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Campaign - Make An Impact

Campaign - Make An Impact

The Campaign! Make an Impact model follows a simple three step plan. The process engages young people with inspiring campaigns from the past, provides examples of campaign strategies and supports active involvement in planning and delivering their own campaign. The Tolpuddle Martyrs, Clerkenwell Fund, Bryant and May Strike and Mumia Abu-Jamal cover nearly two hundred years of campaign history. They are linked because of the way in which ordinary people have gathered to a cause born out of social injustice. Determination, resolute purpose and courage to stand against what seems like overwhelming opposition mark these campaigns out. The resources, drawn from archive material about each event, provide starting points to help young people gain insights into historical campaigns and to be inspired to create a campaign of their own.
versym
Peace and Conflict Scheme of Work

Peace and Conflict Scheme of Work

A scheme of work which covers the causes of war, how it is justified politically and religiously, nuclear war, pacifism, north korea, 9.11 and terrorism, with an opportunity for an creative and analytical assessment. I've tweaked, modified and re-vamped these resources to maximise engagement and learning for 2018.
DavidFew
The United Nations

The United Nations

A lesson to explore the UN and what it does. This lesson aims to give students an understanding of the organisation and the means to question if it is a reasonable use of resources, or a waste of them. Class debates included, as usual, with extension activities, youtube videos, and plenty of varied activities to bolster engagement. A SEND worksheet also attached here. Learning Questions What is the United Nations? What are its aims? Do you think it’s a good organisation?
DavidFew
The Just War Theory

The Just War Theory

A lesson designed to explore the Just War Theory in a collaborative, group work activity that emphasizes team work. This leads on to a creative activity where students create a poster, poem or rap to exemplify the Just War Theory’s 7 aspects. Learning Questions include: What is the Just War Theory? Do I agree with it? Why? Differentiated learning outcomes included, which evaluate why Christians may or may not agree with the Just War Theory. All activities are clearly explained in the Powerpoint, and a variety of extension activities for more able students are included.
DavidFew
The Investigatory Powers Act

The Investigatory Powers Act

Perfect for a form discussion or a PHSE/Citizenship lesson, this resource examines the investigatory powers act and gives students the opportunity to debate their opinions on mass surveillance. It also summarises human rights, and is designed to help develop students skills of critical thought and debate. It includes a short youtube video and SMSC objectives. Learning Questions include: What is the investigatory powers act? Should the government be able to see all of our online data? SMSC objectives met are: To learn and discuss what is right and wrong and respect the law; investigate moral and ethical issues and offer reasoned views. To appreciate diverse viewpoints and resolve conflict.
DavidFew
Money, Debt and inequality

Money, Debt and inequality

When I ask my students: ‘What is money?’, they hardly ever know. Most adults don’t either. This lesson looks at what money is, how the banking crisis happened, what the difference between good debt and bad debt is, and the current global inequality in wealth. It includes individual and group work activities, as well as whole class discussions, to try and stimulate students understanding and critical engagement with the world as it is. A lesson that could work as an introduction for economics, PHSE, SEAL, SMSC and Careers lessons for children aged 11+. Extensions, start and plenary are included to aid differentiation and the learning journey. Learning questions also increase in difficulty as the lesson progresses. Learning questions include: What is money? What’s the difference between good debt and bad debt? What is crypto-currency? Extension: Is financial inequality out of control, and if so how can it be resolved? Instructions on how to use the resource are in the notes of the powerpoint, which also includes a number of youtube videos, and included here is also a short word document which has some of the debate about where money originated from and what preceded it. This document is made from a summary of Graeber’s recent work and watching the ‘crash course’ video on money. Adam Smith’s idea that barter preceded minted coinage seems, in recent academia, to be incorrect. Rather, minted metal coinage seems to have been part of a ‘military-mining-slavery complex’ where wars created slaves to mine metal to pay soldiers.
DavidFew
KS3 History Mega Bundle

KS3 History Mega Bundle

20 x fully resourced lesson packs - all complete with differentiated powerpoints and worksheets, clip links, starters, plenaries, LOs to three levels throughout. Designed to meet Ofsted Good-Outstanding criteria by a experienced History teacher in a UK secondary school. All lessons have been highly-rated by Tes users. This pack is created by EC Resources, the most popular Tes Resources author of last year.
History_Geek
Year 8 History

Year 8 History

14x fully resourced lesson packs - all complete with differentiated powerpoints and worksheets, clip links, starters, plenaries, LOs to three levels throughout. Designed to meet Ofsted Good-Outstanding criteria by a experienced History teacher in a UK secondary school. All lessons have been highly-rated by Tes users. Suitable for KS3 and easy to adapt. I'm going to keep adding to this, so if you buy it check your downloads now and again as I'll have added something new :)
History_Geek
Year 7 History

Year 7 History

9x fully resourced lesson packs - all complete with differentiated powerpoints and worksheets, clip links, starters, plenaries, LOs to three levels throughout. Designed to meet Ofsted Good-Outstanding criteria by a experienced History teacher in a UK secondary school. All lessons have been highly-rated by Tes users. Suitable for KS3 and easy to adapt. I'm going to keep adding to this, so if you buy it check your downloads now and again as I'll have added something new :)
History_Geek
**New WJEC Geography A-level mapping resource for Unit 2, Section A and B – Changing Places**

**New WJEC Geography A-level mapping resource for Unit 2, Section A and B – Changing Places**

Placemaking resource for teaching the new WJEC A-level Geography Specification, Unit 2, Section A and B – Changing Places, for the post 2016 specification. The mapping document links each of the following headings to resources from the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI): • 2.1.1. and 2.1.2: Relationships and Connections, Meanings and Representation. • 2.1.3: Changes in economic characteristics over time. • 2.1.4: Social inequalities in de-industrialised urban places. • 2.1.5 and 2.1.6: The tertiary and knowledge economies. • 2.1.7 and 2.1.8: The rebranding process and rural management. • 2.1.9 and 2.1.10: The rebranding process and urban management This resource could act as model for students on how to research and write a report, used as a secondary data set for when teaching the new Non Exam Assessment (NEA) and for student use when revising exams. Visit our webpages to learn more about the Royal Town Planning Institute and our RTPI Ambassadors and Resources available to you. N.B Please note this document has been approved for use by the WJEC A-level Geography examination body.
rtpi_education
**New Edexcel Geography A-level mapping resource for Topic 4A and Topic 4B**

**New Edexcel Geography A-level mapping resource for Topic 4A and Topic 4B**

Placemaking resource for teaching the new Edexcel A-level Geography Specification, Topic 4A Regenerating Places and Topic 4B Diverse Places for the post 2016 specification. The mapping document links each of the following headings to resources from the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI): Topic 4A: 1. How and why do places vary? 2. Why might regeneration be needed? 3. How is regeneration managed? 4. How successful is regeneration? Topic 4B: 1. How do population structures vary? 2. How do different people view diverse living spaces? 3. Why are there demographic and cultural tensions in diverse places? 4. How successfully are cultural and demographic issues managed? This resource could act as model for students on how to research and write a report, used as a secondary data set for when teaching the new Non Exam Assessment (NEA) and for student use when revising exams. Visit our webpages to learn more about the Royal Town Planning Institute and our RTPI Ambassadors and Resources available to you : http://www.rtpi.org.uk/education-and-careers/engagement-and-outreach/. N.B Please note this document has been approved for use by the Edexcel A-level Geography examination body.
rtpi_education