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The History Academy

Average Rating4.83
(based on 207 reviews)

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. I have personally spent over 27 years in the classroom and published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create your own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. I have personally spent over 27 years in the classroom and published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create your own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Card Sort: How did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?
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Card Sort: How did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?

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This outstanding resource has been designed for students studying the new GCSE syllabus on Weimar Germany 1918 - 1933. It focuses on the key reasons why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933. It can be used as a starter, consolidation exercise, plenary or even a homework activity. This activity is designed to appeal to students of all abilities and has a stretch and challenge question at the end which can be used either as a discussion point or as the focus for a written task. When you purchase this resource it includes a fully editable two page Microsoft Word document with a learning aim and three activities. It also includes eight heading cards labeled propaganda, election promises, wealthy backers, support, the depression, Weimar constitution, technology, Hitler’s image and eight matching statement cards which explain why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933. At the bottom of the page there is an extension question that provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have know by explaining the two main reason. Depending upon your photocopying budget, on page two I have included a third activity with matching images to go with each heading and explanation. When completed, this resource creates a useful revision guide which looks very impressive visually. Depending upon the ability of the class, it should take no more than 20 minutes to do the card sort. Afterwards they could have a go at doing an extended question answering the question: ‘Why did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?’ The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Rise of Hitler Know: What factors helped Hitler become Chancellor? Understand: What roles were played by economic, social and political factors in Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The key reasons why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933? Explain: What roles were played by political, social and economic factors in his appointment? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Battle of Britain, 1940
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The Battle of Britain, 1940

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This outstanding lesson on why the RAF won the Battle of Britain, was amongst one of our most popular downloads we had schoollhistory.co.uk and has been tried, tested and fine tuned over many years. This newer version has been fully updated with a wider range of tasks and activities to suit the modern classroom, but if you would still like to use the classic version, then I have also included it as a PDF file. These resources are suitable for the full ability range and include a wide range of differentiated activities. When you purchases these resources you will be able to download an eighteen slide PowerPoint to accompany the lesson and two different versions of a four page page worksheet. I have also included a numeracy activity that can be used in lesson or set as homework. The PowerPoint is designed to be used as a standalone resource or if you prefer to accompany the worksheet and contains the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, pictures diagrams, information and links to video clips, that you will need to teach the lesson. With the exception of the classic version, all the worksheets have been supplied in Microsoft Word. The lesson begins by looking at the military situation in 1940 and gets students to analyse why Germany decided to invade and the challenges that they would face trying to cross the English Channel. This is followed up by another activity which gets students to listen to Churchill’s famous ‘we will fight them on the beaches’ speech and to assess why it was made in Parliament and broadcast to the nation. The rest of lesson and activities focus on what happened and why the RAF won. For more information, please refer to the preview slides. The aims and objectives of the lesson are: Theme: The Second World War Know: Why did Germany try and invade Britain during the summer of 1940? Understand: Why did the RAF win the Battle of Britain? Evaluate: How important was the role of technology in the German defeat? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why Germany tried to invade Britain in 1940? Explain: Why the RAF won the Battle of Britain? Analyse: How important was the role of technology in the German defeat? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. It has also been bundled up along with my lessons on Blitzkrieg and Dunkirk. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal.
Card Sort: Impact of the Treaty of Versailles on Germany
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Card Sort: Impact of the Treaty of Versailles on Germany

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This outstanding resource has been written by experienced history teachers to help students studying understand the political, economic, military and territorial impact of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919. It can be used as a revision activity, starter or plenary and should easily work alongside any main stream resource on this topic. If you are looking for a resource that provides more challenge or promotes more discussion, then check out my diamond resource on why the Germans hated the Treaty of Versailles. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a full editable Microsoft word document which contains a lesson objective, instructions, four heading cards and 16 cards on the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919. Once students have cut out and matched the cards, they can extend their learning by trying to explain which of the terms Germany would have found the most humiliating. When you download the PowerPoint which has been designed to accompany this resource, it contains information slides, maps, diagrams, tasks and activities to help support the main card sort activity, The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Treaty of Versailles Know: What were the terms of the Treaty of Versailles? Understand: What were the economic, political, territorial and military consequences for Germany? Evaluate: which of the terms would most Germans have found the most humiliating? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919? Explain: The economic, political, territorial and military consequences of the treaty for Germany? Analyse: Which consequences or terms were the most humiliating for Germany? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900: Birth of the Railways
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Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900: Birth of the Railways

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These are outstanding resources which I have used many times over the past 25 years in one shape or another during lesson observations with Ofsted and or LEA advisors. They form part of a series that I have uploaded to the TES on the Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900. These particular resources focus on the birth of the railways up to the period known as 'Railway Mania' in the 1850s. The PowerPoint is designed to work alongside the worksheet, but it can be used as an independent resource on a school VLE or in a lesson. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, starters and three activities that are accessible to a wide spectrum of learners. These activities include a snowballing starter of the key words, a heads and tails activity as well as a thinking skills review triangle activity on what were the most important steps / inventions to the birth of the railways. The worksheet includes similar activities, but also includes several much harder questions to help extend middle and higher ability students. The PowerPoint also contains a number of linked in video clips and animated steam engines. I would like to add that I am not a train spotter, but I've always found that my students, especially the boys have thoroughly enjoyed this topic so put the fun back into the industrial revolution by looking a few machines rather than just focusing on social history. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: Why were the important steps to the introduction of the steam locomotive? Understand: What were the causes of ‘Railway Mania’? Evaluate: Why did the railways rapidly grow from 1830 – 1900? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Significance and Source Analysis WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key inventions that were necessary for the invention of the locomotive? Explain: What was ‘Railway Mania’? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which factor to the introduction of the railways? Anyway, have fun with these resources. They are full editable. If you like them, then please check out some of my other resources on the building of the railway and their impact of the economy. Kind Regards Roy
Hadrian's Wall
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Hadrian's Wall

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This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you have purchased this resource in the past, I have recently uploaded a new PowerPoint to accompany the main worksheet. Both resources include information, historical sources, tasks and activities. However, the PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims of the first lesson are: Know: How Hadrian’s Wall was built and designed? Understand: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Hadrian Wall’s defences? Can You Explain: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Whilst the aims of the much shorter second lesson, which could be set as a homework are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Understand: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Explain: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Can You Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Life in the Trenches
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Life in the Trenches

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This is great lesson get your students talking for weeks and doing extra homework projects. This beautifully illustrated resource is designed to help students assess what life in the trenches was like for soldiers in the First World War as well as what the greatest daily dangers or challenges. As you can see from the preview slides, the tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability. This resource is designed to be a standalone lesson, but it can be also used alongside any mainstream text book on this topic. I usually project the slides, tasks and activities on the board, but some of activities can also be printed off and placed around the tables in the classroom. The resource is full editable so you can easily sequence the lesson to suit your students and the context of your school. I usually supplement this resource with relevant clips from Your Tube from films like ‘All Quiet on the Western Front’, ‘War Horse’ and ‘Gallipoli.’ When you purchase this resource you will receive a twenty three slide PowerPoint which includes an optional ‘snowballing’ or a ‘buzz and go starter’. The next section of the PP then includes information slides and activities on life in the trenches including sleeping accommodation, food, mud, trench foot, health and hygiene, body lice, enemy action, shell shock. These are then followed up by a series of consolidation exercises culminating in a thinking skills review triangle. I have also included relevant questions and addition slides with useful templates to use alongside this resource. For more information, please see the preview sample. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows: Theme: The First World War Know: What was everyday life like for the soldiers in the trenches? Understand: How did they overcome their daily problems? Evaluate: How reliable are the official images of life in the trenches? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How did soldiers cope with everyday life in the trenches? Explain: How did the overcome their daily problems? Analyse: How reliable are the official images of like in the trenches? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on the First World War in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?
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Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. The women’s movement was split between the peaceful suffragists on the one hand, who made up nearly 80% of women, whilst on the other there were the better known militant suffragettes. The lesson resources have been designed to suit the full spectrum of ability at KS3 and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. However, I have also included a PowerPoint to accompany the lesson which includes all the necessary background knowledge for the lesson. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document an an accompanying PowerPoint presentation. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Suffragette’ and ‘Suffragist’, along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. Whilst the PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, links to appropriate video clips and additional tasks, including an alternative Venn diagram activity comparing the two groups of campaigners. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. If you are interested you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
What problems faced James I when he became King of England in 1603?
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What problems faced James I when he became King of England in 1603?

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the problems facing James I when he became King of England in 1603? Students are presented with a number of challenges facing James I including religious, financial, foreign relations, the growth of Parliament and his beliefs in the Divine Rights of Kings. Once they have reviewed these problems, students are then asked to produce a speech suggesting how he could solve them, which can be peer and self reviewed using the resources included in the PowerPoint. Finally, they can then complete a quick heads and tails activity matching the action that James I took to solve his problems and then assess how successful they were. This brilliant lesson also helps to set the scene for the Gunpowder Plot and for the long term causes of the English Civil War. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint presentation that includes everything that you will need for this lesson. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, consolidation exercises, information slides and links to video clips. The PowerPoint also includes two beautifully presented diagrams summarising James I’s problems for higher and lower ability students, which can be easily printed off and used with students as a classification exercise. I have also included various other alternative activities, depending upon your photocopying budget including a speech and thinking skills review exercise to help students decide which problems were the most important. The resource also includes a heads and tails activity which can also be printed off or copied by students off the board. I have included screen shots of all the slides in the preview slides. Everything has been carefully differentiated and can be easily adapted for the full range of ability. This is one of my favourite lessons and there is enough to last a class 2/3 lessons can be used to make you sparkle and shine for Ofsted or an observation lesson. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Invaders and Settlers: The Anglo Saxons
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Invaders and Settlers: The Anglo Saxons

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This lesson is designed as an KS3 introductory module called ‘Invaders and Settlers AD43 - 1066’. It provides a detailed overview of the impact of the Saxon invasion of Britain and addresses key questions such as how do historians find out about the past, where the Saxons invaders or settlers and how multicultural was British society at this time? There is also a focus on the decline and rise again of towns, which is a theme which is returned to in other KS3 modules on medieval towns and industrialisation 1750 - 1900. The tasks and activities included in this module are suitable for the full range of ability at KS3 and are designed as a bridge or transition from KS2. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why was England invaded and settled from 40AD to 1066? Know: How do modern historians find out about the past? Understand: Who were the Anglo Saxons and why did they come to Britain? Evaluate: Were the Anglo Saxons invaders or settlers? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How do historians find out about the past? Explain: Who were the Anglo Saxons and why did they come to Britain? Analyse: Were the Anglo Saxons invaders or settlers? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a twenty eight PowerPoint Presentation which includes starters, plenaries and a range of interactive resources and activities. These include a snowballing stater, buzz , information slides, tasks, activities and video clips on whether the Anglo-Saxons were invaders and settlers and a Venn diagram activity on how did towns change after the Romans left Britain. This is then followed up a series of video task activities which focus on the impact of the Anglo-Saxon’s on Britain, were they invaders or settlers and how do historians find out about the past. I have included summary tables and alternative tasks for this information which you can chose from. Everything you need to photocopy is include in the PP, the relevant video clip has been hyperlinked to my You Tube channel and is also included in the preview which accompanies this resource. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Peasant's Revolt
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The Peasant's Revolt

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These beautifully designed resources have been written for the full spectrum of learners who are studying the Peasants Revolt. They cover the causes of the peasants revolt, the revolt itself, the controversy over what happened when Watt Tyler met the King and the aftermath. Ideally, these resources could be used over 2/ 3 lessons with a middle ability Year 7 class. When you purchase this resource, you will receive three PowerPoints and additional supporting worksheets, which have been tweaked for photocopying. These resources include aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides as well as a range of activities including starters and plenaries that can be easily customised for your learners. I have also included, at no extra cost two additional card sorts on the causes and the consequences of the Peasant's Revolt as well as an alternative cartoon strip. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Source Analysis: Henry VIII's Personality
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Source Analysis: Henry VIII's Personality

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This great resources has never failed in 24 years to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning. All my colleagues have routinely used as it is a popular resource, especially when used along side a few video clips about Henry. For example, the opening scene from the film 'a Man for all Seasons', when Henry VIII arrives at the home of Sir Thomas Moore and jumps into the mud! The resource contains five primary sources and one secondary. The task and activities are designed to get students to explore these sources and try and describe what sort of man Henry VIII was and how his personality changed over time. It is always worthwhile pointing out that after Henry VIII's jousting accident, his leg was pretty painful with the ulcers he developed and this would have had a significant impact on his personality. The activities also try to get students to understand that what commentators said both at the time and after his death, may have had an impact on how favourably they described him. I have also added a PowerPoint to work alongside this resource with all the relevant video clips linked into the slides. I have also included additional activities to suit the full range of learners. Anyway, have fun with this resource, I have also uploaded a writing frame which can be used alongside the homework activity to help students structure their letter to the King of France. Theme: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome? Know: What sort of man was Henry VIII? Understand: How did Henry VIII's personality change over time? Evaluate: How reliable are the sources describing Henry VIII? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What can we learn from the sources about Henry VIII? Explain: How have the descriptions of his personality changed over time? Analyse: Begin to form a judgement on why some sources are more reliable than others. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy PS If you like this resource, why not check out my Dingbat Card game on Henry VIII?
Why did the Roman Empire collapse?
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Why did the Roman Empire collapse?

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This outstanding lesson has been refined and field tested by experienced teachers. It is designed to help students assess which factors played a crucial role in the collapse of the Roman Empire. This resource is suitable for the full ability range and is a great way of rounding of a course with a fun and engaging activity which can be used as the focus for an assessment or extended piece of writing. The lesson opens with either a snowballing or buzz and go starter. It then sets the scene for the decline of the Empire and looks at the roles played by internal civil wars, climate change, inflation, declining population, the Roman Army and the Barbarian invasions, in it’s final collapse. This is then followed up with a card sort activity and a possible thinking skills review triangle which can then be used by students to help write an extended piece of writing. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page word document and as well as a thirteen slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions, six heading cards and fourteen statements that can be sorted under them as part of the main activity. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, information slides, historical sources to support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview that I have uploaded. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: Why factors caused the collapse of the Roman Empire? Understand: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Empire? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Change & Continuity, Source Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The different factors which caused the collapse of the Empire Explain: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Roman Empire? Analyse: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Medieval Medicine - Change and Continuity
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Medieval Medicine - Change and Continuity

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The great resource deals with the tricky topic change and continuity in Medieval Medicine in Britain. The resource includes a PowerPoint with all the resources and worksheets that are required for the lesson as well as a recent lesson plan I wrote to help teach this topic with this resource. The PowerPoint includes: Aims & Objectives A starter + a differentiated version Information Slides Source analysis activity A card sort / activity on change and continuity An extended question which has been differentiated to include a slide to help structure responses Peer and self analysis feedback sheets. Blank templates for the activities. The aims and activities are: • Theme: Medicine in Britain, 1250 – present • Know: What were the key features medieval medicine? • Understand: Which key features of ancient medicine were still being used in medieval times? • Evaluate: How far did ancient ideas about medicine continued to be used in the medieval period? • Skills: Change and Continuity Learning Outcomes • Levels 1 – 4 = Identify & describe: What changed and what stayed the same? • Levels 5 – 7 = Explain: What had changed and what had stayed the same? • Levels 7 – 8 = Analyse: How far did medical ideas changed during the medieval period?
Card Sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves
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Card Sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves

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This activity has been carefully designed to help students assess understand the differences between constructive and destructive waves and be used along side any main stream textbook or video. Once complete students should be able to attempt a question on ‘compare the characteristics of constructive and destructive waves.’ When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Constructive’ and ‘Destructive’ waves as well as fourteen information cards and two diagrams that be sorted under them. This resource makes a great starter or plenary to be completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up by the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Alternatively, your students could draw a table with the two headings ‘Constructive’ or ‘Destructive’ and copy out the information under them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Coastal Landscapes Know: What is a ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ wave? Understand: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Evaluate: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The main characteristics of ‘constructive’ and ‘destrictive’ waves? Explain: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Analyse: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow us on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did the Normans build Square Keep Castles?
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Why did the Normans build Square Keep Castles?

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This lesson has been carefully crafted and refined to help students understand why the Normans built Square Keep Castles after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. It also looks at their key features, military strengths, weaknesses and gets students to compare them to Motte & Bailey Castles. This lesson could be used as part a unit of work on medieval castles or as part of the theme on how did William keep control. If you are interested in delving deeper into this topic, then this lesson can be purchased as bundled discount along with lessons on medieval castles from my TES shop. When you purchase these resources you will be able to download a worksheet and an accompanying PowerPoint. The worksheet includes two pages of information and sources as well as a third activities page with two different options of tasks for low or higher ability students. The twenty slide PowerPoint includes a ‘snowballing’ and a ‘buzz and go starter’ as well information slides, historical sources, pictures, diagrams, tasks and activities to support the lesson. The PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, graphic organisers, thinking skill templates and a plenary. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows: Theme: How did William keep control? Know: What were the main features of a Square Keep castle? Understand: Why did the Normans build Square Keep Castles? Evaluate: What were the military strengths and weaknesses of a SQ Castle? Skills: Cause and Consequence, Source Analysis WILF: What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify and Describe: The key features of a Square Keep Castle Explain: Why did the Normans build Square Keep Castles? Analyse: What were the main military strengths of a Square Keep Castle? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on the First World War in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Opposition to the New Deal 1933 - 1941
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Card Sort: Opposition to the New Deal 1933 - 1941

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This outstanding resources is designed to help students understand why different groups opposed the New Deal 1933 - 1941. It can be used as a starter or a plenary activity and should fit around any standard text book or resource on this topic. The card sort includes eight heading cards that can be matched to twelve statement cards. I have deliberately included some extra cards to add some challenge for the more able. Once the cards have been sorted, the second task asks students to create a key to help them decide which statements believed that the New Deal did too much or too little to help the American people. This resource is supplied in Microsoft Word so you can further differentiate this resource for your students if you wish. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The New Deal 1933 - 1941 Know: Which groups / individuals opposed the New Deal? Understand: Why was each group / individual opposed to the New Deal? Evaluate: How successful was the New Deal? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe = Who opposed the New Deal? Explain: Why did different groups oppose the New Deal? Analyse: Begin to form a judgement on how successful was the New Deal? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Home Front, 1939 -1945
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The Home Front, 1939 -1945

7 Resources
These outstanding resources have been designed to help students studying the Home Front during the Second World War. They are suitable for the full range of ability and should take between 9 to 10 hours of curriculum time to complete. Each lesson comes with a fully editable worksheet and PowerPoint, which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, tasks, activities, links to video clips, thinking skills and active learning exercises. These resources have been repeatedly tested on the front line in the classroom and have been improved based upon best practice over 26 years. For more information, please click on each resource. You can purchase them individually, but by buying them as a bundle you will have over 29%.
Oracy - Speaking Starters
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Oracy - Speaking Starters

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This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy
Speaking Frame for cause and effect
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Speaking Frame for cause and effect

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This fantastic little speaking frame is great for getting students to explain the cause and effect. It could be used in many different subjects from a history to science. Like all the resources in this series, its great strength is its simplicity. Please check out some of my other resources. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Humanities Literacy Mat
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Humanities Literacy Mat

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This literacy mat can be printed off back to back in A3 colour and laminated to use with your students in lesson to help them structure their work using the correct sentence starters and connectives. The literacy mat also includes guidance on spelling, punctuation, structuring paragraphs using PEE and PEEL as well as the correct then, their and they're. This is a must have resource for any humanities teacher.