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The Slightly Awesome Teacher's Shop

All my resources are aimed at teaching students to the top, that's the USP! You can find them on the UK's second largest English teaching channel, Mr Salles Teaches English, and also see how I deliver them there. If you want to be an even better teacher, try The Slightly Awesome Techer, https://amzn.to/2GtQu6l

All my resources are aimed at teaching students to the top, that's the USP! You can find them on the UK's second largest English teaching channel, Mr Salles Teaches English, and also see how I deliver them there. If you want to be an even better teacher, try The Slightly Awesome Techer, https://amzn.to/2GtQu6l
Grade 9 Extract Essay on Jekyll and Hyde
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Grade 9 Extract Essay on Jekyll and Hyde

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Learn the 12 techniques my students used in getting grades 8 and 9 in the 2017 exams. Use these to show students what to do, rather than refer to wordy and ambiguous mark schemes. Use a PPT with highlighted paragraphs of the full essay, all coded with the 12 techniques. See which 3 skills are demanded of the best conclusion. Also included is the whole essay in Word.
Gerald Croft: Complete Grade 9 Analysis
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Gerald Croft: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

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This is a really in depth analysis of Gerald, and you will see him differently after you have read it. Your students will have a completely new perspective. Here is an extract to show you what I mean: Gerald’s Affair with Daisy Renton Although Sheila is the first to expose Gerald’s affair at the start, the language they both use strongly hints that she will forgive him after breaking off the engagement and that, after the end of the play, they will marry. Gerald’s first impulse is to lie, because Priestley wants to present all capitalists as hypocrites. He denies knowing any “Eva Smith”. Sheila points out that she knows he is simply using his intelligence to maintain a veneer of honesty, as he knew her as “Daisy Renton”. This is called sophistry – using clever arguments which appear true but which the speaker knows to be false. Although Sheila insists on the truth, her language is also a kind of sophistry. She uses euphemism. Instead of asking for how long he had sex with Daisy, she only insists he “knew her very well”. This is important, as while she is at her most angry now, her own language minimises what he has done. This will make it much easier for her to forgive him in the future. Clever as he is, Gerald picks up on this weakness in her resolve, calling her “darling” in order to manipulate her. He immediately asks her to keep the affair secret from The Inspector. This might seem astonishingly arrogant. However, Priestley is again showing the corruption of the patriarchy. He expects a woman to protect him even at the expense of her own happiness, in return for the financial security and status that marriage to him will offer her.
The Themes of Macbeth
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The Themes of Macbeth

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This powerpoint covers comprehensive themes: Ambition, Masculinity and Cruelty, The Divine Right of Kings, Tyranny, The Psychology of Guilt, Fate, Prophecy and Free Will, Violence, and The Ambiguity of Reality. There are a range of quotations for each theme, from different characters’ perspectives. Each slide has engaging images which should help to make your teaching memorable. An in depth approach to each slide is also available in my free videos on YouTube. You can find over 600 useful videos at Or follow the link to the precise video on Macbeth’s themes.
How to get 100% on Question 2 of Paper 1, especially in writing about sentence forms
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How to get 100% on Question 2 of Paper 1, especially in writing about sentence forms

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This is a comprehensive resource to teach your students how to get 100% in all aspects of the question. It teaches 11 different skills for the question: 1.Highlight the key words in the question which tell you what to look for 2.Highlight the margin of the part of the text you are told to look at 3.Find quotations as you read 4.Name a descriptive or narrative technique for each quotation you use (These will always be about imagery – simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration – and then perhaps onomatopoeia, sibilance, synesthesia, assonance, pathetic fallacy) 5.Refer to individual words in the quotation 6.Name their parts of speech – verb, adverb, noun, adjective 7.Find a long complex sentence, especially one with listed descriptions 8.Comment on the effect of contrast or juxtaposition, which will be in any description 9.Relate these quotations to the writer’s purpose, to discuss their effects 10.Use tentative language, like ‘perhaps’ to suggest your interpretation of the effect or purpose 11.Do not write in PEE paragraphs, but sentences which include embedded quotations It contains several models of how to write about complex sentences, with several practice paragraphs from Kipling, Conrad and Dickens for your students to practise on. It shows students how to model their own writing on that of other writers, using Brighton Rock. Students get to see why knowing parts of speech is so important to developing their own skills as writers. This then makes the job of writing about the effect of language features so much more easy and explicit for them. If you want to try without buying, all the PowerPoint is covered in a video at Mr Salles Teaches English, which you can find here: http://bit.ly/Question2Paper1 This PowerPoint is taken directly from The Mr Salles Guide to 100% in AQA English Language GCSE, which you can sample here: http://amzn.to/2phxxaS
AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4
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AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

6 Resources
This is an amazing bundle. It contains texts for every question, usually more than one. It gives you model answers for every question, annotated and explained, all at grade 9. It gives students the mark scheme in language they can understand, and tells them a series of clear steps to follow for each question. It includes a glossary of terms, covering skills like juxtaposition and allusion which helps access grades 8 and 9. It teaches 15 rhetorical techniques for each of questions 2, 3 and 4. And you get a mnemonic to help students remember them. In short, you won’t find a better bundle for this paper, anywhere. And, at 62% off, can you afford to turn this opportunity down?
Full Guide to All Characters of An Inspector Calls
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Full Guide to All Characters of An Inspector Calls

6 Resources
This amazing bundle is better than anything else on the market. CGP, York Notes, Collins, Mr Bruff all aim to the middle. These analyses show your students who to get grades 8 and 9 with each character. They’ll discover new interpretations they’ve never met before. They’ll see how to explore alternative viewpoints about each key moment in the play. They will decide whether the Inspector is supernatural, why the younger generation ultimately fail, how Priestley was even more worried about war than about capitalism and consider whether Priestley himself is an early feminist. Every page models essay writing in such a way that your students will move beyond PEE, and write in a more fluent style. And you get 67% off!
AQA  Question 3, The Structure Question Paper 1
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AQA Question 3, The Structure Question Paper 1

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This powerpoint teaches 5 key skills which are necessary to get full marks when writing about the structure of the text. The resource includes a full 8 mark answer, with annotations and explanations of how the answer meets all the criteria for Grade 9. This appears in both PPT and Word form, so is fully editable, and can easily be printed so that students can easily make relevant notes based on your teaching.
4 grade 9 Essay Plans for Great Expectations
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4 grade 9 Essay Plans for Great Expectations

4 Resources
There are on average 20 ideas for each essay, with 20 quotations to back them. The quotations are short extracts from the novel, to encourage students to select precise words to quote judiciously. Taken together, these essay plans will fully prepare your students for any question on Pip, Miss Havisham, Estella, Jaggers and Magwitch.
Analysis of Scrooge Through Pathetic Fallacy
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Analysis of Scrooge Through Pathetic Fallacy

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Use 8 short paragraphs describing Scrooge and the weather to explore how the weather mirrors the changes in Scrooge’s morality and personality. Teach how Dickens also uses contrast, repetition, personification, sibilance, alliteration to signpost the changes in Scrooge’s character. Show how the descriptions of weather in the countryside and the weather reveal Dickens’ attack on the problems of urbanisation and his campaign to persuade contemporary readers to change their attitude to the deserving poor. Teach students how Tiny Tim is a metaphor for Scrooge himself, and how his weak morality is rescued by Christmas and the child within.
English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4
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English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4

4 Resources
Quite simply, there is no more comprehensive guide to how to teach these 4 questions. It includes advice for students on each question, the mark schemes, sample questions, sample answers, plenty of fresh texts to practise on, a glossary of terms, how to move beyond PEE paragraphs and, if you are in the mood for more, over 30 English jokes. All in Word, for you to edit and reproduce as you please. And all for an unbelievably good price.
Writing to Inform
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Writing to Inform

4 Resources
Do you want a bundle which will equip your students with all the tools to write great informative writing and great travel writing? Would you like them to see models of grade 9 writing, fully explained? How about grade 6 writing which gets improved to grade 9? Will you give them a glossary of all the skills they will need, and numerous examples of each one, so that they can begin to use them themselves? Would you like more than 50% off?
Mrs Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis
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Mrs Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

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Mrs Birling as you’ve never thought of her before. This is an analysis which goes much deeper than you would expect. Here is a sample to show you what I mean: But What if Mrs Birling is Right? However, a counter argument to that is how Priestley reveals Eric’s exploitation of Eva last, as though to emphasise that his actions were worse. There is also a further counter argument. Eva could actually have accepted the stolen money. She could actually have accepted Eric’s offer of marriage. And she certainly did tell the charity and Mrs Birling a number of lies: • That she was called Mrs Birling. • That she was married. • That her husband had “deserted her”. So, in terms of the facts, she is quite right to say “The girl had begun by telling us a pack of lies.” When Eva tells her that she wouldn’t take stolen money, Sybil’s reaction “all a lot of nonsense – I didn’t believe a word of it” is not just snobbery. It is also a logical doubt to have given the lies which preceded it. Another psychological problem for Mrs Birling to accept is that Eva would rather commit suicide than take the stolen money, or marry Eric, even though she describes him as “he didn’t belong to her class, and was some drunken young idler”.
How to write a story based on a real character. Ideal for Paper 1 Question 5 of the AQA GCSE.
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How to write a story based on a real character. Ideal for Paper 1 Question 5 of the AQA GCSE.

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This story is written to model exactly what students should do to write a story that they can finish within 40 minutes, which is roughly the amount of writing time they get at GCSE. There are no published stories of around 500 words, so I have begun to write my own. Writing one on a real character takes away the fear of planning - students already know how the story starts. There are three copies of the story: 1. Without any annotation 2. With a key to the annotations which teach a range of skills many English teachers ignore: a. The Power of Verbs b. How to introduce the character in an interesting way c How to use humour, not jokes d How to build tension using contrast and juxtaposition e How dialogue must reveal character before plot f The power of repetition and rule of three, or triplets, in building a rhythm h Paragraphing for impact 3. With a key to the annotations which teach the more conventional story writing skills: a. Metaphor b. Similes c. Personification d. Alliteration e. Assonance, Half Rhyme and Hidden Alliteration Finally, you also get a completely free video on how to teach this at: http://bit.ly/WriteAboutARealCharacter The PowerPoint slides which teach this lesson, and which I use in the video are available as a separate resource.
Directed Writing for IGCSE
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Directed Writing for IGCSE

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This complete scheme of work teaches students through: Lesson activities to develop the skills of reading and writing Examiners's advice as well as the criteria Links to demonstration videos Ways to improve spelling and punctuation Assessments Model answers of varying quality for students to assess and improve A teaching sequence to use and remember Rhetorical techniques A mnemonic to remember these techniques: AH!FASTERCROCH A PLC (Personal Learning Checklist)
7 Secrets to Describing Like Dickens
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7 Secrets to Describing Like Dickens

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This very focused PPT takes an extract from Bleak House to show you 7 secrets of Dickens' description, including how to use contrast, why metaphor and personification trump metaphor, the power of listing and the subtlety of alliterative sound and rhythm. When we look at marking criteria we tend to befuddle the students with lists of descriptive techniques. Notice that listing, rhythm and contrast probably don't make it onto most teachers' lists, but these are the most powerful ways of improving their description. The kind of all writing techniques, or indeed the queen, is the use of the right verb. Dickens masters that too. The resource will also be linked to a video you can use to teach this, or plan your teaching from. Also included is the extract from Bleak House in Word.
14 Quotations to Teach Macbeth
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14 Quotations to Teach Macbeth

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This beautiful presentation will help your students remember the 14 most important quotations to think and write about Macbeth’s character. They are also presented in the order you would use them in an essay on Macbeth. Print them off as revision cards. Get your students to write paragraphs on the back, incorporating the quotation. Put them together to construct the essay. Use the best essays to teach the rest of your class how to succeed.
Analysis of Hyde. 5 Extracts. 5 Themes
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Analysis of Hyde. 5 Extracts. 5 Themes

6 Resources
This series of lessons will help your students select the key quotations they will need to write about when studying Hyde. Because it is linked to 5 Themes and further 5 Contextual purposes, your students will feel confident to tackle any question on Hyde. They will also be able to apply these to any question on the whole novel, or on Jekyll.