The Geography of Summer Sports

The Geography of Summer Sports

This bundle should see you to the end of the summer term. Eight lessons altogether: four about the World Cup in Russia and then four about Wimbledon, which happens straight after we get knocked out of the football. Lots of concepts covered including waste management, sustainability, weather forecasting, economic geography, classification of industry, hooliganism and an interesting correlation exercise for those who like their statistics. Buy your department an end of year gift - all their remaning KS3 lessons planned and ready to roll for £10.00 or less.
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The Geography of Wimbledon

The Geography of Wimbledon

Here are four complete lessons about The Championships at Wimbledon - as seen by a geographer. Issues discussed include waste management, sustainability, economic geography, explaining the rain and weather forecasting. You can have these four lessons for £6.00 or buy them with The Geography of the World Cup, in which case you would get 8 lessons for £10.00.
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Geography of the World Cup (Russia 2018)

Geography of the World Cup (Russia 2018)

This little bundle of four lessons will enable you to keep your students focused during the tournament. It will last as long as the England team do, anyway; about a fortnight, although you could extend some of the activities if we get past the group stages. There’s one lesson that focuses on location, a second on the benefits and problems of running a global sporting event, another on building big stadiums and a fourth on examining hypotheses using correlation.
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Wimbledon Geography : Game, Set and Trash

Wimbledon Geography : Game, Set and Trash

This resource looks at how the many tonnes of waste that The Championships generates is handled. Students get to think about the types of waste that are created from smoked salmon that has gone off to empty champagne bottles. They get to learn about organic and inorganic waste, what can be recycled and what can’t, what gets incinerated and what ends up in landfill. They create a flow chart for handling waste and design a poster to raise awareness of waste at Wimbledon.
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Wimbledon Geography: We're in the money

Wimbledon Geography: We're in the money

This lesson is an introduction to economic geography that uses the Wimbledon Championships as a case study. Students get to consider the costs and benefits of running the tournament and draw up a simple balance sheet. The lesson covers different types of work (seasonal, temporary, paid, voluntary etc.) and gets students thinking about who the producers and consumers of the services are at the tournament. There is a role play exercise in which two people argue about the cost of going to the tournament and some longer essay questions to extend more able learners and provide homework opportunties.
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The Geography of Wimbledon

The Geography of Wimbledon

Here are four complete lessons about The Championships at Wimbledon - as seen by a geographer. Issues discussed include waste management, sustainability, economic geography, explaining the rain and weather forecasting. You can have these four lessons for £6.00 or buy them with The Geography of the World Cup, in which case you would get 8 lessons for £10.00.
gesbcs
The Geography of Summer Sports

The Geography of Summer Sports

This bundle should see you to the end of the summer term. Eight lessons altogether: four about the World Cup in Russia and then four about Wimbledon, which happens straight after we get knocked out of the football. Lots of concepts covered including waste management, sustainability, weather forecasting, economic geography, classification of industry, hooliganism and an interesting correlation exercise for those who like their statistics. Buy your department an end of year gift - all their remaning KS3 lessons planned and ready to roll for £10.00 or less.
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Wimbledon Geography: Balls and Sustainability

Wimbledon Geography: Balls and Sustainability

This lesson takes a look at issues of globalisation and sustainability by considering the 50,000 mile supply chain of the Slazenger tennis balls used for The Championships in Wimbledon. Students have to , first, identify the raw materials (rubber, glue, felt etc.) before going on to look at where they are found and why Slazenger makes balls for a tournament in London 10,000km in Bataan in the Phillippines. The lesson concludes with a variety of differentiated written tasks.
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Wimbledon Geography: Rain Stops Play

Wimbledon Geography: Rain Stops Play

This resource looks at the harm done by a rainy day at Wimbledon. It explores the impact of bad weather at The Championships, invites students to examine a complex climate graph, explains orographic (relief), frontal and convectional rainfall. There are also rainfall radar images to interpret and a microforecast specifically for Wimbledon. Students are challenged to consider the question "No one should have to pay for a weather forecast. DIscuss.’ in an extension task.
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PSHCE and Financial Literacy: Living with Poverty

PSHCE and Financial Literacy: Living with Poverty

This resource challenges students to think about what it is like to live below the poverty line. It gets students thinking about the numbers of people who go without essentials. There is an exercise which involves feeding a family of 4 with £32.00, being roughly what a person on benefits has left when all the bills are paid. The prices were correct in 2006 and will need adjusting for inflation.
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Conflict: A geographical perspective (Unit of Work)

Conflict: A geographical perspective (Unit of Work)

This resource is a collection of 15 PowerPoint presentations that were used to deliver a bridging unit between Key Stage 3 and GCSE Geography but which could also be used for PSHCE lessons. It is ideal for using with Year 8/9 classes who have made their option choices as it engages those who have not opted for Geography but teaches vital skills to those who are going on to GCSE. There are some purely skills-based lessons such as ‘Describing Landscapes: Photo Sketches’ and ‘Contrasting Landscapes of the Middle East’ but other lessons are specfic to certain conflicts and events in history such as 9/11, the Syrian Civil War and the Middle East conflict.
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Introducing India: Travel Magazine Task

Introducing India: Travel Magazine Task

This is a complete lesson for introducing India to classes in KS2 and KS3. It includes a link to a video, from which students take notes about human and physical features of the country and asks students to imagine that they are a travel writer, working for an imaginary company called ‘Indian Inspirations’, A prompt slide gives examples of the place names, features and describing words they could use. The template is included for their submission to the editor, which is 200 words of copy for an introductory page in a travel brochure.
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Plate Tectonics for A Level

Plate Tectonics for A Level

This is a small collection of presentations that was originally designed to support the teaching of the A2 Plate Tectonics unit for the AQA course. It covers revising the structure of the earth from a GCSE-level understanding, detailed notes about different types of plate boundaries and types of volcanic activity. It includes work on Hawaii as an example of a hot spot and introduces some minor extrusive volcanic features.
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World Cup Russia 2018: Blessing or Curse?

World Cup Russia 2018: Blessing or Curse?

This resource looks at some of the social, environmental and economic consequences of hosting the World Cup. It looks specifically at the economic and social benefits and problems associated with running the event. It considers whether it is a safe place to travel to and whether supporters will be looked after. One activity challenges students to imagine they had an older brother who had decided to go to Kaliningrad for the match - would they advice against it or tell him to go? Why?
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World Cup Russia 2018: Where is it all happening?

World Cup Russia 2018: Where is it all happening?

This resource examines the location of the FIFA World Cup in Russia. It looks at where Russia is, generally, then at the locations chosen for the England training camp and the matches in the group stages. It explores the practicality of getting around the place, coping with five different time zones etc. The challenge is to devise Gary Lineker’s travel schedule for him!
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World Cup Russia 2018: Do Big Countries Always Win?

World Cup Russia 2018: Do Big Countries Always Win?

This resource is an opportunity to introduce basic correlation techniques in Key Stage 3. It looks at all the countries that made the final of the World Cup since 1950 along with their current population and HDI. It challenges students to explain anomalies in data (e.g. how come Uruguay did so well when its still a small, less economically developed country) and shows them how to draw their own scatter diagram to explore whether more socio-economically developed countries have more success (as measured by HDI).
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World Cup Russia 2018: Let's Build A Stadium

World Cup Russia 2018: Let's Build A Stadium

This resource looks at the pros and cons of building huge stadiums for global sporting events. It examines what is good and bad about stadiums, looks at some health and safety problems with the stadium at Ekaterinberg. It challenges students to write to the organisers of the World Cup expressing concerns about health and safety at the venues and to think about legacy issues. After showing them what happened to the Olympic stadiums in Athens and Montreal it asks students to examine the proposal that the 2030 World Cup might be stages in Argentina and that several new stadiums should be built. Hopefully, they won’t fall for it!
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Geography of the World Cup (Russia 2018)

Geography of the World Cup (Russia 2018)

This little bundle of four lessons will enable you to keep your students focused during the tournament. It will last as long as the England team do, anyway; about a fortnight, although you could extend some of the activities if we get past the group stages. There’s one lesson that focuses on location, a second on the benefits and problems of running a global sporting event, another on building big stadiums and a fourth on examining hypotheses using correlation.
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Migration Case Study: Ten Pound Poms

Migration Case Study: Ten Pound Poms

This is a different way to approach the topic of migration. The lesson presents students with several sources of information about the ‘Ten Pound Poms’ who left the UK for Australia in the 1950s. Students are challenged to devise a piece of drama that shows that they (i) understand what migration is; (ii) understand what push and pull factors are (iii) can apply their understanding to the example of UK citizens who left for Australia in the 1950s and (iv) appreciate the role that propoganda played in persuading people to leave the UK for Australia.
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Natural Hazards - Getting Started at GCSE

Natural Hazards - Getting Started at GCSE

This pack of materials is a great starting point for anyone who is preparing to teach Natural Hazards, especially if they are following the AQA 9-1 GCSE syllabus. There are thirteen resources here; I guess you would call them ‘lesson embryos’ but TES Resources doesn’t give that option. All the information is here along with lots of diagrams and activities. Each resource is a chunk of relevant information followed by some tasks and questions. If you haven’t got much time, you could simply print a sheet off and get students to read the information and answer the questions but it would be even better to use the resources to develop your own lessons, tranferring the information and images to a PowerPoint, for example, and tailoring it to the needs and abilities of your own students.
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Cold Environments - Getting Started GCSE

Cold Environments - Getting Started GCSE

The ideal pack to get you started on Cold Environments This set of worksheets and notes would be an ideal starting point for teaching this topic. It contains detailed information about the topic, some questions that might be asked of students and, in some cases, some relevant images, tables of data etc. These are the raw materials that get converted into the sets of slides that I sell on TES Resources. The topics are: Introduction to Cold Environments Plants in Cold Environments People in Cold Environments (Siberia) - 2 lessons The Value of Wilderness Managing the Wilderness (Antartica)
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Deserts - Getting Started at GCSE

Deserts - Getting Started at GCSE

This set of resources is designed to be a starting point for a series of lessons on Hot Deserts, as required by the AQA 9-1 GCSE Geography syllabus. These resources are all sets of notes from which you can develop your own lessons. There is detailed information here on all aspects of the topic, along with relevant images and suggestions for activities. Each set of notes would stand alone as a cover lesson as you could simply get the students to read the information and answer the questions. Alternatively, use the resources to develop your own materials according to the needs of your pupils.
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Ecosystems - Getting Started at GCSE

Ecosystems - Getting Started at GCSE

This set of notes would be the ideal starting point for anyone wanting to deliver lessons for AQA’s 9-1 Geography GCSE topic on Ecosystems. There are eleven sets of notes here, each with enough material to deliver a lesson. You could use the material to create your own PowerPoint slides or leave the sheets as cover work as there are questions at the end of every one of them. There are relevant images, tables of data, suggested activites etc. You can tailor this information to the needs of your own classes.
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Coasts - Getting Started at GCSE

Coasts - Getting Started at GCSE

This pack of materials is a great starting point for anyone who is teaching Coasts at GCSE, especially if they are following the AQA 9-1 Geography syllabus, although there is plenty of overlap with other syllabuses, too. The sets of notes contain detailed information, suitable for GCSE level study. There are also images and other resources on the sheets along with a number of suggested activities for each sub-topic. You could just print most of these sheets off and set them as cover work, or, if you have more time or your own class, develop the materials into something more tailored towards the needs of those you teach.
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