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Ruth Messenger's Shop

Average Rating3.47
(based on 18 reviews)

I've been teaching history for four years, and I aim to provide lessons that are ready to go with minimal tweaking just to personalise the resource to your class and their prior learning. I'm a big fan of paired discussion, group work, debates, living graphs and hot seating, and I provide a variety of tasks in each lesson to ensure learning happens at a pace and that all learning styles are catered for. All feedback gratefully received.

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I've been teaching history for four years, and I aim to provide lessons that are ready to go with minimal tweaking just to personalise the resource to your class and their prior learning. I'm a big fan of paired discussion, group work, debates, living graphs and hot seating, and I provide a variety of tasks in each lesson to ensure learning happens at a pace and that all learning styles are catered for. All feedback gratefully received.
The Windrush and migration to the UK after the Second World War - Black History Month
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The Windrush and migration to the UK after the Second World War - Black History Month

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All necessary resources included, this lesson includes a music based starter, questions on a British Pathe clip, a cart sort exercise, a structured literary task and a guided research homework task that asks them to assess the prediction they made in the plenary. The big question that students can answer following this lesson is 'Why did people migrate to Britain after the Second World War?' The lesson covers both push and pull factors and examines why Britain wanted immigrants to come in the first place. Lesson Objectives: ALL: Will be able to identify reasons why Britain wanted immigrants and why people in the West Indies wanted to emigrate MOST: Will be able to describe the push and pull factors and come to a conclusion as to why people migrated in the 1950’s SOME: Will be able to bring their ideas together to explain why so many people migrated in the 1950’s and predict what effect this might have on communities in the UK Suitable for all KS3, HA KS2 or LA KS4 All activities are differentiated and resourced, this lesson can be a standalone lesson or part of a series of lessons on either migration, race or post war recontstruction.
Toussaint L'Ouverture, Slave Rebellion and Haitan Independence
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Toussaint L'Ouverture, Slave Rebellion and Haitan Independence

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This resource provides a one lesson overview of the slave revolt on St Dominique (later Haiti) and asks students to make a judgement as to how far it was the actions of Toussaint L'Ouverture that gave Haiti its independence, and how far it was events in and ideas coming from France. Tasks include: source based starter living graph identifying information to make an argument with speaking to persuade in pairs writing a structured paragraph that has been differentiated for learners between L3-L6 and may easily be adapted for SEN, or be part of an extended essay for the most able to achieve L7. If you download this, please review! I'd love so WWW/EBI so I know what works well.
Mansa Musa and Medieval Mali
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Mansa Musa and Medieval Mali

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This PowerPoint includes all of the resources to run either a single, or a double lesson on Mansa Musa. It is aimed at Year 7 and provides support for students working between L3 and L6 on the old NC Levels. Lesson objectives: L3 - To identify facts about Medieval Mali and Mansa Musa L4 - To describe Medieval Mali and Mansa Musa L5 - To make inferences from sources about Medieval Mali and Mansa Musa L6 - To explain what Medieval Mali and Mansa Musa would seem like to a time traveller, drawing inferences from sources to support their points. Activities include: * A task where students work in pairs, one looks at an image and describes it to his/her partner. The partner draws the image. * Fact generation, teacher models how to get facts from the source, students compete. * Using written sources to gather information * Creating a Time Traveller's Guide to Medieval Mali
How to Make a Revision Plan
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How to Make a Revision Plan

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This PowerPoint guides students through how to make an effective revision plan. It is aimed at students aged 16-18 and encourages them to make a long term, practical and realistic plan. Here is one slide: Mark on the calendar the days you will NOT be working. Eg family events, birthdays, rugby matches, hairdressing appointments. Split the remaining days into 3 parts – morning, afternoon and night. Work only 2 of these parts. So crack on in the morning, take the afternoon off to paint your toenails/ go for a run/ whatever it is you do, and do more in the evening. Use your list of chucks to plan which topic you will do on which day. If you like a bit of variety, you can do two chunks from different subjects on one day. Write on the calendar the subject areas/ chunks/ topics/ chapters you will get done. Make sure you have leisure / kickback time. TRUST YOUR PLAN and change it if you really need to
Intro to the Ideologies of the Cold War: Communism and Capitalism
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Intro to the Ideologies of the Cold War: Communism and Capitalism

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Designed for KS3, the HA resources are appropriate for KS4, with an additional research task this could be adapted for KS5. This lesson considers the ideologies separate from their historical contexts so it is a great introduction, but also provides space for debate that would be appropriate to a politics or citizenship lesson. Tasks: a vocab based starter, a main that encourages group work with speaking and listening the main method of learning, a class vote as to which ideology is best and a plenary that sneakily uses group work to consolidate learning. Learning Outcomes for this lesson: To be able to identify differences between ideologies To describe one ideology and give a way in which the other ideology is different To explain the differences between the ideologies and why they appeal to people To analyse the pros and cons of the ideologies to understand how they would work in practice Please note this is a self contained lesson with all necessary materials included (unless you want to adapt for KS5), no textbooks needed and no potentially problematic youtube clips to play. Whether you love it or you hate it, please review below so I can keep adjusting these resources to suit! Many thanks, Ruth
Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot - Innocent or Guilty?
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Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot - Innocent or Guilty?

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This is my absolute favourite lesson to teach to year 8 - I hope you enjoy it! It is quite a long one though, so either keep the pace up, use fewer sources, or break it into two lessons. Lesson objectives: LO: To know the story of the Gunpowder plot LO: To use evidence to find out more about the Gunpowder Plot LO: To use evidence to question whether the story as we know it is true. LO: To decide whether Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty and use the evidence to prove it This lesson works best if you have students working in groups of 4, but I have done this in pairs and it works fine as well. You will need a focus on good group work, praise for groups that are working well together and rewards for groups who are really discussing and getting into the evidence. One year, I did have to set this lesson as cover so I have also included that as a resource in case you need a quick cover, or need work for a student in inclusion. Enjoy! Ruth
Children in Factories during the Industrial Revolution
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Children in Factories during the Industrial Revolution

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Straightforward lesson on factory conditions with the following tasks: A picture source starter, a 6 minute clip with accompanying questions, then a source analysis of a grisly factory death. Its totally gross, but year 8 love this disgusting source, particularly the bloodthirsty ones! Learning Objectives: ALL students will be able to describe how factories were dangerous for children MOST students will be able to explain why factory owners employed children and how the children ended up there. SOME students will be able to analyse the caption of a source to assess reliability.
What did Protestants Protest about? The origins of the Protestant Church
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What did Protestants Protest about? The origins of the Protestant Church

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This lesson is an introduction to the basic issues that Martin Luther had with the Catholic church. It touches on the central role of the priest, indulgences and the financial profligacy of the church. There is one task that uses a page from the SHP Year 7 textbook, but most textbooks will have a page to help answer the question 'what were the main differences between Protestants and Catholics?' This is the question that students use the page to answer, so if you have a similar resource then this lesson is still good for you. Here are the lesson objectives this lesson is designed to satisfy: ALL: Will be able to identify differences between the Catholic and Protestant Churches MOST: Will be able to explain the differences based on what the Protestants protested about SOME: Will be able to make supported inferences about why some people were unhappy with the Catholic church
The Life of the Medieval Peasant/Villein
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The Life of the Medieval Peasant/Villein

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This lesson has a large visual element as pictures are used to illustrate peasant tasks. There is a moving around the room to find out information element and a structured literacy tasks with literacy challenges such as 'include three adjectives in this answer'. Resources fully differentiated, just print and go. ALL: Will be able to describe aspects of a peasant’s life MOST: Will be confident using keywords in their explanations SOME: Will write a detailed account using keywords and grammar challenges to describe the life of a peasant
Dunkirk: Victory or Defeat? Newspaper Task with supporting resources
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Dunkirk: Victory or Defeat? Newspaper Task with supporting resources

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The main bulk of this is the newspaper task, designed to meet the following LOs * ALL: Will be able to describe aspects of what happened at Dunkirk * MOST: Will be able to support an opinion as to whether Dunkirk was a defeat or a victory * SOME: Will be able to use the origin of the source to comment on whether the source is reliable. * ONE or TWO... Might be able to use their analysis of source reliability to explain why they trust some sources over others and how this has affected their own overall judgement. There is a presentation about Dunkirk with pictures and statistics, you may choose to deliver this yourself, or stick it up around the room for students to find and examine themselves. They may then read the interpretations/opinions sheet in which various sources give their verdict on Dunkirk, and the Dunkirk survivors sheet which does the same. Finally I have included an electronic template for the newspaper front page that the students will write, this could be set for homework over a VLE, or printed and handed out for students to fill in. If they are making handwritten copies, I would recommend having a stash of plain paper ready as most students prefer to establish the layout themselves. Thanks to Paul Durnall who gave me parts of this.
Why did Capital Punishment End? Crime and Punishment in the Twentieth Century
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Why did Capital Punishment End? Crime and Punishment in the Twentieth Century

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Intended for GCSE students either studying the OCR or Edxecel spec for Crime and Punishment, appropriate for both the new GCSE and the old, this stand alone lesson is designed to be used with a textbook. The SHP, OCR and Edexcel textbooks will all be fine for this lesson. Lesson Objectives: ALL Will be able to describe some of the reasons capital punishment ended MOST Will be able to support their points with detailed evidence SOME explain how these factors led to capital punishment ending This lesson includes a clip about Derek Bentley, a table to be completed using the textbook, a triangle of importance and then an essay question that asks students to compare factors.
Nanny and Sam Sharpe - Freedom fighters and Slave Rebellions in Jamaica
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Nanny and Sam Sharpe - Freedom fighters and Slave Rebellions in Jamaica

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This highly versatile resource can be used as part of a scheme of work (following on from my Toussaint L'Ouverture resource) or as a stand alone lesson. It is aimed at KS3 but contains sufficient challenge for KS4 and can be adapted down for LA KS3 (students aged 11-16). It has been designed to enable students to meet these objectives: LO: To be able to describe the actions of these freedom fighters LO: To make a comparison of their strengths and weaknesses LO: To evaluate their significance in ending slavery in Jamaica There are a range of activities contained, these include: - a very brief overview of Jamaican history up to colonisation - individual reading task that can be adapted to move students around the room - paired peer to peer teaching task - a worksheet that encourages additional detail to be used in answers (old NC level 5) - opportunity for students to set their own criteria to assess significance - opportunity for debate - ideas for homework task and plenary This lesson is ready to go once downloaded for the majority of learners, just minor tweaks needed if you want to differentiate down, or refer back to the prior learning of your class. Teacher notes included with slides. Feedback gratefully received, Ruth
How much did the Black Death of 1348 change life for Peasants in Medieval England?
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How much did the Black Death of 1348 change life for Peasants in Medieval England?

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This is a lesson for HA year 7 students. It gives them the opportunity to write an essay aiming to hit the old NC levels 5,6 and even 7. I have had a 7A essay handed in using this lesson and most were L6 so if you want to challenge your HA, give this a go. Be aware though that this resource covers three lessons and is mostly concerned with essay structure. I haven't indicated in the PP at which point the students write the essay, so here is how I did it: Lesson 1: students use a card sort to examine the consequences of the black death, they work in pairs and groups to find the most significant/substantial change and the least significant/substantial change. They then choose three pieces of evidence that show significant change, three that show medium change and three that show no change. These will make up their paragraphs. Lesson 2: Students look at a dummy essay on how much school rules changed life for students. I have labelled a paragraph with structural necessities such as 'point, evidence, explanation' and they use highlighters to spot where the author of the essay has done this. Students get started on the essay, aim to finish one paragraph in class, then set one for homework. Lesson 3: You can allow students to peer assess each other's essay so far (in the same way they highlighted the dummy essay), or you can just give them half an hour to finish the essay. They need to have completed their third paragraph before you show them how to write the conclusion. There is a conclusion to the dummy essay that students analyse the structure of before having a go themselves. Most likely, you will want to set this for homework as if your HA class are like mine, they are crazy perfectionists. Please note, this lesson is not differentiated. You would have to approach this essay in a completely different way for a class that is targetted L3-5 and a L4 student would need support to access it. But if you want to push your HA, this resource is really strong. Learning Objectives: ALL students will be able to Describe some of the ways in which life changed using some detailed evidence. Write a conclusion to say how much life changed. (L5) MOST students will be able to Explain how the black death changed the lives of peasants by thinking about the short term and the long term effects of the changes. Supporting all comments with detailed factual knowledge (L6) SOME students will be able to use a lot of detailed factual knowledge to analyse how much change has taken place. This means that you really pick the facts apart to show how much life changed. (L7)
Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad
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Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad

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This resource is designed for a KS3 class and covers the following lesson objectives: LO: To find out information from primary sources LO: To describe the underground rail road using detail LO: To make inferences from combining sources LO: To explain significance using PEE It may be used as a standalone resource, or in combination with other resources on freedom fighters such as Toussaint L'Ouverture, Nanny of the Maroons, Sam Sharpe or Bussa. It contains a variety of tasks such as source analysis, and links to literacy objectives of using metaphors, clarifying the meaning of words using a partner, and refining a PEE paragraph. US teachers - this resources is designed for UK students who have little existing knowledge of the underground railroad and haven't heard of Harriet Tubman. As such, it provides an overview rather than an in depth examination of Tubman which you might want to go to if your classes have a higher level of pre-existing knowledge. NB I have made a map for students on which I have roughly drawn borders and rivers freehand. In case this isn't precise enough, I included a hyperlink to an online map with more precise borders - I didn't use this in the first instance because my whiteboard isn't too great and I don't think many students will be able to see the borders. All feedback gratefully received! Ruth
Segregation in the Southern States of the USA
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Segregation in the Southern States of the USA

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A complete lesson - ready to go if you’re in a hurry, or full of tasks to pick and choose from if you have time to personalise this for your class. All resources included on the Power Point to make it easy to access and print the necessary parts. Aims to cover these objectives: * To understand how segregation came about * To give detailed descriptions of segregation * To explain the attitudes towards race that made segregation so pervasive * To predict the challenges faced by civil rights campaigners Includes a variety of tasks, classroom discussion with additional information for the teacher to support questioning, group work task with opportunity for students to move and a 7 minute clip of a primary source for students to evaluate. Includes ideas for differentiation for each task and so is suitable as a stand alone resource for KS 3 and KS 4, a great intro to the topic for KS 5 but would need to be accompanied by a textbook on the topic to support the research task. Originally designed to support teaching of Edexcel AS Level D5 Civil Rights module.
Life in the Hitler Youth Game
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Life in the Hitler Youth Game

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This game gives students the chance to be a boy in the Hitler youth following the Nazi policies. Board spaces are either events such as reading aloud from Mein Kampf, or questions from the sheet provided to test students knowledge, allowing them either to move forwards or remain. Great consolidation game for KS3 and KS4, especially when revision pressure starts! Thanks to Paul Durnall who gave me this.
The Battle of Hastings - re-enactment and news report
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The Battle of Hastings - re-enactment and news report

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This is an active lesson which borrows heavily from thinkinghistory.com and their re-enactment instructions http://thinkinghistory.co.uk/ActivityBase/BattleofHastings.html I have provided the resources I use before and after the re-enactment; weighing up the advantages of each side, a quick paragraph on who is most likely to win, the re-enactment itself and then the news report with NC level success criteria. Lovely lovely lesson, works well as part of my Hastings Scheme of Work that you can find in my shop.
Edexcel Paper 1: Option F LESSON 9 Boom and Bust
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Edexcel Paper 1: Option F LESSON 9 Boom and Bust

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If you are using this bundle and are looking for Lesson 8, it is the lesson entitled 'Red Scare'. Apologies this is not more clearly labelled. I'm uploading this lesson for free because the bulk of the lesson I taught on it was me drawing a flow diagram of the wall street crash and students making their own diagrams. There is a good clip though with a summary attached. ALL will understand that the Wall Street Crash resulted from the boom years of the 1920s, will also be able to describe the effects of the WSC MOST Will understand the relationship between the boom and the bust and explain the effects of the WSC SOME Will be able to analyse aspects of both the boom and bust to identify where ideas of isolationism and laissez-faire had contributed to the crisis.
Je Suis Le Roi - the Harrying of the North and how William gained full control of England
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Je Suis Le Roi - the Harrying of the North and how William gained full control of England

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This resource is essentially just a link to an external website. I have uploaded it because it forms the fourth lesson of my scheme of work, but is not my creation so of course it needs to be a free upload. My Hastings lesson is also free if you want to try out a more substantial resource of mine and if you like this style of teaching, please have a look at the full scheme of work in my shop. All I will say about this is you will read it through and be daunted, no doubt your year 7 class are new to you and new to the school, and possibly just a little crazy. But take a risk and give it a go! The more you make this a pantomime, the more fun it is and the more memorable it is for students.