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Ruth Messenger's Shop

I've been teaching history for four years, and I aim to provide lessons that are ready to go with minimal tweaking just to personalise the resource to your class and their prior learning. I'm a big fan of paired discussion, group work, debates, living graphs and hot seating, and I provide a variety of tasks in each lesson to ensure learning happens at a pace and that all learning styles are catered for. All feedback gratefully received.

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I've been teaching history for four years, and I aim to provide lessons that are ready to go with minimal tweaking just to personalise the resource to your class and their prior learning. I'm a big fan of paired discussion, group work, debates, living graphs and hot seating, and I provide a variety of tasks in each lesson to ensure learning happens at a pace and that all learning styles are catered for. All feedback gratefully received.
Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot - Innocent or Guilty?
ruthmessenger

Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot - Innocent or Guilty?

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This is my absolute favourite lesson to teach to year 8 - I hope you enjoy it! It is quite a long one though, so either keep the pace up, use fewer sources, or break it into two lessons. Lesson objectives: LO: To know the story of the Gunpowder plot LO: To use evidence to find out more about the Gunpowder Plot LO: To use evidence to question whether the story as we know it is true. LO: To decide whether Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty and use the evidence to prove it This lesson works best if you have students working in groups of 4, but I have done this in pairs and it works fine as well. You will need a focus on good group work, praise for groups that are working well together and rewards for groups who are really discussing and getting into the evidence. One year, I did have to set this lesson as cover so I have also included that as a resource in case you need a quick cover, or need work for a student in inclusion. Enjoy! Ruth
The Battle of Stamford Bridge
ruthmessenger

The Battle of Stamford Bridge

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This lesson follows from my 'xfactor contenders' lesson, but so long as students have been introduced already to William, Harold and Harald, they will have easy access to this lesson. Target Skill - Cause and Continuity Learning Objectives: ALL: will be able to describe who the armies fought for at Stamford Bridge and begin to say who should win MOST: Will be able to make predictions based on evidence SOME: Will be able to use connectives to explain how one advantage or disadvantage would lead to the victor winning. This lesson features a brief teacher talk (with numeracy element), then a sorting task and a writing task with self-assessment.
The Windrush and migration to the UK after the Second World War - Black History Month
ruthmessenger

The Windrush and migration to the UK after the Second World War - Black History Month

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All necessary resources included, this lesson includes a music based starter, questions on a British Pathe clip, a cart sort exercise, a structured literary task and a guided research homework task that asks them to assess the prediction they made in the plenary. The big question that students can answer following this lesson is 'Why did people migrate to Britain after the Second World War?' The lesson covers both push and pull factors and examines why Britain wanted immigrants to come in the first place. Lesson Objectives: ALL: Will be able to identify reasons why Britain wanted immigrants and why people in the West Indies wanted to emigrate MOST: Will be able to describe the push and pull factors and come to a conclusion as to why people migrated in the 1950’s SOME: Will be able to bring their ideas together to explain why so many people migrated in the 1950’s and predict what effect this might have on communities in the UK Suitable for all KS3, HA KS2 or LA KS4 All activities are differentiated and resourced, this lesson can be a standalone lesson or part of a series of lessons on either migration, race or post war recontstruction.
What did Protestants Protest about? The origins of the Protestant Church
ruthmessenger

What did Protestants Protest about? The origins of the Protestant Church

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This lesson is an introduction to the basic issues that Martin Luther had with the Catholic church. It touches on the central role of the priest, indulgences and the financial profligacy of the church. There is one task that uses a page from the SHP Year 7 textbook, but most textbooks will have a page to help answer the question 'what were the main differences between Protestants and Catholics?' This is the question that students use the page to answer, so if you have a similar resource then this lesson is still good for you. Here are the lesson objectives this lesson is designed to satisfy: ALL: Will be able to identify differences between the Catholic and Protestant Churches MOST: Will be able to explain the differences based on what the Protestants protested about SOME: Will be able to make supported inferences about why some people were unhappy with the Catholic church
Intro to the Ideologies of the Cold War: Communism and Capitalism
ruthmessenger

Intro to the Ideologies of the Cold War: Communism and Capitalism

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Designed for KS3, the HA resources are appropriate for KS4, with an additional research task this could be adapted for KS5. This lesson considers the ideologies separate from their historical contexts so it is a great introduction, but also provides space for debate that would be appropriate to a politics or citizenship lesson. Tasks: a vocab based starter, a main that encourages group work with speaking and listening the main method of learning, a class vote as to which ideology is best and a plenary that sneakily uses group work to consolidate learning. Learning Outcomes for this lesson: To be able to identify differences between ideologies To describe one ideology and give a way in which the other ideology is different To explain the differences between the ideologies and why they appeal to people To analyse the pros and cons of the ideologies to understand how they would work in practice Please note this is a self contained lesson with all necessary materials included (unless you want to adapt for KS5), no textbooks needed and no potentially problematic youtube clips to play. Whether you love it or you hate it, please review below so I can keep adjusting these resources to suit! Many thanks, Ruth
The Life of the Medieval Peasant/Villein
ruthmessenger

The Life of the Medieval Peasant/Villein

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This lesson has a large visual element as pictures are used to illustrate peasant tasks. There is a moving around the room to find out information element and a structured literacy tasks with literacy challenges such as 'include three adjectives in this answer'. Resources fully differentiated, just print and go. ALL: Will be able to describe aspects of a peasant’s life MOST: Will be confident using keywords in their explanations SOME: Will write a detailed account using keywords and grammar challenges to describe the life of a peasant
Life in the Hitler Youth Game
ruthmessenger

Life in the Hitler Youth Game

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This game gives students the chance to be a boy in the Hitler youth following the Nazi policies. Board spaces are either events such as reading aloud from Mein Kampf, or questions from the sheet provided to test students knowledge, allowing them either to move forwards or remain. Great consolidation game for KS3 and KS4, especially when revision pressure starts! Thanks to Paul Durnall who gave me this.
Role Play and Creative Writing on the Black Death/ Plague
ruthmessenger

Role Play and Creative Writing on the Black Death/ Plague

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Too often do year 7 arrive in my classroom having learned the basics of the 1664 plague at primary school and so thinking they already know about the 1348 plague as the symptoms were the same. This creative writing task and role play revitalises what can for some students be a surprisingly well trodden topic. NB: Primary school teachers - this task is equally appropriate for KS2 when covering the 1664 plague, although I imagine you will want to add more structure to the writing task. Melton Task: Students will write a short story detailing the events in the fictional village of Melton when the Plague arrives. The story will be in three distinct stages that are already prestructured for students: What happens when the Black Death reaches Melton, how the villagers respond and what happens to the survivors. Melton Background - this is the beginning of the story, or the prelude. You can get students to read this, read it too them or do a 'knock and read' to keep students following along. (This is where you begin to read and circle the room, knock on the table of a student you want to read next, then keep walking and knocking so as many as possible get to read. the uncertainty of knowing who is next makes all students keep up with the reading in front of them.) Melton Role Play - the second part of the play asks students to detail a discussion the villagers might have had in the village church when they knew what they were up against. This task allows students to role play in groups, you will want to prompt them to be finding solutions - what 'cures' were on offer? What did people believe caused the Black Death? Finally students will write up their story, most likely they will do this for homework. There is great potential for you to use your own success criteria to generate a relatively painless level for this work. Thanks to Paul Durnall who gave me these.
Children in Factories during the Industrial Revolution
ruthmessenger

Children in Factories during the Industrial Revolution

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Straightforward lesson on factory conditions with the following tasks: A picture source starter, a 6 minute clip with accompanying questions, then a source analysis of a grisly factory death. Its totally gross, but year 8 love this disgusting source, particularly the bloodthirsty ones! Learning Objectives: ALL students will be able to describe how factories were dangerous for children MOST students will be able to explain why factory owners employed children and how the children ended up there. SOME students will be able to analyse the caption of a source to assess reliability.
The Lives of Peasant Women in Medieval Times/The Middle Ages
ruthmessenger

The Lives of Peasant Women in Medieval Times/The Middle Ages

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This lesson should follow a previous lesson on peasants as this lesson highlights the differences in gender roles. Learning Objectives: ALL: Will be able to describe the traditional roles of men and women in medieval times MOST: Will be able to do so in detail SOME: Will make inferences from a source that they will include in their detailed description. This lesson is highly visual with pictures and a matching task for LA students. There is an element of numeracy in interpreting two graphs on the causes of death of each gender, and a literacy based task in which students write a diary entry of a peasant. I usually allow them to pick their gender, but it would be equally more valuable to make them all be women. I've put on two PowerPoints as I taught this to two classes of differing abilities. There are no monumental differences. If you like this lesson, have a look at my other Medieval Resources in my shop - I have a big chunk of resources that could form a large part of your scheme of work.
XFactor Game for contenders to the English throne in 1066
ruthmessenger

XFactor Game for contenders to the English throne in 1066

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This resource really got my year 7 classes engaged and involved with the 'who should be king?' conundrum because they really liked taking on the personas of the judges from the X factor. The PowerPoint is a pretty straightforward mini play that students read out to the class in the persona you have allocated to them. It worked really well as a whole class activity, but it could also work in groups. As they go, students fill out their voting sheet, giving points out of ten for how well each contestant performs in each question. Your role as teacher is simply to ham it up, express suspicions about William's intentions, play the devil's advocate with students as they chose their King. Finally, the class vote and a King is chosen. This lesson works best if students haven't yet found out who wins the battle of Hastings, it tends to put them firmly on Harold Godwinson's side!
Toussaint L'Ouverture, Slave Rebellion and Haitan Independence
ruthmessenger

Toussaint L'Ouverture, Slave Rebellion and Haitan Independence

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This resource provides a one lesson overview of the slave revolt on St Dominique (later Haiti) and asks students to make a judgement as to how far it was the actions of Toussaint L'Ouverture that gave Haiti its independence, and how far it was events in and ideas coming from France. Tasks include: source based starter living graph identifying information to make an argument with speaking to persuade in pairs writing a structured paragraph that has been differentiated for learners between L3-L6 and may easily be adapted for SEN, or be part of an extended essay for the most able to achieve L7. If you download this, please review! I'd love so WWW/EBI so I know what works well.
How did Roosevelt's Presidential Style differ from his predecessors?
ruthmessenger

How did Roosevelt's Presidential Style differ from his predecessors?

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Students analyse change using continuum bars. will also need previous learning on previous Presidents (Wilson onwards) and a textbook to refer to on Roosevelt's presidency. The 'Edexcel Paper 1: Searching for rights and freedoms in the 20th century' is what I use. Tasks include: chronological placing of Presidents recall of previous facts learned about that President an examination of FDR from the textbook completing the worksheet on the continuum of change
1066 and beyond: Medieval England and William's Conquest
ruthmessenger

1066 and beyond: Medieval England and William's Conquest

8 Resources
Seven exciting lessons to kick start the new term with your new year seven class. These lessons do not require any textbook, nor do they contain youtube links that will soon be obsolete, instead they are activity and role play based and allow students to explore the middle ages using drama, discussion, peer to peer learning and structured literacy tasks. All resources fully differentiated, enjoy!
Doom Paintings and the Church in the Middle Ages
ruthmessenger

Doom Paintings and the Church in the Middle Ages

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This is a pretty relaxed lesson that guides students towards the following objectives: ALL: Will be able to describe doom paintings and their message MOST: Will be able to make inferences from primary sources SOME: Will be able to analyse sources to make an inference as to how powerful the church was in the middle ages. This lesson features a 'see it, describe it, draw it' starter, some paired discussion and a written task to demonstrate understanding. NB. there is no text or clip detailing what a doom painting is, or where they were found. This lesson relies on you having subject knowledge to support students in their inferences.
Assorted Resources for the Atomic Bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki
ruthmessenger

Assorted Resources for the Atomic Bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki

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Here are a bundle of worksheets, three of them are self guided and contain both sources or points of information and a task for students to do. Perfect for a homework or a cover lesson, or as part of a larger lesson plan. The topics on these sheets are: * the long term effects of the bomb * the short term effects of the bomb * reasons for dropping the bomb There is also another worksheet that will require them to have done the first three in order to complete, it is 'why did the USA drop the bomb and what were the consequences of it' and consolidates their learning. Finally I have included both an assessment and an assessment mark scheme that uses the old NC levels. Many thanks to Paul Durnall who gave me this.
Je Suis Le Roi - the Harrying of the North and how William gained full control of England
ruthmessenger

Je Suis Le Roi - the Harrying of the North and how William gained full control of England

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This resource is essentially just a link to an external website. I have uploaded it because it forms the fourth lesson of my scheme of work, but is not my creation so of course it needs to be a free upload. My Hastings lesson is also free if you want to try out a more substantial resource of mine and if you like this style of teaching, please have a look at the full scheme of work in my shop. All I will say about this is you will read it through and be daunted, no doubt your year 7 class are new to you and new to the school, and possibly just a little crazy. But take a risk and give it a go! The more you make this a pantomime, the more fun it is and the more memorable it is for students.
Edexcel Paper 1: Option F LESSON 9 Boom and Bust
ruthmessenger

Edexcel Paper 1: Option F LESSON 9 Boom and Bust

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If you are using this bundle and are looking for Lesson 8, it is the lesson entitled 'Red Scare'. Apologies this is not more clearly labelled. I'm uploading this lesson for free because the bulk of the lesson I taught on it was me drawing a flow diagram of the wall street crash and students making their own diagrams. There is a good clip though with a summary attached. ALL will understand that the Wall Street Crash resulted from the boom years of the 1920s, will also be able to describe the effects of the WSC MOST Will understand the relationship between the boom and the bust and explain the effects of the WSC SOME Will be able to analyse aspects of both the boom and bust to identify where ideas of isolationism and laissez-faire had contributed to the crisis.