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Having taught History across KS3, 4 and 5 for seventeen years within state education, I have built up quite an extensive set of resources! I’ve spent several years working as a head of department and also spent a year working as a university subject tutor for Schools Direct. I’m currently out of the classroom and supporting my own children through their secondary experience and keeping relevant by becoming an Edexcel examination marker this summer. Planning for fun and hopefully your benefit.

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Having taught History across KS3, 4 and 5 for seventeen years within state education, I have built up quite an extensive set of resources! I’ve spent several years working as a head of department and also spent a year working as a university subject tutor for Schools Direct. I’m currently out of the classroom and supporting my own children through their secondary experience and keeping relevant by becoming an Edexcel examination marker this summer. Planning for fun and hopefully your benefit.
The destruction of the Plains Indians' way of life, 1876-95
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The destruction of the Plains Indians' way of life, 1876-95

(1)
IMPORTANT: Many of these activities refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, The American West, c1835-c1895” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127309 ad will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3-4 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: Specification area: The destruction of the Plains Indians’ way of life, 1876-95 To understand the hunting and extermination of the buffalo. To understand the Plains Indians’ life on the reservation. To understand the significance of changing government attitudes to the Plains Indians, including the Dawes Act 1887 and the closure of the Indian Frontier. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. It also provides feedback/answers at intervals. Activities include inference work, time line creation, summary note-taking, diary extract of a Plains Indian child in a government boarding school, analysis of success v. failure of Dawes Act, Section A explanation 16 mark question with advice.
What were the main events of WW2?
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What were the main events of WW2?

(1)
This KS3 unit of work aims to contextualise the unit of study on WW2 by providing an overview of the key events. It should take between 1-2 hours to complete. I use it near the start of the course before focusing on certain events as depth studies. The Power Point leads students through all activities with all accompanying resources included. Aims and Objectives: To know the main events of WW2. To understand why certain events are of particular significance as turning points. To make a judgement on which events were the most important turning points. Activities include a fun competition starter which recaps on the causes of WW2. Students try to guess the words using a series of images (non historical- just sound right). Having defined a turning-point, students then use the detailed information booklet to make brief notes on the significance of each key event. Finally, they produce a paragraph answer explaining which event was the most significant and why.
The American West, c1835-c1895 Edexcel 9-1 Complete Unit
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The American West, c1835-c1895 Edexcel 9-1 Complete Unit

9 Resources
IMPORTANT: This Edexcel 9-1 History GCSE unit is structured around the textbook "Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, The American West, c1835-c1895 (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127309. The lessons will not be usable without a class set of these textbooks. However, if you’re looking to change course and can’t face all the fresh planning then I can guarantee that this bundle covers the entire specification with all supporting resources and assessment opportunities throughout. For a summary of activities etc. please see individual items. Every section of the specification is supported with a Power Point which leads students through all of the activities and includes feedback/answers. Every worksheet and resource referred to is included in the bundle.
How do Catholic and Protestant views differ?
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How do Catholic and Protestant views differ?

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Before looking at the reigns of each Tudor monarch in KS3, I start with this lesson underlining the differences between Catholicism and Protestantism. It really helps with the understanding of each ruler’s actions later in the Tudor course. Aims and Objectives: To know how a Catholic and Protestant church look different. To know the main differences in beliefs between the two types of Christianity. To understand why Catholics and Protestants practised their faith differently and why they both felt so strongly about this. After a short parody video on the Reformation, we start by comparing and analysing the diagrams of a Catholic and Protestant church. Students then complete the colour-code activity setting out the different beliefs. There’s an SEN version of the colour-coding which I replace the longer version with when teaching nurture groups. Students then demonstrate their understanding by creating a poster supporting one of the denominations. This is generally set as homework and as a competition. The plenary asks students to identify whether a range of beliefs are Catholic or Protestant using the “C/P” cards to ensure they all have to get involved.
Oliver Cromwell: Hero or Villain?
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Oliver Cromwell: Hero or Villain?

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This KS3 unit of work should take around 3 lessons to complete. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources included. Aims and Objectives: To know the key facts about Oliver Cromwell- who he was and what he did. To use sources critically to learn more about opinions on Oliver Cromwell. To use our evidence to reach a balanced judgement on whether he was a hero or a villain. Activities include a starter which uses the Monty Python Oliver Cromwell song to recall key facts. Students are then unknowingly issued with a set of either positive or negative sources to create a quick thought-shower and feedback before exploring the reasons why their ideas about Cromwell are so different. We then colour-code Cromwell’s actions into “hero” and “villain” before analysing a range of sources to consider whether they show him in a positive or negative light and how far we trust them. Students then complete an assessed piece of writing, using these sources and their knowledge to answer the key question “Oliver Cromwell: Hero or Villain?”. A writing frame is including, along with a mark scheme which assesses their knowledge/understanding, use of sources and judgement.
The Stuarts and Witchcraft
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The Stuarts and Witchcraft

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This KS3 unit should take around two lessons to complete. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. Aims and Objectives: To know why the Stuarts and King James I were so obsessed with witchcraft. To know how witches were spotted and tested. To decide how fair these trials were. To balance our view of the Stuarts by considering their scientific advances. The first lesson starts with a mystery image of the trial of Mary Sutton by water. We then examine King James’ theories surrounding witchcraft and consider how the Stuarts’ obsession also linked in with the religious tensions of the time. Students read the passage on the famous Pendle Witch Trial and answer the comprehension questions. There are a lot of individuals involved in this event, so I generally work through it with them. They link King James’ witch spotting techniques to complete a grid determining how many of these criteria are met by each of the suspects. Students then make their on verdict using their grids which will tend to by “guilty”. However, when questioned, most students are already questioning thee methods and feel they were not guilty. The second lesson introduces Matthew Hopkins and the idea of witchfinding. The Horrible Histories witchfinder advert brilliantly demonstrates how ludicrous this process was. The students then complete a piece of writing whereby they go back in time and defend those who were accused of witchcraft using modern-day understanding. We end the unit by balancing out the Stuarts’ superstition with some work on their scientific advances. This worksheet can also be set as a homework.
Edexcel Crusades AS/2 Revision Notes
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Edexcel Crusades AS/2 Revision Notes

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Includes a set of revision notes for each area of the specification. These notes are used in conjunction with my full revision guide. In contrast to the full guide, they follow a more analytical structure which matches previous exam questions. The notes can be used separately or put together into one booklet. I integrated previous exam questions and mark schemes which had been sorted by topic rather than by date set. Students used the full guide and revision notes to prepare essay plans on each unit in preparation for the exam.
The Plains Indians: their beliefs and way of life
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The Plains Indians: their beliefs and way of life

(1)
IMPORTANT: Many of these activities refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, The American West, c1835-c1895” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127309 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: Specification area: The early settlement of the West, c.1835-1862 To understand the Plains Indian’s social and tribal structures, ways of life and means of survival on the Plains. To understand the Plains Indian’s beliefs about land and nature and attitudes towards war and property. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. It also provides feedback/answers at intervals and advice on exam approach. Activities include independent note-taking, card sorting, group discussion, timelines and a narrative account question “Write a narrative account analysing the ways in which the US government policy towards the Plains Indians developed in the period 1835-51.”
How Britain changed 1750-1900 (3 lessons)
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How Britain changed 1750-1900 (3 lessons)

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Three one-hour lessons with all activities explained on Power Point. The focus is on continuity and change between 1750-1900. Once students understand the basic changes which took place during the Industrial Revolution, they carry out more detailed research and analysis using the information provided. They also develop their knowledge of key terms for this unit via a homework and key terms test. The lessons end with an assessed piece of writing analysing areas of change and continuity (writing frame and mark sheet included)
What were conditions like in industrial towns?
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What were conditions like in industrial towns?

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Activities to develop the students’ understanding of conditions in industrial towns through source inference and analysis (cause and effect). Students then demonstrate their understanding through creating their own advisory poster to help people stay safe in a Victorian city.
Children in the Mills
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Children in the Mills

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Students use a collection of primary sources to investigate conditions for children working in cotton mills during the Industrial Revolution. These demonstrate both positive and negative aspects. They are encouraged to consider the reliability of each source. They then write up their findings in a balanced government report, making critical use of the source material to reach an overall judgement on whether child labour should be banned. A writing frame is also included for weaker students.
The British Sector of the Western Front
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The British Sector of the Western Front

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IMPORTANT: Some of these activities refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, Medicine through time, c1250-present” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127378 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3+ lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: To learn about the context of the British sector of the Western Front and the theatre of war in Flanders and northern France. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying worksheets and resources. It also provides feedback/answers/advice at intervals which is rather useful when covering so much detailed content. Activities include a starter on source usefulness and enquiry areas, background event ordering, analysing diagrams of trench structure and photographs/written source illustrating problems with transport and communication. There is also an independent note-taking section on the key events following a worked example.
Medical problems, wounds and injuries on the Western Front
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Medical problems, wounds and injuries on the Western Front

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IMPORTANT: Some of these activities refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, Medicine through time, c1250-present” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127378 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit technically covers 3-4 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability-work rate. However, as this is the point in the course where I introduce the 8 mark source evaluation question and the follow-up question, it could easily take a lot longer if all of the practice opportunities are carried out in full. Aims and Objectives: To learn about the main medical problems, wounds and injuries that were faced on the Western Front and how they were dealt with. To learn how to answer the source evaluation exam question and the source follow-up question. The Power Point leads students through all of the activities with accompanying worksheets. It also provides regular feedback and answers which is useful with so much content being covered. Activities include source analysis video starter, independent note-taking, scenario diagnosis of case studies plenary, a developed analysis of Dulce et Decorum using video, a detailed introduction to the source questions with my technique for answering them (poster and handout to reinforce this), source evaluation work on gas attacks and problems with transport, follow-up source question and opportunities for peer assessment.
Was Henry VIII a good or bad king?
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Was Henry VIII a good or bad king?

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This KS3 unit of work should take around four lessons to complete. It includes the assessment for the unit on the Tudors. The Power Point leads students through all of the activities with accompanying resources. Aims and Objectives: To learn some facts about Henry VIII and decide whether these make him a good or a bad king. To consider why we have different opinions about Henry VIII and how our sources aren’t completely reliable. To use (critically) a range of different types of sources to reach a reliable judgement on the key question. The first lesson introduces the idea of source reliability by drawing inferences from the Holbein portrait and then considering two source samples- one which supports and another which contradicts the painting. Students are asked to consider why they are different. We then study the six wives of Henry, completing a cut and stick activity (wife to fate) and begin to make our notes on whether he was a good or bad king. The second lesson covers the break with Rome and then a card sort, adding further information to our good v. bad table. The extension activity asks students to use a range of resources to add to their notes. I used our class textbooks but also informatioin that I took from BBC schools. This is also a good homework task at this stage as it can be completd using the Internet. The third lesson is where there students prepare for the assessment using a collection of eight sources. An SEN version of the source sheets is also included. The fourth lesson is the assessment write-up. The students are asked to use both the sources and their own knowledge to present a balanced argument before reaching a final judgement. A mark scheme is included.
Ranching and the cattle industry, 1862-76
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Ranching and the cattle industry, 1862-76

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IMPORTANT: Some of these activities refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, The American West, c1835-c1895” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127309 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 3-4 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: Specification area: Ranching and the cattle industry, 1862-76 To understand the cattle industry and factors in its growth, including the roles of Iliff, McCoy and Goodnight, the significance of Abilene and the increasing use of the railroad network. To understand the impact of changes in ranching on the work of the cowboy. To understand the rivalry between ranchers and homesteaders. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. It also provides feedback and answers at intervals. Activities include key words, timeline analysis/colour-coding, independent note taking, a narrativ account 8 mark exam question, video Q&A, letter from a cowboy describing his first spring round-up, an explain 2 consequences (of ranching on the Plains) exam question.
Conflict and tension in the American West, 1876-95
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Conflict and tension in the American West, 1876-95

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IMPORTANT: Many of these activities refer to the textbook “Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History, The American West, c1835-c1895” (editor Leonard A. and published by Pearson) ISBN 9781292127309 and will not be usable without a copy of this text. This Edexcel 9-1 GCSE unit covers around 4 lessons depending upon your class and their overall ability/work rate. Aims and Objectives: Specification area: Conflict and tension in the American West, 1876-1895 To understand the extent of solutions to problems of law and order: sheriffs and marshals. The significance of Billy the Kid, OK Corral (1881), Wyatt Earp. To understand the range wars, including the Johnson County War of 1892. To understand the conflict with the Plains Indians: the Battle of the Little Big Horn, 1876 and its impact; the Wounded Knee Massacre, 1890. The Power Point leads students through all activities with accompanying resources. It also provides feedback/answers at intervals. Activities include group discussion on the causes of lawlessness analysis of Billy the Kid and Wyatt Earp using summary written material, card sort on the Johnson County War, video Q&A on the Battle of Little Bighorn, timeline analysis of the battle, Wounded Knee Massacre storyboard and Facebook posts exercise on reaction.
Why did the Allies win WW1?
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Why did the Allies win WW1?

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This KS3 lesson provides an overview of events and then analyses the reasons for the Allied victory in WW1. The Power Point leads students through all of the activities. After a brief introductory video, the students rate the level of the Allies’ success through seven closing stages. Having gained an overview of events, students then carry out a range of analytical activities using the cause cards provided. They are asked to group the cards into Allies’ strengths vs. German’ weaknesses, long vs. short term and then group them into social, military and economic. After reading a worked example of an explanation of military reasons, students select either social or economic reasons and produce an explanatory paragraph to demonstrate their understanding.
Field Marshal Haig and the Battle of the Somme
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Field Marshal Haig and the Battle of the Somme

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This KS3 series of lessons investigate whether or not Field Marshal Haig deserves the nickname “The Butcher of the Somme” leading into a final source assessment. The Power Point leads students through all of the activities with accompanying student task booklet. Two short video clips are used to introduce the way in which Haig has been portrayed and the true nature of the Battle of the Somme. A simple cloze exercise outlines the key facts before a collection of sources are analysed to determine whether or not Haig does deserve to be known as “The Butcher”. This leads into a formal assessment where the students are asked to use the sources critically to produced a balanced written answer with a final judgment. A writing frame and mark scheme are included.
WW1 Christmas Truce
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WW1 Christmas Truce

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This nice Christmas themed lesson has helped me to keep both SLT happy with its academic integrity and the students happy with a bit of Christmas cheer in that final week of term! We introduce the 1914 truce with the Sainsburys advert. The basic factual recall quiz afterwards is a nice chocolate winning opportunity. Students then cross-reference the advert’s idealised portrayal with a series of sources to reach a final judgement on how accurate the Sainsburys’ portrayal was. This is written up in the form of a response from the Advertising Standards Agency to a complaint about the advert not being accurate.
WW1 Propaganda
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WW1 Propaganda

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This KS3 lesson introduces the concept of propaganda and censorship. The Power Point leads students through all of the activities with accompanying worksheets. The famous Lord Kitchener poster is used to introduce the methods used in propaganda. Students define propaganda and censorship before thought-showering types and availability in WW1. In small groups they freeze-frame a range of propaganda images and discuss their messages/methods. With livelier classes at the end of the day, I’ve sometimes gone straight onto the worksheet analysis and left this part out though. Students then make their own propaganda posters using the techniques they have learnt. I use this as a competition and display. This will either take one lesson and a homework or two lessons.