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Maths resources. Working on Project-A-Lesson. A full lesson in a PowerPoint. For busy teachers who still want outstanding engaging tasks and learning checks

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Maths resources. Working on Project-A-Lesson. A full lesson in a PowerPoint. For busy teachers who still want outstanding engaging tasks and learning checks
Maths Pointless - V4.1

Maths Pointless - V4.1

Changelog: 2 new sections. Changed some answers to address more misconceptions. Completely redone version of maths pointless. The countdown is now much, much quicker (as requested). New questions will also be coming in an update over the following weeks. Play over numerous rounds and keep score on the board. All credit to Paul Collins.
richardtock
Maths: Endangered Animals - Bar Graphs worksheet

Maths: Endangered Animals - Bar Graphs worksheet

Extremely scaffolded sheet for a low ability class on drawing bar charts. The worksheet starts off with a half-complete bar chart that students must finish from a table of data. Students must then draw a bar chart, given axis and a half-complete tally chart. Finally, they must complete a bar chart from scratch using a half-complete tally chart that they can complete.
richardtock
Rio 2016 Olympics Maths

Rio 2016 Olympics Maths

Massively based on @Dooranran 's stuff. Speed distance time Nets Areas of circles/volumes of spheres Symmetry Pie charts Equations of lines Proportion Reading graphs Misleading graphs.
richardtock
Time Travel - Compound interest

Time Travel - Compound interest

This is a lesson I did about compound interest. It has a clip from the movie Idiocracy on the powerpoint (please comment if this works!). In the movie Luke Wilson discusses a plan to put some money in a bank account, use a time machine, and become a billionaire due to the interest. My question to students was: how many years would you have to go back to earn £1million, assuming a fixed interest rate. As always, please comment if you found this useful or helpful.
richardtock
Shade in the fractions to order them

Shade in the fractions to order them

Pupils shade in visual representations of fractions to order. The shapes have guide lines to create fractions of different denominators next to them, so they can compare them. The sheet then moves on to asking students to order without the pictures. This is designed to follow on from the teachingimage.com visual equivalent fractions worksheets.
richardtock
Sequences - Collect a joke

Sequences - Collect a joke

A worksheet for simple sequences, both generating from a written rule, and finding the missing number. Students start at T. They then answer the question at the bottom of the letter, to find the answer at the top of their next letter. And so on. If they complete this it should spell out the punchline 'Tyrannosaurus Wrecks&'
richardtock
Vary and Twist: Simplifying Ratio

Vary and Twist: Simplifying Ratio

An attempt at some variation theory This one was hard. I spent ages rearranging questions and looking at what should be added. Specifically, I had a massive dilemma when it came to introducing fractions. I was trying to point out the ways in which simplifying fractions and simplifying ratio were similar, but I’m not sure that I haven’t just led students down the wrong path thinking they’re equivalent. For instance 5 : 6 is 5/11 and 6/11, not 5/6. Hmmmm. The variations I used for section A. An example where you can use a prime divisor The opposite way around. What happens to our answer. Order is important! Half one side. 8 : 5 becomes 4 : 5 One that’s already as simple as possible. Time for some questioning? How do you know you can’t simplify it? It’s not just reducing the numbers down. Here you have to multiply up. Deals with what simple is. I have changed this from the picture to make only one number vary from the previous question. Needs a non prime divisor. This isn’t really a variation, though. It has nothing really to do with the previous questions! Again, double one side Double both. Our answer does not double! Adding a third part of the ratio. Changes the answer significantly. Doubling two parts here. Our parts don’t double in our answer! If you amend this and it works better, please let me know.
richardtock
Comparing fractions and percentages

Comparing fractions and percentages

Scaffolded sheet that asks students to shade in 10x10 grids to see which is bigger, a given fraction or percentage. The last question deliberately gives students a fraction which does not fit nicely into a 10x10. This is useful for a discussion/plenary, and provides an opportunity for students to see an advantage of more formal methods. The IW resource introduces students to the idea of colouring in the grids. (This works best if pupils come up to the board and colour in themselves) The worksheet uses the free Quicksand font. Please download this if it does not display correctly.
richardtock
Collecting Like Terms

Collecting Like Terms

ppt on collecting like terms. Includes: Discussion on what a like term is Some basic questions Questions about algebraic perimeter Questions on algebra pyramids A problem solving task involving an algebraic magic square Two learning checks.
richardtock
Vary and Twist: Collecting like terms

Vary and Twist: Collecting like terms

Not sure how I feel about some of the decisions here. I’ve introduced a bit of index laws towards the end of the sheet. Is this madness? I thought I would add it to reinforce the difference between simplifying powers and simplifying regular expressions. Maybe it’s too much. As usual here’s my little justification for the first 10 questions. A simple one to start If you change the letter, it’s the same process You can have multiples of terms And it doesn’t matter where in the expression they occur You can have 3 terms And it doesn’t matter where in the expression they occur Introducing a negative for the first time. At the end to make it easier But the negative can occur anywhere! Here it actually makes you use negatives unless you collect the terms first Introducing terms like bc. It’s not the same as b + c We can do some division Later questions cover stuff like ab being the same as ba. I quite like the last question
richardtock
Vary and Twist: Dividing in a ratio

Vary and Twist: Dividing in a ratio

A worksheet attempting to combine Craig Barton’s ideas on variation theory (only changing one part at a time) and Dani and Hunal’s ideas around making students make choices. I’ve tried to build up to that. Maybe by trying to combine both I miss the point of each. Would love criticisms and thoughts.
richardtock
Vary and Twist : Two Step Equations

Vary and Twist : Two Step Equations

Trying to use variation theory My thinking A question to start Reversing the terms. Does balancing still work? A subtraction. How does this effect our balance. Does reversing the terms still lead us to the same answer Increasing the constant by one. What happens? Also: a decimal answer. We can have a negative answer Divide x, instead of multiplying it. Increasing co-efficient of x by one. What happens to our answer? Doubling co-efficient of x. Not sure about these last two. I think they may be a step back from question 7. This is the problem with presenting these in a linear format. These questions are variations on question 1, not question 7. I might experiment with some kind of spider diagram. Doubling the divisor from 7. Again, maybe the linear way these are written is a bit rubbish. Don’t know how I like the order of these questions, but there’s lots to think about and something to tweak. I have found the transition to asking ‘why have they asked you that question? What are they trying to tell you?’ has been difficult for some students, but I think it’s worth devoting time to it. If students are inspecting questions for things like this, maybe they’re more likely to read the question thoroughly and pick out it’s mathematics. Big hope, I know.
richardtock