Hero image

Mr Salles Teaches English

Average Rating3.17
(based on 24 reviews)

All my resources are aimed at teaching students to the top, that's the USP! You can find them on the UK's second largest English teaching channel, Mr Salles Teaches English, and also see how I deliver them there. If you want to be an even better teacher, try The Slightly Awesome Techer, https://amzn.to/2GtQu6l

103Uploads

64k+Views

7k+Downloads

All my resources are aimed at teaching students to the top, that's the USP! You can find them on the UK's second largest English teaching channel, Mr Salles Teaches English, and also see how I deliver them there. If you want to be an even better teacher, try The Slightly Awesome Techer, https://amzn.to/2GtQu6l
The Themes of Macbeth
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

The Themes of Macbeth

(3)
This powerpoint covers comprehensive themes: Ambition, Masculinity and Cruelty, The Divine Right of Kings, Tyranny, The Psychology of Guilt, Fate, Prophecy and Free Will, Violence, and The Ambiguity of Reality. There are a range of quotations for each theme, from different characters’ perspectives. Each slide has engaging images which should help to make your teaching memorable. An in depth approach to each slide is also available in my free videos on YouTube. You can find over 600 useful videos at Or follow the link to the precise video on Macbeth’s themes.
Writing to Inform and Explain
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

Writing to Inform and Explain

(0)
What this resource includes: Mnemonic to remember rhetorical, persuasive techniques: MAD FATHERS CROCH How to plan an answer 9 skills necessary in a top answer The mark scheme explained Model answer, grade 6 Model answer, grade 9 Model answer, annotated and explained Why exam topics will never be interesting Sample topics and question Here is the beginning of the model text: Annotated 100% Model: Writing to Inform Every actor wants to be Tom Cruise, and every actress longs to be Jenifer Lawrence. So why settle for Danny Dyer and Letitia Dean? 1. Contrasting pair 2. Rhetorical question 3. Alliteration You wouldn’t, and you shouldn’t. It’s exactly the same thing with revision guides. Yes, they come with pretty pictures, and jokes, and everything is chunk sized so that it fits a single page. Emotive language Repetition Triplets Creating an enemy But do they push you, pull you, and propel you to get a grade 8 or 9? Alliteration Contrast Triplet You’ve spotted that’s a rhetorical question, but do you know the other 14 rhetorical devices? Direct address Contrasting pair Rhetorical question Mr Salles won’t just list them: by the time you finish his guide, you will know them by heart. Fact. Contrasting pair Direct address Opinion Mr Salles believes that all students can ace the English language exam; that every student can learn from beyond grade 9 answers that are properly explained; that every student can remember if they are shown how. Emotive language Triplet Repetition
AQA  Question 3, The Structure Question Paper 1
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

AQA Question 3, The Structure Question Paper 1

(1)
This powerpoint teaches 5 key skills which are necessary to get full marks when writing about the structure of the text. The resource includes a full 8 mark answer, with annotations and explanations of how the answer meets all the criteria for Grade 9. This appears in both PPT and Word form, so is fully editable, and can easily be printed so that students can easily make relevant notes based on your teaching.
Full Guide to All Characters of An Inspector Calls
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

Full Guide to All Characters of An Inspector Calls

6 Resources
This amazing bundle is better than anything else on the market. CGP, York Notes, Collins, Mr Bruff all aim to the middle. These analyses show your students who to get grades 8 and 9 with each character. They’ll discover new interpretations they’ve never met before. They’ll see how to explore alternative viewpoints about each key moment in the play. They will decide whether the Inspector is supernatural, why the younger generation ultimately fail, how Priestley was even more worried about war than about capitalism and consider whether Priestley himself is an early feminist. Every page models essay writing in such a way that your students will move beyond PEE, and write in a more fluent style. And you get 67% off!
AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

AQA Paper 2, Questions 1 to 4

6 Resources
This is an amazing bundle. It contains texts for every question, usually more than one. It gives you model answers for every question, annotated and explained, all at grade 9. It gives students the mark scheme in language they can understand, and tells them a series of clear steps to follow for each question. It includes a glossary of terms, covering skills like juxtaposition and allusion which helps access grades 8 and 9. It teaches 15 rhetorical techniques for each of questions 2, 3 and 4. And you get a mnemonic to help students remember them. In short, you won’t find a better bundle for this paper, anywhere. And, at 62% off, can you afford to turn this opportunity down?
All the Themes of An Inspector Calls
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

All the Themes of An Inspector Calls

(0)
This comprehensive and beautiful resource teaches all the themes of An Inspector Calls. It is filled with detail which will help most students access grade 7, and the more able to get grades 8 and 9. It summarises most of The Mr Salles Guide to An Inspector Calls, which you can see on Amazon https://amzn.to/2DDPl91 Each PPT slide can be printed as a revision card there are 32 in total. A video showing you how to teach from it is also included. You can play this to your class, or pick out the salient points you want to cover yourself.
Directed Writing for IGCSE
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

Directed Writing for IGCSE

(0)
This complete scheme of work teaches students through: Lesson activities to develop the skills of reading and writing Examiners's advice as well as the criteria Links to demonstration videos Ways to improve spelling and punctuation Assessments Model answers of varying quality for students to assess and improve A teaching sequence to use and remember Rhetorical techniques A mnemonic to remember these techniques: AH!FASTERCROCH A PLC (Personal Learning Checklist)
How to Write a Description or Narrative as a Dramatic Monologue
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

How to Write a Description or Narrative as a Dramatic Monologue

(0)
What the resource includes: 13 Steps: Just tell me what to do. These steps will make sure any story or description is at least grade 7 Sample question What does the mark scheme say? Translated for students to understand. Model Answer, at under 600 words, possible for a student to write under exam conditions. The Importance of Planning the Ending - this is much easier than planning the whole story, especially under exam conditions. 11 things the model teaches, and that the examiner really wants Where do ideas come from? Guidance on how to get started. 3 great jokes
How to Write a Description or Narrative Using Childhood Memories
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

How to Write a Description or Narrative Using Childhood Memories

(0)
What the resource Includes: 5 Steps; Just tell me what to do. Model answer 444 words Model answer 550 words Model answer annotated for descriptive techniques What do I have to do to get 100%? How to be original: Breaking the Vase How to adapt the description to a series of photographs in the exam: Here’s how mine might start if the photograph were of a train. Or imagine it was the park. Or, the ultimate vase breaking, you can simply have it as the photo in the room. Imagine a photo of a road. What does the examiner really want? 21 ways to look at Descriptive Techniques and Interesting Writing (More Than Just SOAPAIMS)
Fully Understand Macbeth's Witches
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

Fully Understand Macbeth's Witches

(0)
The document contains every word spoken by the witches, or about them. Very useful for annotation. However, each page is highlighted with the most relevant quotations. The real merit of this resource is the video which goes with it. Students can take notes from this and consider; The context of Jacobean England. King James and his views on witchcraft. Shakespeare’s possible view of witchcraft. Shakespeare’s politics. The nature of the patriarchal society and Shakespeare’s possible views on this. How the witches mirror Lady Macbeth.
Paper2 Question 1 AQA Language
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

Paper2 Question 1 AQA Language

(0)
This resource includes a sample text, with a key for difficult vocabulary. It has a sample question and answers. It dovetails with the specimin paper you may have used as a mock, with different questions. The best way to use this is as part of the bundle on Paper 2, Questions 1-4! Here is the beginning. Question 1 Remember, you will get a 20th or 21st century text to go with your 19th century text in the exam. However, for copyright reasons, I will avoid a modern text. This does have the added benefit for you of getting familiar with the kind of convoluted sentences older texts use, so that you will be better prepared for the exam. Here is an example of a text from Dickens that is used in the specimen papers: Greenwich Fair: Where Dickens let his hair down Charles Dickens is writing in 1839 about a fair in London which was a popular annual event he enjoyed. The road to Greenwich during the whole of Easter Monday is in a state of perpetual bustle and noise. Cabs, hackney-coaches1, ‘shay’ carts2, coal-waggons, stages, omnibuses3, donkey- chaises2 - all crammed with people, roll along at their utmost speed. The dust flies in clouds, ginger-beer corks go off in volleys, the balcony of every public-house is crowded with people smoking and drinking, half the private houses are turned into tea-shops, fiddles are in great request, every little fruit-shop displays its stall of gilt gingerbread and penny toys; horses won’t go on, and wheels will come off. Ladies scream with fright at every fresh concussion and servants, who have got a holiday for the day, make the most of their time. Everybody is anxious to get on and to be at the fair, or in the park, as soon as possible. The chief place of resort in the daytime, after the public-houses, is the park, in which the principal amusement is to drag young ladies up the steep hill which leads to the Observatory4, and then drag them down again at the very top of their speed, greatly to the derangement of their curls and bonnet-caps, and much to the edification of lookers-on from below. ‘Kiss in the Ring5,’ and ‘Threading my Grandmother’s Needle5,’ too, are sports which receive their full share of patronage.
Older v Younger Generation: Grade 9 Essay Writing.
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

Older v Younger Generation: Grade 9 Essay Writing.

(0)
Teach your students how to use the indicative content to write their revision essay. Then show them how to refine this to a grade 9 essay which can be done under exam conditions. Next teach them from the model. Show exactly how it meets all the exam criteria for AQA and Edexcel. Here is an extract:
Examiner's Tips for Grades 7, 8 and 9 Romeo and Juliet
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

Examiner's Tips for Grades 7, 8 and 9 Romeo and Juliet

(0)
What does the examiner’s report have to tell us about teaching Romeo and Juliet? Learn how to write about more than one interpretation for the top grades. Take opposing views about the role of the Friar in bringing peace to Verona, but upsetting the social order. About Romeo and Juliet’s love representing the passion of the individual, or the error of challenging social conventions. Relate their marriage to the potential tragedy of Shakespeare’s marriage to Ann Hathaway. Or alternatively, understand the play as a celebration of his own marriage in contrast to social conventions of Verona and Shakespeare’s audience. Find alternative perspectives on the Nurse, so that she is both hero and villain. See how a contemporary audience might well have seen Capulet as a model father. Follow the link to my video to see how to use the presentation to teach your students.
Grade 9 Analysis of Charge of the Light Brigade
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

Grade 9 Analysis of Charge of the Light Brigade

(0)
Propel students to top grades in their full understanding of the context of this poem. It is propaganda, we know. But teaching the rhyme scheme and dactyl metre reveals a surprising alternative, that Tennyson is horrified at the senseless slaughter of the soldiers. Students who understand ‘form and structure’ achieve at least grade 7. A video also explains everything, so your students can follow up the lesson with homework, or can use it as flipped learning before you teach the poem.
7 Secrets to Describing Like Dickens
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

7 Secrets to Describing Like Dickens

(0)
This very focused PPT takes an extract from Bleak House to show you 7 secrets of Dickens' description, including how to use contrast, why metaphor and personification trump metaphor, the power of listing and the subtlety of alliterative sound and rhythm. When we look at marking criteria we tend to befuddle the students with lists of descriptive techniques. Notice that listing, rhythm and contrast probably don't make it onto most teachers' lists, but these are the most powerful ways of improving their description. The kind of all writing techniques, or indeed the queen, is the use of the right verb. Dickens masters that too. The resource will also be linked to a video you can use to teach this, or plan your teaching from. Also included is the extract from Bleak House in Word.
How to Write a Story Based on a Person You Know
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

How to Write a Story Based on a Person You Know

(0)
This resource teaches students how to take even ordinary people they know and shape a story round them. Teach 7 techniques which guarantee a good story. It shows them how to structure what they know so that it has a beginning, a middle and an end. It illustrates how to craft the ending with a twist. It provides the full short story, as well as questions to help students realise how it is put together, so that they can plan and write their own. The story is also provided in Word form, so you can adapt it for your class, or annotate it with them, or print it for them.
English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

English Language Paper 1, The Reading Paper, Q1-4

4 Resources
Quite simply, there is no more comprehensive guide to how to teach these 4 questions. It includes advice for students on each question, the mark schemes, sample questions, sample answers, plenty of fresh texts to practise on, a glossary of terms, how to move beyond PEE paragraphs and, if you are in the mood for more, over 30 English jokes. All in Word, for you to edit and reproduce as you please. And all for an unbelievably good price.
How to get 100% on Question 2 of Paper 1, especially in writing about sentence forms
theslightlyawesometeachertheslightlyawesometeacher

How to get 100% on Question 2 of Paper 1, especially in writing about sentence forms

(1)
This is a comprehensive resource to teach your students how to get 100% in all aspects of the question. It teaches 11 different skills for the question: 1.Highlight the key words in the question which tell you what to look for 2.Highlight the margin of the part of the text you are told to look at 3.Find quotations as you read 4.Name a descriptive or narrative technique for each quotation you use (These will always be about imagery – simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration – and then perhaps onomatopoeia, sibilance, synesthesia, assonance, pathetic fallacy) 5.Refer to individual words in the quotation 6.Name their parts of speech – verb, adverb, noun, adjective 7.Find a long complex sentence, especially one with listed descriptions 8.Comment on the effect of contrast or juxtaposition, which will be in any description 9.Relate these quotations to the writer’s purpose, to discuss their effects 10.Use tentative language, like ‘perhaps’ to suggest your interpretation of the effect or purpose 11.Do not write in PEE paragraphs, but sentences which include embedded quotations It contains several models of how to write about complex sentences, with several practice paragraphs from Kipling, Conrad and Dickens for your students to practise on. It shows students how to model their own writing on that of other writers, using Brighton Rock. Students get to see why knowing parts of speech is so important to developing their own skills as writers. This then makes the job of writing about the effect of language features so much more easy and explicit for them. If you want to try without buying, all the PowerPoint is covered in a video at Mr Salles Teaches English, which you can find here: http://bit.ly/Question2Paper1 This PowerPoint is taken directly from The Mr Salles Guide to 100% in AQA English Language GCSE, which you can sample here: http://amzn.to/2phxxaS