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Having taught History across KS3, 4 and 5 for seventeen years within state education, I have built up quite an extensive set of resources! I’ve spent several years working as a head of department and also spent a year working as a university subject tutor for Schools Direct. I’m currently out of the classroom and supporting my own children through their secondary experience and keeping relevant by becoming an Edexcel examination marker this summer. Planning for fun and hopefully your benefit.

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Having taught History across KS3, 4 and 5 for seventeen years within state education, I have built up quite an extensive set of resources! I’ve spent several years working as a head of department and also spent a year working as a university subject tutor for Schools Direct. I’m currently out of the classroom and supporting my own children through their secondary experience and keeping relevant by becoming an Edexcel examination marker this summer. Planning for fun and hopefully your benefit.
Medieval ideas about cause of disease
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Medieval ideas about cause of disease

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IMPORTANT: Some of these worksheets refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, Medicine through time, c1250-present” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127378 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. The first two lessons of Edexcel 9-1, Medicine Through Time (although in reality this work will take longer than two lessons to do thoroughly). Aims and Objectives: To understand the supernatural and religious explanations of the cause of disease. To understand the rational explanations: the Theory of the Four Humours and the miasma theory; the continuing influence in England of Hippocrates and Galen. The Power Point leads students though all activities with accompanying worksheets. It also provides feedback/answers at intervals. A 12 mark explanation question is introduced and set with a writing frame provided.
Nazi Persecution of the Jews
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Nazi Persecution of the Jews

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This unit of work should take at least 3 hours to complete. The Power Point leads students through all activities with answers when required along with the necessary contextual subject knowledge. All accompanying resources are included. I have previously broken this unit down into three classroom lessons and one final IT lesson where students researched their Holocaust hero. LESSON 1 (Growing anti-Semitism of 1930s): Aims and Objectives: To know Hitler’s racial theories. To use sources to explore how these were put into practice throughout the 1930s in Germany. To empathise with those effected through producing a piece of creative writing in the first-person. LESSON 2 (Life in a ghetto): Aims and Objectives: To know what ghettos were and where they were set up. To understand the purpose of the ghettos. To carry out independent research into conditions inside the ghettos and demonstrate empathetic understanding of what it must have been like to live in one. LESSON 3 (The Final Solution): Aims and Objectives: To know the key events which led to the construction of death camps in Eastern Europe. To understand why these camps were created and how they eased the process of mass murder. To understand the motivation and psychology of those involved. The three lessons focus on the journey of two fictional Jewish children throughout the period 1933-45. A short diary entry is written at the end of each lesson explaining what has happened to them at this stage. Lesson 1 explores the growing anti-Semitism of the 1930s using a range of sources to chart the development and escalation. Lesson 2 explores conditions inside the ghetto using video clips and handout. The final lessons explains the process of the Final Solution and focuses upon how it was able to happen (from a psychological angle). The student booklet for this lesson uses a series of sources to explore the key issues. To end the unit on a more optimistic topic, students consider those who stood up against the Holocaust and create a information poster on their hero of the Holocaust.
The Plains Indians: their beliefs and way of life
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The Plains Indians: their beliefs and way of life

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IMPORTANT: Many of these activities refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, The American West, c1835-c1895” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127309 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: Specification area: The early settlement of the West, c.1835-1862 To understand the Plains Indian’s social and tribal structures, ways of life and means of survival on the Plains. To understand the Plains Indian’s beliefs about land and nature and attitudes towards war and property. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. It also provides feedback/answers at intervals and advice on exam approach. Activities include independent note-taking, card sorting, group discussion, timelines and a narrative account question “Write a narrative account analysing the ways in which the US government policy towards the Plains Indians developed in the period 1835-51.”
Nazi Propaganda and Censorship: Controlling Ideas
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Nazi Propaganda and Censorship: Controlling Ideas

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This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: To understand the work of Goebbels and the Ministry of Propaganda: censorship, Nazi use of media, rallies and sport, including the Berlin Olympics of 1936. To understand Nazi control of culture and the arts, including art, architecture, literature and film. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. Activities include a short Derren Brown video to introduce the idea of mind control, last man standing on forms of propaganda, source comparison of Hitler and Goebbel’s methods, a Goebbels CV (possible homeowork), analysis of short extract from Triumph of the Will looking for examples of propaganda at the Nuremberg Rally, rearching examples of both propaganda and censorship and a Chamber of Culture simulation exercise sorting art work into keep and dismiss with discussion.
Renaissance Ideas about Cause Disease
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Renaissance Ideas about Cause Disease

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IMPORTANT: Some of these worksheets refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, Medicine through time, c1250-present” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127378 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3-4 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate and whether you decide to write the exam answer in full. Aims and Objectives: To understand continuity and change in explanations of the cause of disease and illness. To understand the new scientific approach, including the work of Thomas Sydenham in improving diagnosis. To understand the influence of the printing press and the work of the Royal Society on the transmission of ideas. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying worksheet. It also provides feedback/answers at intervals. Activities include card sort stater, comprehension questions/note-taking, think words, 4 mark exam question and essay planning for a 12 mark explanation question (could also be answered in full).
Why was there an Industrial Revolution in Britain?
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Why was there an Industrial Revolution in Britain?

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This KS3 unit should take around two hours + one homework to complete. The Power Point leads students through all activities with all accompanying resources included. Aims and Objectives: To know and understand the main causes of the British Industrial Revolution. To consider which factors are more/less important and how they worked together. To consider the importance of individuals and reach a judgement on how achieved the most. Activities include an odd one out starter, research and mind map activity on the causes with a linking exercise as an extension, group research and information poster on one individual who contributed towards the Industrial Revolution, followed by a carousel/information sharing activity. Finally, there is a class vote on who contributed the most, followed by a homework/paragraph answer explaning who the student thinks contributed ther most.
Was Henry VIII a good or bad king?
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Was Henry VIII a good or bad king?

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This KS3 unit of work should take around four lessons to complete. It includes the assessment for the unit on the Tudors. The Power Point leads students through all of the activities with accompanying resources. Aims and Objectives: To learn some facts about Henry VIII and decide whether these make him a good or a bad king. To consider why we have different opinions about Henry VIII and how our sources aren’t completely reliable. To use (critically) a range of different types of sources to reach a reliable judgement on the key question. The first lesson introduces the idea of source reliability by drawing inferences from the Holbein portrait and then considering two source samples- one which supports and another which contradicts the painting. Students are asked to consider why they are different. We then study the six wives of Henry, completing a cut and stick activity (wife to fate) and begin to make our notes on whether he was a good or bad king. The second lesson covers the break with Rome and then a card sort, adding further information to our good v. bad table. The extension activity asks students to use a range of resources to add to their notes. I used our class textbooks but also informatioin that I took from BBC schools. This is also a good homework task at this stage as it can be completd using the Internet. The third lesson is where there students prepare for the assessment using a collection of eight sources. An SEN version of the source sheets is also included. The fourth lesson is the assessment write-up. The students are asked to use both the sources and their own knowledge to present a balanced argument before reaching a final judgement. A mark scheme is included.
Social Change in the Weimar Republic, 1924-29
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Social Change in the Weimar Republic, 1924-29

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This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: To understand changes in the standard of living, including wages, housing, unemployment insurance. To understand changes in the position of women in work, politics and leisure. To understand cultural changes: developments in architecture, art and the cinema. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. Activities include an inference starter on living conditions, summarising/condensing information on changes in living standards, source comparison of women in early 1900s and 1920s, categorising evidence to show how society did and did not change for women, an extension diary entry for a young German woman (possible homework), defining key artistic terms and identifying examples of these artistic trends in a range of sources including art, architecture and film, analysing areas of art that might have come under criticism from the left and right-wing, a four mark interpretation source question and a final Weimar Republic revision quiz.
Trench Warfare on the Western Front
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Trench Warfare on the Western Front

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This KS3 unit of work covers several lessons and I’ve generally been quite flexible and allowed classes who are particularly engaged with the topic and research to spend longer on it. The lessons build up the students’ knowledge and understanding of trench structure, purpose, conditions and warfare. The booklet ensures that all students know the key facts surrounding this topic with the Power Point leading students through all of the activities. A few different starter activities are included at the end of the Power Point which can be selected according to the length of time spent on the main activities. Having worked through the key facts and background, the students undertake more independent research. Support materials are included for weaker classes, such as research tables and a source booklet which covers all of the key areas. I have used a great variety of resources depending upon each class- textbooks, library lessons, Internet, videos etc. Once the research is complete, the students complete the Trench Diary assessment task which is levelled according to subject knowledge and understanding of cause/effect. A mark scheme is included. Support materials are also included in this pack, such as a plan outline for students who require a little more guidance and a writing frame for the less able.
World War Two: Full Unit of Study
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World War Two: Full Unit of Study

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This KS3 unit of study should take around 18-20 hours to complete. There is a Power Point included for every lesson which leads students through the activities and provides advice and guidance where required. In teaching/loose chronological order, the lessons include: Communism, Democracy and Dictatorship: Introducing political concepts and their 1930s context. The Causes of WW2. The Main Turning Points of WW2. The Dunkirk Evacuation: How accurate are film portrayals? How Dangerous were the D-Day Landings? How were Commonwealth soldiers treated during WW2? What was it like to be a young person in Nazi Germany? The Persecution of the Jews: Nazi Germany, Ghettos and The Final Solution. Was “Blitz Spirit” real? The British Home Front. Why was Churchill a great war leader? What was it like to be evacuated? The Nazi defeat in Europe and aftermath of WW2. Should the US have dropped the A-bomb? There are a great range of activities including discussion, debate, source analysis, independent research, creative writing and formal assessment. Please refer to individual lessons for more detail. The D-Day lesson introduces GCSE-style source questions (Edexcel) and the Dunkirk lesson assesses cross-reference with a mark scheme provided.
Children in the Mills
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Children in the Mills

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Students use a collection of primary sources to investigate conditions for children working in cotton mills during the Industrial Revolution. These demonstrate both positive and negative aspects. They are encouraged to consider the reliability of each source. They then write up their findings in a balanced government report, making critical use of the source material to reach an overall judgement on whether child labour should be banned. A writing frame is also included for weaker students.
Black Death: Treatment and Prevention
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Black Death: Treatment and Prevention

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IMPORTANT: Some of these worksheets refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1 History, Medicine through time, c1250-present” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127378 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 2 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: To understand how people dealt with the Black Death, 1348-49; approaches to treatment and attempts to prevent its spread. The Power Point leads students through all activities with regular feedback and accompanying worksheets. These include a starter fact file, information categorisation/analysis and a final TV news report group competition followed by the textbook end of unit recall quiz. Having already completed two full written assessments as part of the unit, the competition injects a bit of fun.
World War Two Evacuation
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World War Two Evacuation

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This KS3 unit should take around 2 hours to complete depending upon how detailed you want the final letter to be. The Power Point leads students through all activities, giving answers when required. All accompanying resources are included. I showed my classes an extract from the film Goodnight Mr Tom as part of their research, although I have not included a clip here and you would need to source your own DVD or find a clip on YouTube. This would officially make your department the only one in the country not to have this DVD in a store cupboard. Aims and Objectives: To know the main facts surrounding evacuation- who, what, why, where and when? To understand the great range of experiences and types of people effected, considering the impact upon their lives. To create a piece of empathetic writing exploring these ideas. Activities include a short video starter where students use the clip to answer the who, what, why, where, when and how questions about evacuation. A cloze exercise quickly summarises the key facts. Students then sort the attitude/feeling cards from positive to negative. Using the source booklet, they carry out independent research into the range of evacuees, hosts and feelings/attitudes expressed. They are to try to find concrete examples to illustrate the attitudes/feelings on the cards. The following lesson has a quick recap quiz. Students then demonstrate their understanding through writing an evacuee letter home, describing the process of evacuation and expressing thoughts/feelings to show empathetic understanding.
Abolition of Slavery
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Abolition of Slavery

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This KS3 lesson should take around two hours to complete. The Power Point leads students through all activities and accompanying resources are included. Aims and Objectives: To think about and discuss the main reasons both for and against banning slavery (from our own opinions and ideas held at the actual time). To put these arguments into categories and rank their importance. To know the key events which led to the banning of slavery and sort this information into key factors. To write up our findings in an essay style. Students evaluate to arguments for and against abolishing slavery across the British Empire. They categorise and rank the various reasons historically given. They then categorise the key reasons into those relating to the economy, the slaves themselves and the Abolitionists. This leads into an essay-style written assessment. A writing frame and mark scheme is also provided. To assist with the review of this assessment, there are explained samples paragraphs and a conclusion.
How did William control England? Feudal system, repression and Domesday Book
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How did William control England? Feudal system, repression and Domesday Book

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This KS3 lesson should take at least one hour to complete. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources included. Aims and Objectives: To consider the problems which William faced immediately after the Battle of Hastings. To understand that he applied different methods to each of these problems. To empathise with people who lived through the Norman Conquest. Activities include a think, pair, share starter considering what William’s potential problems might be and how he may address them. His problems are then summarised as 1) Controlling population 2) Resistance in the north 3) Collecting taxes and tackled separately. An extended source is analysed to understand how the resistance in the north was handled. The nature of hierarchies is introduced via modern-day examples before students complete their own diagram of the feudal system using the structure and jumbled phrases. An SEN version is also included. Students consider who they would most/least like to have been. A five minute video is finally used to explain the Domesday Book.
How Britain changed 1750-1900 (3 lessons)
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How Britain changed 1750-1900 (3 lessons)

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Three one-hour lessons with all activities explained on Power Point. The focus is on continuity and change between 1750-1900. Once students understand the basic changes which took place during the Industrial Revolution, they carry out more detailed research and analysis using the information provided. They also develop their knowledge of key terms for this unit via a homework and key terms test. The lessons end with an assessed piece of writing analysing areas of change and continuity (writing frame and mark sheet included)
Why did the Allies win WW1?
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Why did the Allies win WW1?

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This KS3 lesson provides an overview of events and then analyses the reasons for the Allied victory in WW1. The Power Point leads students through all of the activities. After a brief introductory video, the students rate the level of the Allies’ success through seven closing stages. Having gained an overview of events, students then carry out a range of analytical activities using the cause cards provided. They are asked to group the cards into Allies’ strengths vs. German’ weaknesses, long vs. short term and then group them into social, military and economic. After reading a worked example of an explanation of military reasons, students select either social or economic reasons and produce an explanatory paragraph to demonstrate their understanding.
Was Blitz Spirit real? The British home front
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Was Blitz Spirit real? The British home front

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This lesson uses contemporary sources, including photographs, news reel and written accounts to investigate the Blitz and whether “Blitz Spirit” was real or simply an example of propaganda. In the starter, students contrast images of “Blitz Spirit” with an account of the true horror of the Blitz. They consider the propaganda content of a British news reel clip. Students then complete a card sort activity by placing sources in a line to consider those which support the idea of “Blitz Spirit” and those which discredit it. They can then write-up their overall verdict. The home work activity asks students to study a range of WW2 images, considering which they would censor and which they would publish.
Medieval prevention and treatment of disease
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Medieval prevention and treatment of disease

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IMPORTANT: Some of these worksheets refer to the textbook"Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, Medicine through time, c1250-present" (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127378 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3-4 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: To understand the approaches to prevention and treatment and their connection with ideas about diseases and illness: religious actions, bloodletting and purging, purifying the air, and the use of remedies. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying worksheets. These include card sorts, analysis/categorisation of written notes, paired/whole class discussion, knowledge questions and note-taking. It also provides feedback/answers at intervals. It leads up to a 16 mark judgement question with explanation and support. A writing frame is also included if required.
Growing Nazi support, 1929-32
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Growing Nazi support, 1929-32

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This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: To understand the growth of unemployment- its cause and impact. The failure of successive Weimar governments to deal with unemployment from 1929 to January 1933. The growth of support for the Communist Party. To understand the reasons for the growth in support for the Nazi Party, including the appeal of Hitler and the Nazis, the effects of propaganda and the work of the SA. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. Activities include starter video analysis on why the Wall Street Crash helped the Nazis, source analysis on the effects of the depression, a cut and stick activity categorising the effects, comprehension questions on the failing of the government and the rise of extreme parties, photo source analysis on Hitler’s appeal, note-taking on this topic with provided grid, card sort activity on reasons Nazis appealed to different sections of society and a full interpretation exam question with advice, examples and writing frame.