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Free teaching resources from HarperCollins Children's Books, publisher of timeless classics such as The Chronicles of Narnia and The Hobbit, as well as perennial family favourites like Judith Kerr’s The Tiger who Came to Tea and Michael Bond's Paddington. HarperCollins Children's Books is also home to some of the most popular authors in children’s literature today, including David Walliams, Derek Landy, Michael Morpurgo, Louise Rennison and Oliver Jeffers.

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Free teaching resources from HarperCollins Children's Books, publisher of timeless classics such as The Chronicles of Narnia and The Hobbit, as well as perennial family favourites like Judith Kerr’s The Tiger who Came to Tea and Michael Bond's Paddington. HarperCollins Children's Books is also home to some of the most popular authors in children’s literature today, including David Walliams, Derek Landy, Michael Morpurgo, Louise Rennison and Oliver Jeffers.
Dr. Seuss | The Cat in the Hat | World Poetry Day Resources
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Dr. Seuss | The Cat in the Hat | World Poetry Day Resources

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Dr. Seuss loved playing with words and rhymes to create fun, imaginative and engaging poetic stories. We hope these lesson ideas help to encourage a love of performance poetry in children. Here is a two-part lesson plan. Firstly, exploration and recital of The Cat in the Hat, and then suggestions on how you can support your class in planning and developing their piece of Dr. Seuss inspired performance poetry.
World Earth Day | The Lorax | Dr. Seuss
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World Earth Day | The Lorax | Dr. Seuss

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This year, World Earth Day (22nd April 2018), is all about telling people to end plastic pollution. The way people make and later get rid of plastic items is bad for the environment. Lots of plastic items are made from petroleum which is believed to contribute towards climate change. Many companies are trying to find ways to make ‘clean’ energy and this will mean that less plastic can be made. When plastic items are thrown away, they cannot be broken down by the bacteria that breaks up most waste. Some plastic items can be recycled but many cannot. These thrown away plastic items end up in land fill sites and even in the ocean. The Lorax is the original eco warrior and his message still rings loud today, in this fable about the dangers of destroying our forests, told in the trademark rhyme of the irrepressible Dr. Seuss. These activities allow children to explore different materials, create an ‘End Plastic Pollution’ poster, create a comic strip, design a reusable shopping bag, storyboard a TV advert plus reading comprehension tasks for upper and lower KS2.
David Baddiel's Birthday Boy - Skateboat
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David Baddiel's Birthday Boy - Skateboat

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Sam made his skateboat using: • Six large planks of wood. • A hammer and some nails. • Six coils of rope. • A roll of gaffer tape. • Two brooms. • Four skateboards. What every day materials can you use to make a boat-raft for the guinea pigs sailing off the coast of Peru towards the UK? Label all the parts you have used, explain what they do and give your boat-raft a name.
Odd Dog Out - A Sausage Among Dogs
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Odd Dog Out - A Sausage Among Dogs

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Come join one busy dog on her journey to find her place in the world in Odd Dog Out, the third sublimely illustrated book from the bestselling, award-winning Rob Biddulph. Can you find the sausage among the dogs?
David Baddiel's Birthday Boy - Ruby
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David Baddiel's Birthday Boy - Ruby

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Try to imagine Sam’s birthdays from Ruby’s perspective. Write Ruby’s diary entry for one day of Sam’s birthday year – you can pick one of the birthdays described in the book, or make up one of your own.
Scarlet and Ivy: Describing the Setting
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Scarlet and Ivy: Describing the Setting

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Thinking about the sense of place, work with a partner to complete this task. a) Does the writer want us to like or dislike the place? Give a reason for your response. b) Why does the writer want the reader to recognise: the size of the place? What words or phrases do you think emphasise this?
Scarlet and Ivy: Diary Writing
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Scarlet and Ivy: Diary Writing

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Either: Write your own diary extracts, written in a chatty informal style using the first person ‘I’, based on some of your own school highlights – you plan to hide this secret diary hidden in a disused locker knowing it will not be found for many years. Or: Write some extracts of Scarlet’s diary written at Rosemoor Asylum for Young females. To help set a sense of place if you are writing as Scarlet (80 years ago) as a prisoner in an Asylum, look at the rough map Scarlet could have managed to draw based on what she can see from her tiny room, other rooms she has been taken to and sounds that she could have heard.
David Baddiel's Birthday Boy - Zada
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David Baddiel's Birthday Boy - Zada

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“Symbolism is the practice or art of using an object or a word to represent an abstract idea. An action, person, place, word, or object can all have a symbolic meaning.” (examples.yourdictionary.com) What symbolism could Zada’s background and her battered skateboard represent in contrast to Sam’s birthday wishes and his brand-new skateboard?
Scarlet and Ivy: Pre-reading
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Scarlet and Ivy: Pre-reading

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Think about mystery stories and poems that you have already read or listened to and films with elements of mystery that you have watched. What ingredients (features) do you expect to find in the mystery story that you are about to read? Put your ideas in the text boxes below. Add more boxes if you need to. When finished compare your ideas with a partner.
Scarlet and Ivy: Significant Moments in the Story
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Scarlet and Ivy: Significant Moments in the Story

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With a partner work on the graph below: 1. To begin this work you first of all need to discuss how you both feel about Ivy and Scarlet in each of the situations taken from the novel that are presented in the boxes. 2. Looking at your result do you empathise with one of the twins more than the other? Why do you think that is?
Michael Morpurgo's Toto - Character Profile
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Michael Morpurgo's Toto - Character Profile

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Task: Now that you’ve met Toto, Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tin Woodman and Lion, choose one of the characters and create a character profile for them. Use information from the text and your own imagination to create the profile. CURRICULUM LINKS: (KS1) Understand both the books that they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by: drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher answering and asking questions CURRICULUM LINKS: (KS2) Understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by: checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context asking questions to improve their understanding
Michael Morpurgo's Toto - Home Is Home
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Michael Morpurgo's Toto - Home Is Home

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TASK: Discuss the phrase ‘Home is home, and home is best’ with your classmates. What do you think it means? What does the word ‘home’ mean to you? Imagine you meet someone who doesn’t know the word ‘home’. Draw and describe your idea of ‘home’. CURRICULUM LINKS: (KS1) Understand both the books that they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by: drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher answering and asking questions CURRICULUM LINKS: (KS2) Understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by: checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context asking questions to improve their understanding