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The Slightly Awesome Teacher's Shop

All my resources are aimed at teaching students to the top, that's the USP! You can find them on the UK's second largest English teaching channel, Mr Salles Teaches English, and also see how I deliver them there. If you want to be an even better teacher, try The Slightly Awesome Techer, https://amzn.to/2GtQu6l

All my resources are aimed at teaching students to the top, that's the USP! You can find them on the UK's second largest English teaching channel, Mr Salles Teaches English, and also see how I deliver them there. If you want to be an even better teacher, try The Slightly Awesome Techer, https://amzn.to/2GtQu6l
10 Original Grade 9 Short Stories

10 Original Grade 9 Short Stories

This is a unique resource, an anthology of original short stories to teach your 14-16 year old students how to craft short stories. Each one is utterly different, filled with real voices, amazing plot twists, and description you’ve never met before. Each one will act as a springboard to your students’ imaginations. You will also be able to deal with issues of the day: celebrity culture, feminism, homophobia, vegetarianism, drug abuse, cheating in sport… Each story is in a different genre. This really is a collection like no other. And all for an utterly amazing price, at 60% off!
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English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4

English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4

Quite simply, there is no more comprehensive guide to how to teach these 4 questions. It includes advice for students on each question, the mark schemes, sample questions, sample answers, plenty of fresh texts to practise on, a glossary of terms, how to move beyond PEE paragraphs and, if you are in the mood for more, over 30 English jokes. All in Word, for you to edit and reproduce as you please. And all for an unbelievably good price.
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AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

This is an amazing bundle. It contains texts for every question, usually more than one. It gives you model answers for every question, annotated and explained, all at grade 9. It gives students the mark scheme in language they can understand, and tells them a series of clear steps to follow for each question. It includes a glossary of terms, covering skills like juxtaposition and allusion which helps access grades 8 and 9. It teaches 15 rhetorical techniques for each of questions 2, 3 and 4. And you get a mnemonic to help students remember them. In short, you won’t find a better bundle for this paper, anywhere. And, at 62% off, can you afford to turn this opportunity down?
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Grade 9 Extract Essay on Jekyll and Hyde

Grade 9 Extract Essay on Jekyll and Hyde

Learn the 12 techniques my students used in getting grades 8 and 9 in the 2017 exams. Use these to show students what to do, rather than refer to wordy and ambiguous mark schemes. Use a PPT with highlighted paragraphs of the full essay, all coded with the 12 techniques. See which 3 skills are demanded of the best conclusion. Also included is the whole essay in Word.
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The Themes of Macbeth

The Themes of Macbeth

This powerpoint covers comprehensive themes: Ambition, Masculinity and Cruelty, The Divine Right of Kings, Tyranny, The Psychology of Guilt, Fate, Prophecy and Free Will, Violence, and The Ambiguity of Reality. There are a range of quotations for each theme, from different characters’ perspectives. Each slide has engaging images which should help to make your teaching memorable. An in depth approach to each slide is also available in my free videos on YouTube. You can find over 600 useful videos at Or follow the link to the precise video on Macbeth’s themes.
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How to get 100% on Question 2 of Paper 1, especially in writing about sentence forms

How to get 100% on Question 2 of Paper 1, especially in writing about sentence forms

This is a comprehensive resource to teach your students how to get 100% in all aspects of the question. It teaches 11 different skills for the question: 1.Highlight the key words in the question which tell you what to look for 2.Highlight the margin of the part of the text you are told to look at 3.Find quotations as you read 4.Name a descriptive or narrative technique for each quotation you use (These will always be about imagery – simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration – and then perhaps onomatopoeia, sibilance, synesthesia, assonance, pathetic fallacy) 5.Refer to individual words in the quotation 6.Name their parts of speech – verb, adverb, noun, adjective 7.Find a long complex sentence, especially one with listed descriptions 8.Comment on the effect of contrast or juxtaposition, which will be in any description 9.Relate these quotations to the writer’s purpose, to discuss their effects 10.Use tentative language, like ‘perhaps’ to suggest your interpretation of the effect or purpose 11.Do not write in PEE paragraphs, but sentences which include embedded quotations It contains several models of how to write about complex sentences, with several practice paragraphs from Kipling, Conrad and Dickens for your students to practise on. It shows students how to model their own writing on that of other writers, using Brighton Rock. Students get to see why knowing parts of speech is so important to developing their own skills as writers. This then makes the job of writing about the effect of language features so much more easy and explicit for them. If you want to try without buying, all the PowerPoint is covered in a video at Mr Salles Teaches English, which you can find here: http://bit.ly/Question2Paper1 This PowerPoint is taken directly from The Mr Salles Guide to 100% in AQA English Language GCSE, which you can sample here: http://amzn.to/2phxxaS
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AQA  Question 3, The Structure Question Paper 1

AQA Question 3, The Structure Question Paper 1

This powerpoint teaches 5 key skills which are necessary to get full marks when writing about the structure of the text. The resource includes a full 8 mark answer, with annotations and explanations of how the answer meets all the criteria for Grade 9. This appears in both PPT and Word form, so is fully editable, and can easily be printed so that students can easily make relevant notes based on your teaching.
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Full Guide to All Characters of An Inspector Calls

Full Guide to All Characters of An Inspector Calls

This amazing bundle is better than anything else on the market. CGP, York Notes, Collins, Mr Bruff all aim to the middle. These analyses show your students who to get grades 8 and 9 with each character. They’ll discover new interpretations they’ve never met before. They’ll see how to explore alternative viewpoints about each key moment in the play. They will decide whether the Inspector is supernatural, why the younger generation ultimately fail, how Priestley was even more worried about war than about capitalism and consider whether Priestley himself is an early feminist. Every page models essay writing in such a way that your students will move beyond PEE, and write in a more fluent style. And you get 67% off!
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English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4

English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4

Quite simply, there is no more comprehensive guide to how to teach these 4 questions. It includes advice for students on each question, the mark schemes, sample questions, sample answers, plenty of fresh texts to practise on, a glossary of terms, how to move beyond PEE paragraphs and, if you are in the mood for more, over 30 English jokes. All in Word, for you to edit and reproduce as you please. And all for an unbelievably good price.
theslightlyawesometeacher
Mrs Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Mrs Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Mrs Birling as you’ve never thought of her before. This is an analysis which goes much deeper than you would expect. Here is a sample to show you what I mean: But What if Mrs Birling is Right? However, a counter argument to that is how Priestley reveals Eric’s exploitation of Eva last, as though to emphasise that his actions were worse. There is also a further counter argument. Eva could actually have accepted the stolen money. She could actually have accepted Eric’s offer of marriage. And she certainly did tell the charity and Mrs Birling a number of lies: • That she was called Mrs Birling. • That she was married. • That her husband had “deserted her”. So, in terms of the facts, she is quite right to say “The girl had begun by telling us a pack of lies.” When Eva tells her that she wouldn’t take stolen money, Sybil’s reaction “all a lot of nonsense – I didn’t believe a word of it” is not just snobbery. It is also a logical doubt to have given the lies which preceded it. Another psychological problem for Mrs Birling to accept is that Eva would rather commit suicide than take the stolen money, or marry Eric, even though she describes him as “he didn’t belong to her class, and was some drunken young idler”.
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Glossary of Language Features for Grade 9

Glossary of Language Features for Grade 9

This resource has numerous examples of language features for you to teach your students how to both recognise the writer’s craft, and use them in their own writing. Here is a sample: Juxtaposition: two things that are put close together in order to emphasise the difference between them. • “Give us a pound, mister,” said the beggar, scrolling through the internet on his phone. • The mother, tortured with pain, now smiled beatifically, while the baby, newly released, screamed incessantly. • While the battle raged, the generals sat behind the front lines, drinking beers and stuffing three course meals. Repetition: repeating a word, phrase, or idea. This can be done to emphasise, to create a rhythm or tone, or to reveal a contrast or comparison. Register: In linguistics, a register is a variety of a language used for a particular purpose or in a particular setting. What words give this the register of colloquial, American teenage language? “(Candace runs out to the backyard, she stares in shock upon seeing the rollercoaster, along with horror music) Candace: Phineas, what is this?! Phineas: Do you like it? Candace: Ooh, I’m gonna tell Mom, and when she sees what you’re doing, you are going down. (runs off) Down! Down! Down! D-O-W-N, down!” Which words deal with the idea of writing a novel? “In my mind, I continually entertain myself with fragments of narrative, dialogue and plot twists but as soon as I’m in front of a blank page, they evaporate. I feel stuck. Sometimes I think I should give up, but I have convinced myself that if I can find a way to write more freely and suppress my inner critic, I could finally finish that first draft.”
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Arthur Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Arthur Birling: Complete Grade 9 Analysis

Arthur Birling in more depth than you ever thought possible. I guarantee you’ll never see him the same way again. Here is an extract to show you what I mean: Social Class is More Damaging to Society Than Capitalism However, as we have seen, this sacking actually led to a better job at Milwards. In this way, capitalism is not the direct cause of her tragedy. Social class, and the immorality of the upper classes, however, is responsible. Birling feels able to justify this cruelty by referring to how much paying his employees would cost the business, “Well it’s my duty to keep labour costs down” rather than increase them by “twelve percent”. Of course, while this seems cruel, it is also true. By 1945, as you will see later in the guide, Britain had lost its monopoly on the cotton trade, precisely because foreign competitors could pay their workers much less. Priestley understands Birling’s view on wages, and knows many in his audience will share it, which is why he has worked so hard to discredit everything else about him. He hopes this will make the audience more likely to question their own belief about fair wages. Priestley also uses Birling quite subtly to criticise the upper classes. Birling has become successful through business, he wasn’t born into privilege. This is the opposite of his son, Eric, who he now criticises, “That’s something this public-school-and-varsity life you’ve had doesn’t seem to teach you.” Even Birling is critical of the effect of being brought up as part of the ruling classes. This symbolises his message to his wealthy audience, a warning to stop trying to climb the social hierarchy, and instead make society fairer. Why pursue higher social status when it will only damage your character? We will see that most when we find out how Gerald and Eric are most responsible for Eva’s tragedy.
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Directed Writing for IGCSE

Directed Writing for IGCSE

This complete scheme of work teaches students through: Lesson activities to develop the skills of reading and writing Examiners's advice as well as the criteria Links to demonstration videos Ways to improve spelling and punctuation Assessments Model answers of varying quality for students to assess and improve A teaching sequence to use and remember Rhetorical techniques A mnemonic to remember these techniques: AH!FASTERCROCH A PLC (Personal Learning Checklist)
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5 Contextual Purposes to Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

5 Contextual Purposes to Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

There are 59 ppt slides giving historical context, quotation and interpretation to five key purposes Stevenson may have had in the novella: 1. to tap into the Victoria psyche and fascination with crime and violence 2. to expose the hypocrisy of the middle classes, who he sees as morally corrupt 3. to question the role of God and Christianity 4. to examine the possibility that we are all, at root, simply animals, without a soul. 5. to suggest the homosexuality should not be a crime. Students who understand all of these will almost inevitably be able to access grades 7 and above. You can also find accompanying videos for each of these viewpoints on my YouTube channel, Mr Salles Teaches English, to accompany the slides.
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How to write a story based on a real character. Ideal for Paper 1 Question 5 of the AQA GCSE.

How to write a story based on a real character. Ideal for Paper 1 Question 5 of the AQA GCSE.

This story is written to model exactly what students should do to write a story that they can finish within 40 minutes, which is roughly the amount of writing time they get at GCSE. There are no published stories of around 500 words, so I have begun to write my own. Writing one on a real character takes away the fear of planning - students already know how the story starts. There are three copies of the story: 1. Without any annotation 2. With a key to the annotations which teach a range of skills many English teachers ignore: a. The Power of Verbs b. How to introduce the character in an interesting way c How to use humour, not jokes d How to build tension using contrast and juxtaposition e How dialogue must reveal character before plot f The power of repetition and rule of three, or triplets, in building a rhythm h Paragraphing for impact 3. With a key to the annotations which teach the more conventional story writing skills: a. Metaphor b. Similes c. Personification d. Alliteration e. Assonance, Half Rhyme and Hidden Alliteration Finally, you also get a completely free video on how to teach this at: http://bit.ly/WriteAboutARealCharacter The PowerPoint slides which teach this lesson, and which I use in the video are available as a separate resource.
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Writing to Inform

Writing to Inform

Do you want a bundle which will equip your students with all the tools to write great informative writing and great travel writing? Would you like them to see models of grade 9 writing, fully explained? How about grade 6 writing which gets improved to grade 9? Will you give them a glossary of all the skills they will need, and numerous examples of each one, so that they can begin to use them themselves? Would you like more than 50% off?
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AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

This is an amazing bundle. It contains texts for every question, usually more than one. It gives you model answers for every question, annotated and explained, all at grade 9. It gives students the mark scheme in language they can understand, and tells them a series of clear steps to follow for each question. It includes a glossary of terms, covering skills like juxtaposition and allusion which helps access grades 8 and 9. It teaches 15 rhetorical techniques for each of questions 2, 3 and 4. And you get a mnemonic to help students remember them. In short, you won’t find a better bundle for this paper, anywhere. And, at 62% off, can you afford to turn this opportunity down?
theslightlyawesometeacher
Analysis of Hyde. 5 Extracts. 5 Themes

Analysis of Hyde. 5 Extracts. 5 Themes

This series of lessons will help your students select the key quotations they will need to write about when studying Hyde. Because it is linked to 5 Themes and further 5 Contextual purposes, your students will feel confident to tackle any question on Hyde. They will also be able to apply these to any question on the whole novel, or on Jekyll.
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How to Write a Grade 9 Article

How to Write a Grade 9 Article

How to write an article. This shows students how to move from grades 5 to 6, 6 to 7, 7 to 8 and 9. It also teaches 10 techniques that will get students grades 7 and above: Start each sentence with a different word Write about the future Not only…but Show me…show me Pair your verbs for emphasis Extend your simile or metaphor Anecdote The contrasting power of ‘but’ Humorous comparison Go to town on triplets. More anecdotes. Load your sentences with techniques which fit
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14 Quotations to Teach Macbeth

14 Quotations to Teach Macbeth

This beautiful presentation will help your students remember the 14 most important quotations to think and write about Macbeth’s character. They are also presented in the order you would use them in an essay on Macbeth. Print them off as revision cards. Get your students to write paragraphs on the back, incorporating the quotation. Put them together to construct the essay. Use the best essays to teach the rest of your class how to succeed.
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