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The Development of Entertainment and Changing Culture of the 1930's

The Development of Entertainment and Changing Culture of the 1930's

AQA GCSE History: America, 1920–1973 - Opportunity and Inequality Describe key features of popular culture in the 1930’s. Explain how and why popular culture was an important part of people’s live in the 1930’s. Lesson Objective: to what extent did popular culture become a vital part of American identity in the 1930’s?

By liam0001

Civil Rights Who contributed the most to Civil Rights, Kennedy or Johnson?

Civil Rights Who contributed the most to Civil Rights, Kennedy or Johnson?

Who contributed the most to Civil Rights, Kennedy or Johnson? LO: To explain the contribution of JFK and LBJ to African American Civil Rights. LO: To build an argument using evidence to argue for which President contributed the most to Civil Rights. Know the role of Kennedy and Johnson for Civil Rights. Be able to explain and compare the actions of both Presidents on Civil Rights of African Americans. Begin to consider and make a judgement of which President had more of a beneficial role for Civil Rights within the framework of different factors.

By W17

Millionaire Quiz! (Edwardian Edition)

Millionaire Quiz! (Edwardian Edition)

High-quality gameshow about the Edwardians, featuring sound effects and background music. This fully interactive high-quality gameshow features all the exciting sounds, background music and drama of the TV show. Each possible answer is linked to either a pass or fail screen indicating the amount of money ‘won’. A free trial of my best-in-class version is available here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/millionaire-quiz-free-trial-edition-11697409 There are 15 questions, testing children's knowledge of: - Edwardian Monarchs - Sport - Politics - Important historical events - Art - and more! Please see my shop for other gameshows, worksheets, activities and time-saving ideas. All feedback is welcome so please do comment and rate. N.B The original logos for Who Wants to be a Millionaire are property of Sony Pictures Television. For this reason they have not been included, but a similar non-trademarked version has.

By GalvaniseEDU

Nelson Mandela Activity Pack

Nelson Mandela Activity Pack

1. Nelson Mandela History and Quiz Plus coloring sheets and brilliant video link. Learning Objectives: To be able to explain about the History of Nelson Mandela This works brilliantly for expanding vocabulary and creative thinking skills. 32 questions within 60 slides; excellent pictures and sources to engage and motivate pupils study. Teacher Notes This is an excellent activity/game/plenary to further improve student’s work and knowledge. I split the class into two teams (in one class I have girls against boys but in another class I have just divided the room down the middle) and when we play the game each side decides on a volunteer to come to the front, facing the class so they can’t see the board (one team at a time). A word is shown on the IWB and each time the word is answered correctly I display another. This works really well but it is important to set some ground rules such as not using words that rhyme with the word on display. I’ve yet to come across a class who doesn’t like the concept. Works brilliantly in pairs also - 1 student turns their back to the IWB. Further Notes Student sits at front with back to board. Words are displayed behind him/her. Rest of class has to describe word to student - see how many he/she gets in 1 min. Can be reversed so that student can see the words and has to describe them to the class. 2. Nelson Mandela Handout 3. NM crossword 4. NM Word Search 5. Solve the message puzzle from NM

By sfy773

British History Millionaire Quiz Bundle

British History Millionaire Quiz Bundle

Ten fully interactive Millionaire Quiz games for the Roman Britain, Viking, Saxon, Norman, Plantagenet, Tudor, Stuart, Georgian, Edwardian and Victorian eras of British history. 43 AD-1914 AD covered in one bundle! All feature background music, sound effects and fail screens. Tried and tested. There are video previews of each quiz on their individual pages.

By GalvaniseEDU

Marnti Warrajanga – A walk together

Marnti Warrajanga – A walk together

Explore milestones of the Indigenous journey of democracy in Australia and consider their relevance to today. The information and activities support the online exhibition - www.marnti-warajanga.moadoph.gov.au/ This resource contains background information, discussion questions and class activities to enhance student learning and engagement with the Marnti warajanga – a walk together exhibition. Deceased person’s warning: Please note: Indigenous Australians are advised that this exhibition may contain images and voices of deceased persons.

By MoADLearning

Diamond 9: Why did some women get the vote in 1900?

Diamond 9: Why did some women get the vote in 1900?

This great diamond 9 activity has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It has been designed to be used with the full spectrum of leaners, but is particularly useful for stretching the critical thinking skills of the more able. If you are looking for a main stream resource, then please check out my card sort on this topic, which can be found in my TES shop. However, If you wish, you can also purchase both resources along with a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, starter, assessment and pupil mark scheme for an extra £1 , under the title: 'Why did some women get the vote in 1918?' When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document which can be differentiated further if you wish. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include one of the reasons why some women got the vote in 1918. Once students have cut the cards out, they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Sort the remaining diamonds to show which are ‘short’ or ‘long’ term consequences. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons why some women got the vote in 1918 and explain your reasons. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explain Once students have sorted the cards, you can extend their understanding further by discussing which factor played the most important role in persuading politicians to change their mind and give some women the vote in 1918. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Card Sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

Card Sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability a s a starter or plenary. If you wish, you can purchase this resource with a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, starter, assessment and pupil mark scheme for an extra £1 , under the title: 'Why did some women get the vote in 1918?' I've also thrown in my diamond 9 activity on this topic, which can be used for additional differentiation for your higher ability students. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics' as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. Once students have sorted the cards, you can extend their understanding further by discussing which factor played the most important role in persuading politicians to change their mind and give some women the vote in 1918. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins