are then to colour code where they find particular patterns in the imagery Macbeth uses and then invited to compare his use of language to his wife's previous use within her soliloquy near the start of the play. The lesson ends with an opportunity to respond independently by writing an essay paragraph. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'notes' under the powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
Persuasive Lady Macbeth, Act 1, scene 7

Persuasive Lady Macbeth, Act 1, scene 7

In this lesson students are asked to peer assess an extract from an essay and set themselves their own target based on their scrutiny of success criteria provided. After this, they are asked to identify and explain how Lady Macbeth uses language to persuade Macbeth to kill Duncan. Attached is a printable grid listing persuasive devices where students can annotate suitable quotes from the text. On these slides are essay prompts where students can then write up their findings, aiming to act on the target they set at the start of the lesson. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'Notes' under Powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
Revising Macbeth as a Tragic Hero

Revising Macbeth as a Tragic Hero

This lesson asks students to explore the character of Macbeth across the play by commenting on the significance of quotes (A01,2, 3). It refers to the success criteria of the AQA English Literature GCSE but can be adapted for your course. The lesson starts by asking students to summarize him as a character using adjectives and then to narrow down his appearances into 5 'top' moments in order to remind them of the wider picture. Slides reminding them of these follow as well as a list of links to online videos of some of these key scenes. Since there's not always time in lessons, perhaps they can be given to students to watch as homework. Attached is a 'quote explosion' sheet of quotes that he says or that others say about him. Students can stick these across a page in their exercise book and annotate what they show about him as a character and pick out any imagery (symbolism, metaphor, antithesis, apostrophe etc). It could also be blown up to A3 size (great for displays!) A copy of this is on a slide in the Powerpoint for the teacher / students to also annotate on the board when the class gathers their ideas together. Next there is a list of 'challenge/extension' tasks which explore Macbeth as a tragic hero. A list of qualities expected in tragic protagonists is listed and students can discuss how Shakespeare used this formula to enrich the plot. The lesson ends with a chance for students to write independent essay paragraphs with AQA's exam success criteria but this can be adapted for your course. There are 3 options on how to approach essay writing: 'layers of meaning', PEA, or the 'reading ladder' which follow the same idea. There is then an opportunity to self or peer assess according to the key skills. As with all my lessons, there are 'Talk for Writing' activities and Challenge tasks for more able students. Please see my other lessons on Macbeth which explain his state of mind in more detail.
flabs84
Macbeth, Act 3, sc 4: Banquo’s ghost at the feast

Macbeth, Act 3, sc 4: Banquo’s ghost at the feast

In this lesson students are asked to consider how Shakespeare exposes Macbeth’s loss of control. The lesson starts by asking students to identify where in the play so far the theme of the supernatural has been explored. Students are then asked to read the scene where Macbeth alone sees Banquo's ghost and reacts wildly in front of his guests (a link is provided to Patrick Stewart's performance). In groups they are then asked to consider key questions about how his behaviour builds tension and how it reflects his loss of control. The lesson ends with an opportunity to respond independently by writing an essay paragraph. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'notes' under powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
Lady Macbeth as the Perfect Hostess, Act 1, scene 6

Lady Macbeth as the Perfect Hostess, Act 1, scene 6

In this lesson students are asked to comment on what Lady Macbeth's use of language shows about her intentions within the story. As with the last lesson, there is emphasis on how dramatic irony works within scene. Students are asked to identify where she is deliberately being polite in order to hide her murderous intentions towards Duncan who has arrived at her castle. After this stage, students are then asked to find imagery within her dialogue which is a key skill that these lessons encourage throughout the project. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'Notes' under Powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
Revising Macbeth as a Tragic Hero

Revising Macbeth as a Tragic Hero

This lesson asks students to explore the character of Macbeth across the play by commenting on the significance of quotes (A01,2, 3). It refers to the success criteria of the AQA English Literature GCSE but can be adapted for your course. The lesson starts by asking students to summarize him as a character using adjectives and then to narrow down his appearances into 5 'top' moments in order to remind them of the wider picture. Slides reminding them of these follow as well as a list of links to online videos of some of these key scenes. Since there's not always time in lessons, perhaps they can be given to students to watch as homework. Attached is a 'quote explosion' sheet of quotes that he says or that others say about him. Students can stick these across a page in their exercise book and annotate what they show about him as a character and pick out any imagery (symbolism, metaphor, antithesis, apostrophe etc). It could also be blown up to A3 size (great for displays!) A copy of this is on a slide in the Powerpoint for the teacher / students to also annotate on the board when the class gathers their ideas together. Next there is a list of 'challenge/extension' tasks which explore Macbeth as a tragic hero. A list of qualities expected in tragic protagonists is listed and students can discuss how Shakespeare used this formula to enrich the plot. The lesson ends with a chance for students to write independent essay paragraphs with AQA's exam success criteria but this can be adapted for your course. There are 3 options on how to approach essay writing: 'layers of meaning', PEA, or the 'reading ladder' which follow the same idea. There is then an opportunity to self or peer assess according to the key skills. As with all my lessons, there are 'Talk for Writing' activities and Challenge tasks for more able students. Please see my other lessons on Macbeth which explain his state of mind in more detail.
flabs84
Macbeth Wants More, Act 1, scene 4

Macbeth Wants More, Act 1, scene 4

This lesson asks students to identify how Shakespeare establishes Macbeth as a cunning character and builds tension within a scene. This powerpoint offers pertinent questions for students to consider about the dramatic irony which underlies the scene where Macbeth plays host to King Duncan. There is a tick sheet where students are to identify how key quotes refer to key themes and a chance to 'explode' a key quote as part of the plenary. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'Notes' under Powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
Lord of the Flies, Character Quote Banks

Lord of the Flies, Character Quote Banks

Attached are quote banks from across the novel on the following characters: - Ralph - Jack - Piggy - Roger The quotes listed are either taken from the narration or from dialogue and the page each comes from is referred to so that they're easy to find (based on the Faber and Faber edition with the red cover: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lord-Flies-William-Golding/dp/B00IIAU0EK). At the top of each page is an easy to read bullet point list which summarises the main ideas about that character. These sheets are useful for revision for the English Literature GCSE. Students could add the quotes to revision cards or stick these across a double page in their exercise book and annotate them as a class exercise.
flabs84
Nothing's Changed by Tatamkhulu Afrika

Nothing's Changed by Tatamkhulu Afrika

An oldie but a goodie! This is still an interesting poem to explore with classes who you feel would benefit from studying the themes of conflict, prejudice and racism. This could be a lesson within a unit on conflict poetry in year 9 or may be used as a chance to explore an 'unseen' poetry which is not in your GCSE class's anthology of Literature exam poems. The poem, if you don't know it, describes a South African's feelings whilst walking through a familiar community that was devastated by the effects of the Apartheid in South Africa. The lesson begins by asking students to define the concept of segregation and then teases out any facts they may already know about the Apartheid regime. There are images and some facts for them to consider. They are then introduced to the 'WPSLOMP' method of analysing poetry as well as being asked to colour code devices the poet uses for effect (metaphor, simile, peaceful and violent imagery). The lesson ends with a chance for students to write independent essay paragraphs with a generic success criteria which can be adapted for your course. There are 3 options on how to approach essay writing: 'layers of meaning', PEA, or the 'reading ladder' which follow the same idea. Attached is; - A blank copy of the poem with a word box for tricky words - A handout of Apartheid images - Essay PEA styles sentence starters writing frames for weaker students - A worksheet with a range of tasks on it along with the poem (good cover work?) - A storyboard template - A powerpoint with the lesson clearly outlined
flabs84
Mrs Sybil Birling in 'An Inspector Calls'

Mrs Sybil Birling in 'An Inspector Calls'

This lesson asks students to analyse what Mrs Birling’s dialogue shows about her as a character and consider how the audience is meant to react. The lesson starts by asking students to consider what what role she plays and how she develops as a character. There is a 'challenge task' also provided which asks them to think about how a modern audience responds to her. There is a list of quotes from across the play attached as a handout which students can think about in pairs and they can then be annotated on the board by students/the teacher. Students are then asked to list the positive and negative aspects of her character and what she does across the play. There are some suggestions which follow this. The lesson ends with a chance for students to write independent essay paragraphs with the AQA English Literature GCSE success criteria which can be adapted for your course. There are 3 options on how to approach essay writing: 'layers of meaning', PEA, or the 'reading ladder' which follow the same idea. There is then an opportunity to self or peer assess according to the key skills.
flabs84
Persuasive Lady Macbeth, Act 1, scene 7

Persuasive Lady Macbeth, Act 1, scene 7

In this lesson students are asked to peer assess an extract from an essay and set themselves their own target based on their scrutiny of success criteria provided. After this, they are asked to identify and explain how Lady Macbeth uses language to persuade Macbeth to kill Duncan. Attached is a printable grid listing persuasive devices where students can annotate suitable quotes from the text. On these slides are essay prompts where students can then write up their findings, aiming to act on the target they set at the start of the lesson. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'Notes' under Powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
Introduction to the context of Macbeth

Introduction to the context of Macbeth

This is a bundle compiling of a powerpoint which introduces students to basic facts about Shakespeare, a sheet which lists facts about King James I, witchcraft and religious conflict in the 1600s that link to the play. Also there is a copy of act 1, scene 1 and an exit slip which can be used at the end of the lesson to assess students' understanding. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'notes' under powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
KS3 English/Media Project: Magazines

KS3 English/Media Project: Magazines

Attached are some resources for students to use in groups in order to make a magazine. This would be perfect for year 7 and 8 since from this age students need to be encouraged to read a wide range of non fiction texts in preparation for GCSE and magazines are a good place to start. I would suggest that you provide piles of different types of magazines for them inspect and scrutinize such as ones based on music, fashion, teen girl, cars, football/sport and gaming. Within their groups, students can assign roles and each student can plan and design their own page. Since I can't share images of front covers or pages from real magazines, I have left boxes on some of these planning sheets blank so that students can stick their own in to demonstrate their decision making. I have made these resources into PDFs so that the text boxes don't shift. The resources attached include: - Magazine Planning Sheet (a sheet to record their group's initial decisions) - Front Cover Analysis Sheets (provides space to stick examples and thinking prompts) - A suggested questionnaire for students to distribute or an exemplar which students can build on - Design a Contents Page - a planning resource - Design a Front Cover - a planning resource - Design a Letters or Problem Page - a planning resource - Design a Product Review - a planning resource - Page Templates - boxed sections to place text and images - Planning an Advert - a planning resource - Spellings - suggested spelling lists which can be adapted - Write a Feature Article - a planning resource.
flabs84
Run a 'Poetry Shorts' Film Competition at your school

Run a 'Poetry Shorts' Film Competition at your school

Ever run an English based film making competition at your school? This one asks students to plan and record a short film exploring a poem about the theme of remembrance. Students could use imovie on their iphones or by using the computers at your school. Attached is a handout which lists youtube videos which act as inspiration for keen film makers and and a list of poems which touch on the set theme. These poems include 'Ozymandias' by Shelley and 'Funeral Blues' by W.H Auden. There is also a poster which advertises the competition across the school - both of which can be uploaded to Homework websites. Perhaps a scheme of work can be build around this?
flabs84
Act 4, sc 3: Macduff wants revenge

Act 4, sc 3: Macduff wants revenge

In this lesson students are asked to explore how Macbeth is portrayed as a tyrant by his enemies. The lesson starts by presenting students with a list of traditional kingly qualities and asking them to rank how Macbeth has met these so far in the play. Students are then asked to read the scene where Malcolm tests Macduff so that he may have confidence in him as an ally against Macbeth. In groups they are to then consider key questions about the effect of Macduff learning of his family's assassination on stage and how this will then effect the plot moving forward. The lesson ends with an opportunity to respond independently by writing an essay paragraph. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'notes' under Powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
Quote banks on key characters in 'The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'

Quote banks on key characters in 'The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'

Attached are 3 quote banks that are either 1 side of A4 or 2. All quotes are from across the novel. As a form of revision of the novel you could ask students to stick them across a double page in their exercise book and ask them to annotate them explaining what they show about those characters. They focus on Dr Jekyll, Mr Utterson and Mr Hyde only. They also contain word boxes which define any archaic language that would be useful for EAL students particularly. On some of these there are challenging questions which students can consider in groups or pairs.
flabs84
Act 4, sc 1: Macbeth revisits the Witches

Act 4, sc 1: Macbeth revisits the Witches

In this lesson students are asked to explain how events up to the start of Act 4 fit into the structure of the play and create more tension. The lesson starts by showing students Gustav Freytag's structure for a 5 act play and asks them to plot what would go where in the play so far by drawing a diagram in their book. Students are then asked to read the scene where Macbeth revisits the witches to retrieve more information about his position as King and consider how the story could now unfold. There are 2 links to both the McKellen and Fassbender film for this scene. There is an activity designed to help student unpick their fresh predictions and consider the concept of 'equivocation'. The lesson ends with an opportunity for students to explore how dangerous or useful the witches are to Macbeth using a continuum. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'notes' under powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84
Arthur Birling in 'An Inspector Calls'

Arthur Birling in 'An Inspector Calls'

This lesson asks students to analyse what Mr Birling’s dialogue shows about him as a character and consider how the audience is meant to react. The lesson starts by asking students to consider what his attitudes expose about attitudes in 1912 and what he symbolizes as a 'challenge' task. 2 extracts from the play follow this which students can think about in pairs and they can then be annotated on the board by students/the teacher. There is a handout to use with this task attached which has a word box to explain some of his political comments. Also attached is a list of quotes from across the whole play which illustrate a range of ideas about Arthur (either what he says or what others say about him). Students can annotate these in their books or they can be blown up to A3 size to write on. The lesson ends with a chance for students to write independent essay paragraphs with the AQA English Literature GCSE success criteria which can be adapted for your course. There are 3 options on how to approach essay writing: 'layers of meaning', PEA, or the 'reading ladder' which follow the same idea. There is then an opportunity to self or peer assess according to the key skills.
flabs84
Analyzing Structure in 'Spies' by Michael Frayn

Analyzing Structure in 'Spies' by Michael Frayn

Attached is a lesson where students are asked to identify how a writer has structured a text and comment on how that interests a reader (AO2, 3, 4). It uses an extract from 'Spies' by Michael Frayn. To start, students are asked to define the word 'structure' when we apply it to texts and as a 'challenge task' to list all the forms of structural devices that they are aware of. Slides follow with suggestions and a brief explanation of the AOs that they are assessed on by AQA in the English Language Paper 1. Students are then presented with the exam style question which in pairs they can identify the key words and suggest what the examiner is really looking for. The extract is attached with a word box and planning tasks which, after reading, students can tackle alone or with others. Other useful planning tasks follow such as colour coding structural devices and breaking down the story down into 4 stages. The lesson ends with a chance for students to write structured paragraphs in response to the question and there are sentence starters in the form of PEA attached to help. The lesson ends with a chance to self assess, referring to the success criteria for a grade 5. There is also a suggested homework task asking for student to research spies during the war and an accompanying video. This lesson, as my others, includes 'Talk for Writing' activities, pair and group tasks and differentiated tasks.
flabs84
'What Were They Like?' by Denise Levertov

'What Were They Like?' by Denise Levertov

This is a lesson on a poem which explores the consequences of the American attacks on Vietnam during the war. It features in the Edexcel anthology of Literature exam poems. It's particularly useful to compare to 'Kamikaze' by Beatrice Garland (AQA) or 'War Photographer by Carole Satyamurti (see my lesson on this in my shop). The lesson begins by asking students to comment on Vietnamese cultures based on images presented on the slide. There is then a slide which introduces them to the Vietnam war and then Denise Levertov as a poet. Students are then introduced to the 'WPSLOMP' method of analysing poetry which they can then apply in pairs before colour coding quotes which are examples of peaceful and violent imagery, as well as some more challenging devices. The ideas they pull together for this can then be explored as a class and the slides can be annotated by the teacher on the board and there are also some quotes colour coded as the answers. Students are then asked to think about structure and there is a slide which refers to the use of anaphora, alliteration and the overall effect of the poem's layout. The lesson ends with a chance for students to write independent essay paragraphs with Edexcel's exam success criteria but this can be adapted for your course. There are 3 options on how to approach essay writing: 'layers of meaning', PEA, or the 'reading ladder' which follow the same idea. There is then an opportunity to self or peer assess according to the key skills. As with all my lessons, there are 'Talk for Writing' activities and Challenge tasks for more able students. Attached is; - A powerpoint with the lesson clearly outlined - A copy of the poem with a word bank - A handout of glossary style word banks which students can stick into their anthologies - PEA style writing frames which can be cut out to support weaker students in their essay writing - Links to online videos/readings (see 'Notes' under slides). - A separate powerpoint with 2 suggested homework activities linked to this poem. If you like this resource, please review it!
flabs84
A bumper 'An Inspector Calls' Quiz

A bumper 'An Inspector Calls' Quiz

This is perfect as an end of term treat! This is a powerpoint containing 42 challenging questions about the play as a whole as well as the answers to them which are to be found at the end of the presentation. I have asked the class to get into groups/houses and then asked them to write their answers on a piece of paper. They can swap their answers with another group and at the end, the answers are revealed question by question so you can see which areas they struggled with. This is ideal for a higher set because there are some sneakier questions but this can easily be adapted. It should take up the best part of an hour's lesson.
flabs84
Act 3, sc 2: The Macbeths swap roles

Act 3, sc 2: The Macbeths swap roles

In this lesson students are asked to explain how Macbeth and Lady Macbeth’s roles have reversed in the story judging by their language. The lesson starts by asking students to identify the differences between them as people, referring to what they have previously learned. Students are then asked to read the scene where Macbeth admits to his torturous guilt (a link is provided to Ian McKellan and Judi Dench's performance). They are then to colour code where they find particular patterns in the imagery Macbeth uses and then invited to compare his use of language to his wife's previous use within her soliloquy near the start of the play. The lesson ends with an opportunity to respond independently by writing an essay paragraph. All lessons in this series include: - Links to online videos (see 'notes' under the powerpoint slides) - Starter tasks which introduce the main idea of the lesson - Differentiated tasks - Opportunities for pair and group talk within activities ('Talk for Writing') - Handouts of scenes or a selection of quotes from scenes studied - Alternating opportunities for self and peer assessment - Essay writing prompts to allow students to write about the scene - References to the AQA English Literature mark scheme for Paper 1, particularly to the demands for attaining a grade 5 - what is considered a 'good pass' for the qualification. It's suggested that you download the whole series to appreciate the full learning journey.
flabs84