10 Original Grade 9 Short Stories

10 Original Grade 9 Short Stories

This is a unique resource, an anthology of original short stories to teach your 14-16 year old students how to craft short stories. Each one is utterly different, filled with real voices, amazing plot twists, and description you’ve never met before. Each one will act as a springboard to your students’ imaginations. You will also be able to deal with issues of the day: celebrity culture, feminism, homophobia, vegetarianism, drug abuse, cheating in sport… Each story is in a different genre. This really is a collection like no other. And all for an utterly amazing price, at 60% off!
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English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4

English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4

Quite simply, there is no more comprehensive guide to how to teach these 4 questions. It includes advice for students on each question, the mark schemes, sample questions, sample answers, plenty of fresh texts to practise on, a glossary of terms, how to move beyond PEE paragraphs and, if you are in the mood for more, over 30 English jokes. All in Word, for you to edit and reproduce as you please. And all for an unbelievably good price.
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AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

This is an amazing bundle. It contains texts for every question, usually more than one. It gives you model answers for every question, annotated and explained, all at grade 9. It gives students the mark scheme in language they can understand, and tells them a series of clear steps to follow for each question. It includes a glossary of terms, covering skills like juxtaposition and allusion which helps access grades 8 and 9. It teaches 15 rhetorical techniques for each of questions 2, 3 and 4. And you get a mnemonic to help students remember them. In short, you won’t find a better bundle for this paper, anywhere. And, at 62% off, can you afford to turn this opportunity down?
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Full Guide to All Characters of An Inspector Calls

Full Guide to All Characters of An Inspector Calls

This amazing bundle is better than anything else on the market. CGP, York Notes, Collins, Mr Bruff all aim to the middle. These analyses show your students who to get grades 8 and 9 with each character. They’ll discover new interpretations they’ve never met before. They’ll see how to explore alternative viewpoints about each key moment in the play. They will decide whether the Inspector is supernatural, why the younger generation ultimately fail, how Priestley was even more worried about war than about capitalism and consider whether Priestley himself is an early feminist. Every page models essay writing in such a way that your students will move beyond PEE, and write in a more fluent style. And you get 67% off!
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Inspector Goole: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Inspector Goole: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

This resource is so comprehensive, that it also explains the whole of the play. Because the Inspector deals with every character, the whole play is covered. Because he is the proxy for Priestley’s viewpoint, every possible exam question can be answered simply by knowing this resource. Can your students do without it? Try a flavour of it in this extract:
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The Younger Generation v The Older Generation Grade 9 Essay

The Younger Generation v The Older Generation Grade 9 Essay

This resource teaches students how to use Here is an extract to show you what this resource teaches. What does the AQA mark scheme say? Convincing Critical analysis Conceptualised Exploration of context to author’s and contemporary readers’ perspectives Give interpretation(s) Response to the whole text Analyse it as a play, and deal with the structure Precise references Analysis of writer’s methods Subject terminology used judiciously Exploration of effects of writer’s methods on reader They basically mean this: What you must do Give more than one interpretation of the characters or events. Make sure you write about Priestley’s viewpoint and ideas about his society at the time, in 1945 Write about how the society of 1945 would respond to these ideas, characters and events. Write about the ending of the play, to show how characters have or haven’t changed Write about the ending to show Priestley’s viewpoint. When you do it, make sure you Embed quotations all the time Only use terminology if it helps explain an idea Better still, go back and look at the words in bold in the short essay. This is subject terminology. What does “subject terminology” mean? The words a student of literature at university would use in nearly every literature essay. You could argue that connectives fall under this category as well, if you want. How do you integrate context? All the italics in the short essay is context. Sometimes this is the context of the world inside the play, at other times it is Priestley’s viewpoint and history, and at others it is the shared experience or viewpoints of his contemporary audience. You should notice that it is impossible to write about any author’s purpose or viewpoint without delving into context, which makes it very easy to integrate as part of the evidence for your interpretation. Now we’ve read the key criteria from Edexcel, you can see that “what you must do”, and “make sure you” work perfectly for this exam board as well. There’s a reason for that, whichever exam board you study: literature essays always demand the same skills.
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Writing to Inform

Writing to Inform

Do you want a bundle which will equip your students with all the tools to write great informative writing and great travel writing? Would you like them to see models of grade 9 writing, fully explained? How about grade 6 writing which gets improved to grade 9? Will you give them a glossary of all the skills they will need, and numerous examples of each one, so that they can begin to use them themselves? Would you like more than 50% off?
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An Inspector Calls: Full Historical and Political Context

An Inspector Calls: Full Historical and Political Context

16 pages of incredible detail made relevant to the play. Obviously, socialism and capitalism are defined. But it includes some amazing parallels between the 1940s and the present day, where the figures for the richest and poorest in society are nearly identical. Explore the extraordinary similarity between the Inspector’s words, and those of the Labour party manifesto of 1945. See how the great unrest, including strikes and killing of workers influened Priestley and his play. Discover the literary tradition Priestley’s play was responding to, and the impulse not to write about WW1. Find out why Priestley chose the cotton mills as his manufacturing business, and why this was so important in 1945. All these facts are explicitly matched to the play, so students can see how to use them in their essays.
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Writing to Inform, Move From Grade 6 to Grade 9

Writing to Inform, Move From Grade 6 to Grade 9

This resource includes two model pieces of writing, one at grade 6, the other at grade 9. Apart from the marking criteria, the grade 6 is characterised as such because it has several weaknesses: It’s too short for 40 minutes of writing Too many paragraphs start the same way Too many sentences start the same way There are few rhetorical devices (MAD FATHERS CROCH) Although it shows off with commas, it doesn’t show off other punctuation Although the beginning is a little original, the ending isn’t Paragraphs are organized, but not crafted for impact The grade 9 piece is divided into one sentence per slide, to show 3 rhetorical devices in each, which are made explicit. These are rhetorical devices contained in the mnemonic MAD FATHERS CROCH. The most powerful one of these, in that it helps facilitate most of the others, is the use of Triplets. There are also two instructional videos for this resource, one aimed at why students get stuck at grade 6. The other is explicit about how to get grade 9.
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Older v Younger Generation: Grade 9 Essay Writing.

Older v Younger Generation: Grade 9 Essay Writing.

Teach your students how to use the indicative content to write their revision essay. Then show them how to refine this to a grade 9 essay which can be done under exam conditions. Next teach them from the model. Show exactly how it meets all the exam criteria for AQA and Edexcel. Here is an extract:
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Arthur Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Arthur Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Arthur Birling in more depth than you ever thought possible. I guarantee you’ll never see him the same way again. Here is an extract to show you what I mean: Social Class is More Damaging to Society Than Capitalism However, as we have seen, this sacking actually led to a better job at Milwards. In this way, capitalism is not the direct cause of her tragedy. Social class, and the immorality of the upper classes, however, is responsible. Birling feels able to justify this cruelty by referring to how much paying his employees would cost the business, “Well it’s my duty to keep labour costs down” rather than increase them by “twelve percent”. Of course, while this seems cruel, it is also true. By 1945, as you will see later in the guide, Britain had lost its monopoly on the cotton trade, precisely because foreign competitors could pay their workers much less. Priestley understands Birling’s view on wages, and knows many in his audience will share it, which is why he has worked so hard to discredit everything else about him. He hopes this will make the audience more likely to question their own belief about fair wages. Priestley also uses Birling quite subtly to criticise the upper classes. Birling has become successful through business, he wasn’t born into privilege. This is the opposite of his son, Eric, who he now criticises, “That’s something this public-school-and-varsity life you’ve had doesn’t seem to teach you.” Even Birling is critical of the effect of being brought up as part of the ruling classes. This symbolises his message to his wealthy audience, a warning to stop trying to climb the social hierarchy, and instead make society fairer. Why pursue higher social status when it will only damage your character? We will see that most when we find out how Gerald and Eric are most responsible for Eva’s tragedy.
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Mrs Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Mrs Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Mrs Birling as you’ve never thought of her before. This is an analysis which goes much deeper than you would expect. Here is a sample to show you what I mean: But What if Mrs Birling is Right? However, a counter argument to that is how Priestley reveals Eric’s exploitation of Eva last, as though to emphasise that his actions were worse. There is also a further counter argument. Eva could actually have accepted the stolen money. She could actually have accepted Eric’s offer of marriage. And she certainly did tell the charity and Mrs Birling a number of lies: • That she was called Mrs Birling. • That she was married. • That her husband had “deserted her”. So, in terms of the facts, she is quite right to say “The girl had begun by telling us a pack of lies.” When Eva tells her that she wouldn’t take stolen money, Sybil’s reaction “all a lot of nonsense – I didn’t believe a word of it” is not just snobbery. It is also a logical doubt to have given the lies which preceded it. Another psychological problem for Mrs Birling to accept is that Eva would rather commit suicide than take the stolen money, or marry Eric, even though she describes him as “he didn’t belong to her class, and was some drunken young idler”.
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Gerald Croft: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Gerald Croft: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

This is a really in depth analysis of Gerald, and you will see him differently after you have read it. Your students will have a completely new perspective. Here is an extract to show you what I mean: Gerald’s Affair with Daisy Renton Although Sheila is the first to expose Gerald’s affair at the start, the language they both use strongly hints that she will forgive him after breaking off the engagement and that, after the end of the play, they will marry. Gerald’s first impulse is to lie, because Priestley wants to present all capitalists as hypocrites. He denies knowing any “Eva Smith”. Sheila points out that she knows he is simply using his intelligence to maintain a veneer of honesty, as he knew her as “Daisy Renton”. This is called sophistry – using clever arguments which appear true but which the speaker knows to be false. Although Sheila insists on the truth, her language is also a kind of sophistry. She uses euphemism. Instead of asking for how long he had sex with Daisy, she only insists he “knew her very well”. This is important, as while she is at her most angry now, her own language minimises what he has done. This will make it much easier for her to forgive him in the future. Clever as he is, Gerald picks up on this weakness in her resolve, calling her “darling” in order to manipulate her. He immediately asks her to keep the affair secret from The Inspector. This might seem astonishingly arrogant. However, Priestley is again showing the corruption of the patriarchy. He expects a woman to protect him even at the expense of her own happiness, in return for the financial security and status that marriage to him will offer her.
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Glossary of Language Features for Grade 9

Glossary of Language Features for Grade 9

This resource has numerous examples of language features for you to teach your students how to both recognise the writer’s craft, and use them in their own writing. Here is a sample: Juxtaposition: two things that are put close together in order to emphasise the difference between them. • “Give us a pound, mister,” said the beggar, scrolling through the internet on his phone. • The mother, tortured with pain, now smiled beatifically, while the baby, newly released, screamed incessantly. • While the battle raged, the generals sat behind the front lines, drinking beers and stuffing three course meals. Repetition: repeating a word, phrase, or idea. This can be done to emphasise, to create a rhythm or tone, or to reveal a contrast or comparison. Register: In linguistics, a register is a variety of a language used for a particular purpose or in a particular setting. What words give this the register of colloquial, American teenage language? “(Candace runs out to the backyard, she stares in shock upon seeing the rollercoaster, along with horror music) Candace: Phineas, what is this?! Phineas: Do you like it? Candace: Ooh, I’m gonna tell Mom, and when she sees what you’re doing, you are going down. (runs off) Down! Down! Down! D-O-W-N, down!” Which words deal with the idea of writing a novel? “In my mind, I continually entertain myself with fragments of narrative, dialogue and plot twists but as soon as I’m in front of a blank page, they evaporate. I feel stuck. Sometimes I think I should give up, but I have convinced myself that if I can find a way to write more freely and suppress my inner critic, I could finally finish that first draft.”
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How to Write a Grade 9 Article

How to Write a Grade 9 Article

How to write an article. This shows students how to move from grades 5 to 6, 6 to 7, 7 to 8 and 9. It also teaches 10 techniques that will get students grades 7 and above: Start each sentence with a different word Write about the future Not only…but Show me…show me Pair your verbs for emphasis Extend your simile or metaphor Anecdote The contrasting power of ‘but’ Humorous comparison Go to town on triplets. More anecdotes. Load your sentences with techniques which fit
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How to Write a Personal Response, Using An Inspector Calls

How to Write a Personal Response, Using An Inspector Calls

AO1: The Ability to Quote and Explore Interpretations, Including Personal Response The presentation takes students through these four skills: Begin with the author’s purpose Link the author’s purpose to symbolism Refer to the characters as a construct Propose an alternative interpretation Watch my video to see how to teach it.
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Two Informative Texts: 21st and 19th Century Travel Writing (Paper 2)

Two Informative Texts: 21st and 19th Century Travel Writing (Paper 2)

Here is the beginning of the 21st C text, ideal to teach informative writing for Question 5, or how to analyse informative features, for Question 4. Dubrovnik: city of nightmares, or city of dreams? There are few less likely victims of war. Dubrovnik’s thick stone walls stand defiantly on cliff tops, cradled by mountains, an imposing and forbidding barrier to siege. Soldiers would fire down from a hundred feet up, from fortifications far taller than the puny castles you might be used to at home. Magnificent walls, the backdrop to a charming harbour. Yet, as you walk the battlements, gasping at the beauty of the town enclosed within the womb shaped walls, you are struck by a subtle shift in colour. New, tiled roofs abound, like an orange carpet. In 1991 the Serbians attacked from the skies, dropping missiles to spread terror in this most beautiful of preserved cities. The miracle of design, three and four-foot-thick walls built to defeat earthquakes, astonishingly swallowed up the fires and explosions from the skies. The flames burnt out, starved of fuel, even where whole streets are only about eight feet apart. So yes. Dubrovnik is something of a miracle, a survivor with its whole history intact.
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Comparing Texts, Paper 2, Question 2

Comparing Texts, Paper 2, Question 2

This resource includes: 9 Steps: Just tell me what to do Sample question What does the examiner really want? To sample texts Student misconceptions and the need to infer even though the question does not specify this. Question 2 Just tell me what to do Model answer Model answer annotated for inference Model answer rewritten so that it can be done by a student in 200 words Here is the beginning of the model answer: Below is the model answer again. Bold and green shows you where it infers. Phelps and Finley are both female writers with similar experiences of writing, but they have completely different attitudes to their work. Phelps combines writing with motherhood, as her daughter remembers “I cannot remember one hour in which her children needed her and did not find her”. So perhaps this explains her desire to write children’s stories “written for ourselves” (her children) and not for public consumption. In contrast, Finley chooses to remain a “spinster” and also published books “for children”, rather than keeping it for her own children. Although she has no children of her own, so she could have written them for those she taught or for those in “Sunday school”. Both women suffered from ill health. Finley seems, to a modern reader, to have little wrong with her, as she survives many years in apparent ill health: “has been an invalid for a number of years and has done much of her writing while prostrated by illness.” It is unlikely that a writer could continue with serious illness, as Phelps’ history indicates. Phelps died, according to her daughter, apparently from overwork, “The struggle killed her, but she fought till she fell”. This is in complete contrast to Finley, who despite her claimed illness wrote many books and looked a picture of good health, with “a figure inclined to plumpness. Her hair is snow white.”
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Analyse Language in the Non Fiction (Paper 2, Question 3)

Analyse Language in the Non Fiction (Paper 2, Question 3)

This resource includes: Sample question Sample text 8 Steps: Just tell me what to do Annotated text, to show students how to think about language Model answer using all the analysis, 450 words Model answer reworked to be student length, 250 words Explanation of the mark scheme, applied to the model This is the beginning of the sample analysis: Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views *Five minutes’ walking brings you to the fair itself; a scene calculated to awaken very different feelings. The * • Direct address places us directly at the scene • Dickens foreshadows the text by signposting us towards different feelings to bring it to life • He writes in the present tense to make the experience more immediate and real entrance is occupied on either side by the vendors of gingerbread and toys: the stalls are gaily lighted up, • Adjective ‘gaily’ to describe the lighting actually describes the mood and atmosphere the most attractive goods profusely disposed, and un-bonneted young ladies induce you to purchase half a • Long clauses keep us at the scene, as though giving us time to look at the listed sights • Perhaps male readers of the time are enticed by the provocative detail that the ladies are both “young” and “unbonneted”, the adjectives suggesting they are therefore attractive. • The assonance of “o” emphasises how “profuse” the pleasures are, and in forming the letter “o” the mouth is forced into an expression of wonder (19th century readers would be used to reading to their families out loud). • The juxtaposition of the “young ladies” with “the most attractive goods” encourages the male reader to see the women as commodities to be enjoyed. It is a sexist allusion to women as objects. *pound of the real spice nuts, of which the majority of the regular fair-goers carry a pound or two as a present *
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Comapre Methods in Non Fiction (Paper 2 Question 4)

Comapre Methods in Non Fiction (Paper 2 Question 4)

What this resource includes: Sample question 6 Steps: Just tell me what to do The mark scheme explained Mnemonic for persuasive techniques: MAD FATHERS CROCH 19th century text Original modern text Perfect model answer to teach from, 530 words Perfect model answer annotated and explained How to analyse a writer’s tone How to infer Here is the beginning of the model answer: Model Answer Dominic Salles uses direct address to take the reader on a journey around the city, “as you walk the battlements”. While Salles tours this city, Dickens uses direct address to take the reader to the centre of Greenwich fair, “imagine yourself… in the very centre and heart of the fair.” Both writers therefore experience the city on foot. This metaphor, and the positive connotations of “heart”, imply that the fair will be a joyous experience. Salles begins with similar praise, using the hyperbole of the reader “gasping at the beauty of the town.” However, Salles takes the reader on a series of experiences which will make the reader wish to leave. Thus the alliteration of “cramped and crowded” lanes emphasises how little you might enjoy walking the streets. He uses the threatening simile of tourists “swarming like locusts” to convey his horror at being trapped in the crowds. In contrast, Dickens celebrates being in “an extremely dense crowd”, using language from the semantic field of play, so that the crowd “swings you to and fro” like a game, before delivering you to the “centre”.
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Writing to Argue, Persuade and Inform for Paper 2 Question 5

Writing to Argue, Persuade and Inform for Paper 2 Question 5

Here are five texts to teach from, model answers for questions on argue, persuade and inform, and 15 rhetorical techniques to teach your students. Better than that, these 15 techniques are made explicit in each of the texts, and in the three model answers. Does any other resource help your students see how to get 100% in Question 5, no matter what the question?
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AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

This is an amazing bundle. It contains texts for every question, usually more than one. It gives you model answers for every question, annotated and explained, all at grade 9. It gives students the mark scheme in language they can understand, and tells them a series of clear steps to follow for each question. It includes a glossary of terms, covering skills like juxtaposition and allusion which helps access grades 8 and 9. It teaches 15 rhetorical techniques for each of questions 2, 3 and 4. And you get a mnemonic to help students remember them. In short, you won’t find a better bundle for this paper, anywhere. And, at 62% off, can you afford to turn this opportunity down?
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