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Ms W's English Shop

I am an English specialist and Head of English, Drama and Media. I am passionate about supporting all students to access the English curriculum, to achieve at the highest possible levels in their exams and to love the subject. I currently teach AQA and have created lots of full schemes of work which develop exam skills and independence. All my resources have been tried and refined in the classroom; I hope that you will find them useful and welcome all constructive feedback and dialogue.

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I am an English specialist and Head of English, Drama and Media. I am passionate about supporting all students to access the English curriculum, to achieve at the highest possible levels in their exams and to love the subject. I currently teach AQA and have created lots of full schemes of work which develop exam skills and independence. All my resources have been tried and refined in the classroom; I hope that you will find them useful and welcome all constructive feedback and dialogue.
Jekyll & Hyde GCSE Revision Guide & Workbook
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Jekyll & Hyde GCSE Revision Guide & Workbook

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A twenty-two page revision guide on The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Contains a combination of information and activities for students to work through, taking them back to the text and asking them to think deeply and independently about characters, language, themes and context. Once completed, the activities then act as a further revision resource for students. This was written with the new AQA GCSE specification in mind and has information on the AQA assessment objectives, but beyond that would be useful for revising the text for any exam board. The booklet includes sections on: The AQA paper and assessment objectives Author Biography Plot Themes & Context Character function, traits and quotations Form and Narrative Structure Language and Structure Nineteenth Century Art and the unconscious mind Setting Practice extract question I have found this very useful as a homework pack for a half term/term, which can be reflected on and further discussed and developed in lessons. Differentiation is inbuilt - for example, a range of quotations is provided for the character activities. Students can analyse and learn a selection of these, or all of them, depending on skill level. A straightforward author biography is provided which will contain sufficient context for some students, but context is returned to in much greater depth in the 'themes and context' section of the booklet to provide stretch and challenge. The section on 19th century art could be used as an optional extension for targeted students or be used to challenge a whole class to develop their contextual knowledge even further. Any questions, please just ask. Thanks.
Chaucer Context Research Activity
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Chaucer Context Research Activity

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A research activity on Chaucer which requires students to work independently and work through different levels of questions. (I’ve used SOLO Taxonomy to provide a range of questions). The resources included are: a detailed contextual booklet on Chaucer’s life, The Canterbury Tales, and a history of Pilgrimage; differentiated questions which require students to read the booklet and do their own research. This is an effective introductory lesson for A Level study of Chaucer and provides much of the contextual knowledge required by OCR.
Symbols & Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird
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Symbols & Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird

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A 2-page resource which explains the keys symbols in To Kill A Mockingbird, and their meaning. The symbols covered are: - The Mockingbird - The Snowman - Flowers - Miss Maudie’s Burning House - The Mad Dog - Gothic symbolism, the Southern Gothic and The Radley Place. Images are used for each symbol to make the resource visually appealing. This resource is ideal for revision or for first-teaching when introducing symbolism.
To Kill A Mockingbird GCSE Bundle
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To Kill A Mockingbird GCSE Bundle

6 Resources
Six resources on To Kill A Mockingbird - a mixture of activities including: - Full introductory lesson - Dramatic foils activity - Context handout (for first teaching or revision) - Symbolism handout (on key symbols such as the Mockingbird, the snowman, flowers and the mad dog. - ‘Mockingbirds’ activity focusing on all the characters who could be said to be symbols of innocence and vulnerability in the novel. - Practice exam/essay questions on the novel with a section on characters and one on themes. Please see the individual resource descriptions for further details. Thank you.
48 Lesson Animal Farm AQA GCSE Scheme of Work - Fully Resourced
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48 Lesson Animal Farm AQA GCSE Scheme of Work - Fully Resourced

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• Fully-resourced 12 Week Animal Farm Scheme. • 48 lessons including fully-planned and resourced assessments. Includes 8 peer/self-assessments, 4 teacher assessments and 4 structured D.I.R.T lessons. • The content is deliberately designed to be challenging, in terms of concepts, vocabulary and context. An illustration of activities includes: Mini Lectures, frequent assessment and opportunities for extended writing, research lessons, contextual source material drawn from GCSE History, high level modelling materials and frequent use and repetition of sophisticated vocabulary. • There is a focus on mastery of key technical writing skills. Writing skills lessons & activities are interleaved to prepare students for the SPaG element of the AQA GCSE qualifications. There are a number of fluency activities. • A ‘language through literature’ approach is taken, with the inclusion of reading and writing tasks clearly linked to AQA English GCSE Language Papers 1 & 2. • Homework is inbuilt and is called Independent Study; it is designed to be challenging. It is an essential element of the scheme and linked class activities are based upon independent study tasks. The aim is to improve students’ independent study skills, reform their view of ‘homework’ so that they understand its central role in their learning and significantly improve the rate and quality of completion. The level of challenge increases over the course of the scheme. • D.I.R.T lessons are planned into the scheme for the lesson after the teacher assessment; however, this is a ‘floating’ lesson and there is flexibility in when it is delivered to accommodate marking. It should ideally be delivered within 4 lessons of the assessment. The D.I.R.T lessons will include both structured and independent tasks. • All resources are included with the exception of the following, which I cannot include for copyright reasons: 1. The OCR GCSE Russian History Source Pack which is required for some Independent Study and 2. The article required in Week 5, Lesson 1, ‘The Ghosts of Yalta Still Haunt The World’ by Richard Ebbing. Both resources can be found on Google. • Detailed teaching instructions & differentiation suggestions are contained within the notessection of each PowerPoint slide. • For referencing and page number purposes, the Penguin Classics 2000 edition of the text has been used.
19th Century Short Stories Questions
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19th Century Short Stories Questions

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Three sets of questions on the short stories 'News of the Engagement', 'The Unexpected' and 'Hop Frog' from the New Windmill collection. The questions are designed to be done after a first reading of the story to check and develop students' understanding of the plot, context and characters. There is a combination of comprehension and analysis questions. This would make an effective classwork, homework or flipped learning task if you asked students to read the story independently before completing the questions. Designed for teaching of the New Windmill 19th Century Short Stories on the Edexcel IGCSE.
Romeo & Juliet Quotations Revision Table
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Romeo & Juliet Quotations Revision Table

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A double-sided A3 quotations revision resource for Romeo and Juliet, organising key quotations by theme and character. Characters run down the side of the table and themes run across the top. Where a quotation is relevant to both a theme and a character, it is included in the relevant square. 44 of the 88 squares are filled with one or often numerous quotations. The other squares are blank for students to fill in their own additional quotations as part of the revision process. The characters covered are: Romeo, Juliet, Lady Capulet, Lord Capulet, The Nurse, Friar Lawrence, The Montagues, Mercutio, Benvolio, Tybalt and some quotations from minor characters and the Chorus. Themes covered are: Love & Sex, Fate, Death, Conflict & Reconciliation, Parent/Child Relationships, Friendship, Youth & Age, Marriage (linked to women's roles). My students said that they found this a useful and detailed overview of key quotations which helped them to make connections between themes and characters in their revision.
'Mockingbirds' Activity in To Kill A Mockingbird
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'Mockingbirds' Activity in To Kill A Mockingbird

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This activity is designed to get students thinking about all the different characters who are 'mockingbirds' in the novel, i.e. symbols of vulnerability and innocence. There are two versions of the handout included - the first has blank space for students to write in their own ideas about each character and the second is the 'teacher' version which is filled in with an explanation of how each character is a mockingbird. The characters covered are: Boo Radley, Tom Robinson, Dill, Walter Cunningham, Atticus, Scout, Jem, Helen Robinson, Tim Johnson (the dog) and Mayella Ewell. I found that the blank version was a useful activity to get students thinking independently first and the 'teacher' version then provided them with all the details they require for revision and essay-writing.
The Bloody Chamber - The Erl-King Questions
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The Bloody Chamber - The Erl-King Questions

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Twelve challenging questions on 'The Erl-King' by Angela Carter (part of The Bloody Chamber collection) designed to be completed after reading the story. Created for the OCR A Level spec which heavily weights context and requires knowledge of critics, so these questions develop both of those skills.
Bloody Chamber - 'Puss-in-Boots' Commedia Dell'arte Research Lesson
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Bloody Chamber - 'Puss-in-Boots' Commedia Dell'arte Research Lesson

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A research-based lesson to introduce the Commedia Dell'Arte stock characters which Carter draws on in 'Puss-in-Boots'. This could be completed before or after reading the story (although bear in mind that one of the questions asks students to make links with the story). Students will need access to the internet (this can be done on phones if necessary). The resources included are - slides with instructions, a research pack with questions on each stock character for students to complete, and a poster of each stock character for your classroom walls.
Bloody Chamber Essentialism & Essay Writing Lesson
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Bloody Chamber Essentialism & Essay Writing Lesson

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This lesson introduces essentialism and teaches students how to write an effective thesis/introduction to a comparative essay on essentialism and The Bloody Chamber. Designed for the OCR A Level English Literature comparative literary studies module. The resources include a fun 'odd-one-out' starter on stereotyping and essentialism, to be followed by discussion, a resource which clearly explains essentialism, a model thesis comparing two gothic texts (The Fall of the House of Usher and The Tell-Tale Heart) for students to read and dissect, a comparative essay question on essentialism and The Bloody Chamber and a paired activity in which students write a thesis in response to this question. The full essay is then written for homework. This lesson works well early-on in the A Level course as it gives students confidence in how to approach a comparative essay.
A Doll's House Problem Play Handout
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A Doll's House Problem Play Handout

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A handout which examines A Doll's House as a problem play, and looks at the evidence for it as a feminist play and a tragedy. Includes quotations from Ibsen himself and the critic Tornqvist. A useful resource for understanding genre and meeting the context assessment objective on the OCR A Level spec.
Dark Matter Resources
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Dark Matter Resources

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A selection of resources for teaching the novel Dark Matter to Key Stage Three. The resources included are: 1. A one-page set of analysis questions for Chapters 3 & 4, with a point, evidence explain model to show students how to write analytical paragraphs. 2. A creative writing lesson focused on using pathetic fallacy inspired by Dark Matter, including a group carousel activity. There are three resources for this: Lesson Slides, A3 carousel resources for printing and a 3-page handout for students including two extracts from Dark Matter in which Michelle Paver uses pathetic fallacy and a guidance page to help students start writing. 3. A sentences lesson which uses Dark Matter to teach students how to identify and use simple, compound and complex sentences - includes lesson slides and a 3-page worksheet of sentences exercises for students to practise. 4. A whole-text analytical essay writing activity to be completed once you have finished reading the novel. This one-page handout introduces the essay to students, gives them question options to choose from and models how to plan the essay. If you have any questions, please ask!
GCSE English Non-Fiction Writing Models
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GCSE English Non-Fiction Writing Models

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Four non-fiction model writing responses that I created to help students prepare for the non-fiction writing section of GCSE English Language. The models are as follows: A persusasive letter from a teacher to the school Principal about changes to the school canteen (398 words - suitable for middle or lower ability groups). A letter to a friend who is coming to stay describing the things they can see and do in the area. This is a hybrid of letter writing and travel writing, combining the skills of writing to describe, explain and inform (945 words - this is a lengthy, high level response suitable for middle or higher ability groups). A travel-writing article about Isafjordur in Iceland (452 words - suitable for a range of groups). A stop-smoking leaflet, aimed at persuading teenagers to quit smoking (381 words - suitable for a range of groups). Any questions, just ask!
A Level Gothic Literature - Guide to writing a comparative thesis
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A Level Gothic Literature - Guide to writing a comparative thesis

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A 3-page guide to writing a comparative thesis paragraph for the A Level Gothic Literature unit. The resource includes: 1. An explanation of what a thesis is. 2. The golden rules of thesis-writing. 3. A model thesis paragraph comparing The Tell-Tale Heart with The Fall of the House of Usher, focusing on the extent to which they are Gothic texts. 4. Two pages of sentence stems for essay-writing - these are useful for all Literature essays, not just Gothic. I used this resource as the basis for a lesson in which students worked in pairs to write their own comparative thesis on a different pair of Gothic texts, using the model and rules for guidance, first getting them to read the model and articulate what made it an effective opening paragraph. Alternatively, if your students have studied these texts, they could write the rest of the essay, using the thesis paragraph as a road map. *Please note, if you have purchased my 'Essay Writing Guide for A Level and GCSE', the sentence stems in this resource are the same as in that.
The Penelopiad - Power, Sexuality and Weaving e-Book for iBooks
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The Penelopiad - Power, Sexuality and Weaving e-Book for iBooks

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A detailed, 22-page e-Book on the background, key themes and characters of Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad focusing on historical context, power, sexuality and weaving. Created to give A-Level students the necessary background on The Odyssey and the roles of Penelope and Odysseus in Homer's text, it looks at themes of power and sexuality in the original text, throughout history and the ways in which Atwood explores, challenges and expands on these. The e-Book is divided into the following sections: - Aristotle's philosophical conceptions of power. - Male power in The Odyssey, focusing on Odysseus, Telemachus and The Suitors, followed by a detailed analysis of how male power is represented in Homer's text, looking in particular at storytelling as a male prerogative. - Female power in The Odyssey, focusing on Penelope, the Maids, Circe and Calypso, and the threat of female power and sexuality. - Context on the Virgin-Whore Dichotomy and the Femme Fatale in 20th Century Culture. This is developed into a discussion on the cultural conception of two Penelopes; the virgin and the whore. - Detailed section on the Maids in both texts and their connection to Artemis and her 12 Moon Maidens. - Does Penelope sleep with the suitors? An exploration of this question in Homer and Atwood's texts. - What other forms does female power take?: A look at inaction and weaving as key forms of female power. - Penelope throughout History - An overview looking at Penelope in Ovid's Heroides, 16th and 17th Century poetry and 21st Century film and theatre. - How far does Atwood reject and rewrite the limiting portrayal of Penelope? - An exploration of what Atwood's Penelopiad achieves. Contains critical quotations from Cixous, Stein and Gregersdottir. Please note, the file will need to be opened and read in iBooks, which can be done on any iPad or iPhone, so works well for student revision on the go.
Nineteenth Century Short Stories Resources
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Nineteenth Century Short Stories Resources

5 Resources
Resources for teaching The New Windmill Nineteenth Century Short Stories collection, including: 1. An in-depth, 30 page revision guide for the New Windmill Book of Nineteenth Century Short Stories on the Edexcel IGCSE English Literature Course. For each story, there is: - An overview, covering key points on characterisation, plot and themes. Links are made between the stories where relevant. - Key quotations - A list of key themes. 2. Country Living SOLO Taxonomy Questions - 14 questions on the short story 'Country Living' by Guy De Maupassant based on SOLO Taxonomy principles. The questions are designed to be done after a first reading of the story to check and develop students' understanding of the plot, context and characters in a phased way. They are divided into sections of 'Unistructural', 'Multistructural', 'Relational' and 'Extended Abstract' going from basic, building-block knowledge of the story to abstract connections to contemporary ideas and writing. Students choose a starting point appropriate to their current skill and knowledge level; equally, they could work in differentiated groups, with each group taking a set of questions to answer. 3. 14 questions on the short story 'Napoleon and the Spectre' by Charlotte Bronte based on SOLO Taxonomy principles, designed similarly to those above for Country Living. 4. Nine comprehension and analysis questions on the short story 'The Nightingale and the Rose' by Oscar Wilde requiring in-depth, critical responses. The questions are designed to be done after a first reading of the story to check and develop students' understanding of the plot, characters and themes. This is a useful classwork or homework resource. 5. Three sets of questions on the short stories 'News of the Engagement', 'The Unexpected' and 'Hop Frog' from the New Windmill collection. The questions are designed to be done after a first reading of the story to check and develop students' understanding of the plot, context and characters. There is a combination of comprehension and analysis questions. This would make an effective classwork, homework or flipped learning task if you asked students to read the story independently before completing the questions.
'Napoleon & the Spectre' SOLO Taxonomy Questions - 19th Century Short Stories
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'Napoleon & the Spectre' SOLO Taxonomy Questions - 19th Century Short Stories

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14 questions on the short story 'Napoleon and the Spectre' by Charlotte Bronte based on SOLO Taxonomy principles. The questions are designed to be done after a first reading of the story to check and develop students' understanding of the plot, context and characters in a phased way. They are divided into sections of 'Unistructural', 'Multistructural', 'Relational' and 'Extended Abstract' going from basic, building-block knowledge of the story to abstract connections to contemporary ideas and writing. Students choose a starting point appropriate to their current skill and knowledge level; equally, they could work in differentiated groups, with each group taking a set of questions to answer. Students might need to conduct some research in order to answer some of the questions. Designed for teaching of the New Windmill 19th Century Short Stories on the Edexcel IGCSE.
'The Nightingale and the Rose' Questions - 19th Century Short Stories
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'The Nightingale and the Rose' Questions - 19th Century Short Stories

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Nine comprehension and analysis questions on the short story 'The Nightingale and the Rose' by Oscar Wilde requiring in-depth, critical responses. The questions are designed to be done after a first reading of the story to check and develop students' understanding of the plot, characters and themes. This is a useful classwork or homework resource. Designed for teaching of the New Windmill 19th Century Short Stories on the Edexcel IGCSE.
'Country Living' Guy De Maupassant SOLO Taxonomy Questions
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'Country Living' Guy De Maupassant SOLO Taxonomy Questions

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14 questions on the short story 'Country Living' by Guy De Maupassant based on SOLO Taxonomy principles. The questions are designed to be done after a first reading of the story to check and develop students' understanding of the plot, context and characters in a phased way. They are divided into sections of 'Unistructural', 'Multistructural', 'Relational' and 'Extended Abstract' going from basic, building-block knowledge of the story to abstract connections to contemporary ideas and writing. Students choose a starting point appropriate to their current skill and knowledge level; equally, they could work in differentiated groups, with each group taking a set of questions to answer. Students might need to conduct some research in order to answer some of the questions. Designed for teaching of the New Windmill 19th Century Short Stories on the Edexcel IGCSE.