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I'm an experienced history teacher, educated at the University of Sussex, who has worked in two 'outstanding' inner city London schools. I am currently head of history at a large school in East London. I am particularly knowledgeable in both AQA spec B and Edexcel Spec B. I try to focus on lessons which are both knowledge and skills based and incorporate a wide variety of teaching and learning strategies; particularly independent learning.

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I'm an experienced history teacher, educated at the University of Sussex, who has worked in two 'outstanding' inner city London schools. I am currently head of history at a large school in East London. I am particularly knowledgeable in both AQA spec B and Edexcel Spec B. I try to focus on lessons which are both knowledge and skills based and incorporate a wide variety of teaching and learning strategies; particularly independent learning.
How did Stalin control the USSR?
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How did Stalin control the USSR?

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This powerpoint introduces students to Stalin and looks at the methods he used to control the USSR. Students will use information provided on key fators such as purges, cult of personality and the secret police to prepare a a project.
Abyssinian and Manchurian Crisis: 10 Mark Prep (AQA Spec B)
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Abyssinian and Manchurian Crisis: 10 Mark Prep (AQA Spec B)

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All images sourced from Google images ‘labelled for reuse’ and licensed under Public Domain NB: You need AQA Spec B textbook to go alongside this lesson. It takes roughly 4-5 lessons to cover all the activities in the powerpoint. This lesson was developed to aid students' understanding of the Manchurian Crisis and the Abyssinian Crisis, as well as developing their 10 mark question skills (AQA Spec B paper one). I had found that many of my students really struggled with the details of both the Manchurian and Abyssinian Crises as such a range of new concepts are introduced. I developed this lesson as a response to that, and they have been achieving much higher grades on these topics since I have been teaching it this way. This lesson also includes a breakdown on answering ten mark questions.
How did Muhammad influence Islam?
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How did Muhammad influence Islam?

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All images sourced from Google images ‘labelled for reuse’ and licensed under Public Domain This lesson encourages students to think about the expansion of Islam, and uses a case study of the Prophet Muhammad's life, in order to help then understand why Islam expanded so quickly. The lesson introduces students to key events in Muhammad's life and encourages them to think of what the key turning point in Islam was.
AQA - 12 Mark Q Improvement Tool (Race Relations)
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AQA - 12 Mark Q Improvement Tool (Race Relations)

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Goes alongside AQA Spec' B Unit Two Textbook: This booklet introduces students to the three main subject areas in the AQA Race Relations unit. It guides students through the subject knowledge and encourages them to evaluate and link factors as they go through. It also includes writing scaffolds and templates for the 12 mark answers and is particularly useful for supporting C/D border students. I have used this with my own students in the last few months and have found this method has increased students' grades significantly on this type of question.
Music & Protest 1960s Britain
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Music & Protest 1960s Britain

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This is a group based lesson that I prepared for an observation, so has vast amounts of differentiation in it. The students look at how young people used music to rebel against Victorian ideologies, their parents and protest against war, racism etc.
Market Place Game - Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, Comecon, Cominform, Dollar Imperialism
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Market Place Game - Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, Comecon, Cominform, Dollar Imperialism

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This lesson is aimed at a GCSE class studying the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, Comecon , Cominform and Dollar imperialism. It is a market place game which will require you to have: sugar paper, and marker pens. I have included the text from the books that I used for this, but you might want to find your own information. It is a really fun lesson that I love teaching and the kids love doing. All of the instructions and resources you need for this lesson are included on the powerpoint. I did it over a double lesson. I taught it recently for an observation and it was graded outstanding because of its emphasis on independent learning. Students begin by analysing an American source showing Stalin choking on the Truman Doctrine. The students look at this through a square of inference. Students are then put into groups, each one looking at either: the Truman Doctrine, The Marshall Plan, Comecon, Cominform or the Soviet response. Groups of no more than 5 are ideal. Students are then asked to read the text on their topic and after that have 20 minutes to answer the questions on their topic that they have been given. They must do this by symbolising their answers using no more than ten words and as many words, numbers, symbols as they want. After the 20 mins is up, one student stays at their table and the others take their A3 worksheet and go shopping in the market place to find the answers to all their questions. One student stays and teaches those that come to their market place. At the end the students go back to their table and 'teach the teacher'. At the end you ask the students to revise their answers for a knowledge test at the beginning of the next lesson.
Industrial Revolution - Did Oliver Twist really Exist?
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Industrial Revolution - Did Oliver Twist really Exist?

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This lesson is designed to take around two lessons. The students begin the lesson by recapping their understanding of the industrial revolution so that they can understand the connections between it and Victorian workhouses. Students then go on to complete a square of inference where they will analyse a contemporary source about workhouse schools. Following on from this a detailed discussion should be held about the way our current government deals with vulnerable people. They will consider similarities and differences between the current government and Victorian governments. Students will question the morality of both systems and consider how/if they feel vulnerable people in society should be supported by the state. Students will then be introduced to Dickens' representation of Oliver Twist through an extract of the 1968 musical. Lesson Two will be an analysis of a variety of contemporary sources which students will analyse in order for them to understand how accurate Dickens' representation of the workhouses was. Finally students will create a human continuum where they will place themselves based on how accurate they find Dickens' representation of the workhouses to be.
Crime & Punishment Edexcel  GCSE  Exam Help Booklet
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Crime & Punishment Edexcel GCSE Exam Help Booklet

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This booklet was designed to support students in their preparation for paper one (Edexcel) on Crime and Punishment. The booklet contains specimen questions that students can practice, which are different from the specimen paper on the Edexcel website. It also contains detailed ideas on how students can successfully answer all of the questions on this paper. There is also a powerpoint slide containing the two sources they need for these specimen questions.
GCSE 16 Q Mark Help Sheet for Edexcel Spec' B
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GCSE 16 Q Mark Help Sheet for Edexcel Spec' B

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This resource was made for lower-ability GCSE students who are struggling to get their heads around the structure and requirements for the 16 mark question on Edexcel Spec B. I have used it recently with my own year tens and saw a big improvement in many of the lower ability students' grades after using the scaffold. It is always useful for all students who are attempting the question for the first time.
How did William use the feudal system to control the English?
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How did William use the feudal system to control the English?

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All images sourced from Google images ‘labelled for reuse’ and licensed under Public Domain. Text attract attributed to 'Heinemann History Scheme 'Life in Medieval Times.' This lesson is an introduction to the feudal system. It allows students to consider 'hierarchy' through a comparison of medieval and modern power structures in the UK. Students will also question the morailty of our current ruling system and will be able to draw parallels between today's poor and medieval peasants. It also encourages students to think about 'divine right of kings' and dictatorship and to question how far that still exists today. It is part of a unit which looks at how William kept control of England for 21 years. Students will consider what the feudal system was and why it was so significant to William in allowing him to control the English. Students are required to use their numeracy skills to turn data into Pi charts. It also has a strong literacy focus as students analyse text in order to allow them to discover more about how the feudal system worked.
How did Norman castles improve security?
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How did Norman castles improve security?

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All images are labelled for reuse from google images. In this lesson students will consider the significance of Norman castles in helping William take control of the English. Students start off by drawing and labelling a sketch of a castle and attempting to design it to it is as effective a defence as possible, They will then consider the reasons why castles were so important to William and will consider the advantages and disadvantages of Motte &and Bailey castles. Students will go on to play a game where they will identify some images of Windsor Castle and consider why it's significant. Finally they are asked to place themselves onto a significance thermometer where they will be asked to justify their opinions.
Entire unit of work on the Norman Conquest - How did William the Conqueror control the English?
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Entire unit of work on the Norman Conquest - How did William the Conqueror control the English?

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All images labelled for reuse from google images. This is a five lesson KS3 unit looking at how William the Conqueror kept control of the English for 21 years including the scheme of work. Students will complete a number of engaging activities including acting as William's advisor, engaging in change and continuity continuum's, designing their own Domesday surveys and more. This unit of work focusses mainly on knowledge and understanding and explanation and analysis. It addresses many of the key skills such as inferring from sources and interpretations, evaluating significance and explaining change and continuity. All of the lessons have differentiated activities for lower and higher ability ability students. It also includes a number of writing scaffolds to help all students, particularly lower ability students work on extended writing.
Entire Scheme of Work on the Rwandan Genocide - Lessons and SOW included
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Entire Scheme of Work on the Rwandan Genocide - Lessons and SOW included

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This is a mini four lesson scheme of work the Rwandan Genocide. The first powerpoint containing lessons 1-2 focusses particularly on the UN eight stages of genocide and the impact of propaganda through an analysis of Radio Télévision Libre des Mille Collines, Kangura and the Hutu Ten Commandments. Lesson 3-4 considers the significance of the genocide by asking students to consider why the Rwandan Genocide was so personal. Students will look at news footage from 1994 and read a variety of survivor stories of both Tutsis and moderate Hutus.
Entire Scheme of Work on the Industrial Revolution - Lessons and SOW included
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Entire Scheme of Work on the Industrial Revolution - Lessons and SOW included

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This is an entire scheme of work on the Industrial Revolution including the scheme of work word document. The enquiry for the SOW is 'How did the poor make Britain rich?' Students are taken through a variety of lessons entitled: 'who were the white slaves?, 'Did Oliver Twist really exist?' and 'What was black gold?'. Throughout these lessons students will look at contemporary sources and interpretations to allow them to reach an conclusion to the enquiry question. Students will consider, discuss and debate a range of moral issues as they go through this unit. Students undertake a wide range of independent learning strategies throughout this unit.
Who were the White Slaves? (Industrial Revolution Lesson on Child Labourers in factories)
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Who were the White Slaves? (Industrial Revolution Lesson on Child Labourers in factories)

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Students will begin this lesson by creating a human timeline of the industrial revolution in order to allow them to understand the historical context of the era. Students will discuss the idea that the use of child labour and the Transatlantic slave trade were key contributing factors in the success of the industrial revolution. Finally they will go on to analyse and evaluate two contemporary sources and will consider the reliability and uses of these sources. By the end of the lesson students should be able to begin the explain how the poor made Britain rich. Keywords: Parish Pauper, Transatlantic slave trade, Parish Apprentice, Child Labourer, Industrial Revolution/
US President Overview - Truman to Reagan
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US President Overview - Truman to Reagan

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I created this president overview to support my GCSE students in their Edexcel units on the Cold War, Civil Rights and the Vietnam War. The overview shows the key policies each president passed in relation to those events. The students have found it very helpful in their revision.
Can you solve William the Conqueror's problems?
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Can you solve William the Conqueror's problems?

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This resources provides students with a secret mission. They have been appointed as William the Conqueror's head advisor and they must work out the best ways to help him gain total power over England. This is an independent learning task. They are provided with everything they need to succeed without too much teacher support. This lesson is excellent for getting pupils to understand what problems William faced when he first invaded England and the decisions he made to overcome them. Pages 11-20 are the work booklet that must be printed off and given to students.