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Computing Skills Progression Y1-Y6

Computing Skills Progression Y1-Y6

Great for subject coordinators or to see progression in mixed year groups. Also good to plan lessons, especially if you have those who are less able. 7 word documents showing progression in: Programming Digital Exploration Communicate and Collaborate Multimedia Digital Media Music and Sound Data
orangedaisy86
Computing Design/Algorithm pro-formas (PDF and editable Word docx)

Computing Design/Algorithm pro-formas (PDF and editable Word docx)

As described in my “Delve in, for twelve min!” video CPD, these are example pro-formas to give pupils to design their computing projects. These could be Scratch projects; animations, games, quizzes etc. The design process, which is largely missed in computing, forms an essential part of a coding project, and also provides many benefits in terms of AFL. Please use in conjunction with the training video, and also check out the entire “Delve in, for twelve min!” series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3kA-gpaSB2a6Vfdq04rGt5xcKQg8FG8x
PhilWickins
Complete IGCSE ICT 0417 teaching and learning resources / Grade 9-10 / Year 10-11

Complete IGCSE ICT 0417 teaching and learning resources / Grade 9-10 / Year 10-11

Hi ICT teachers, I have created this resource bundle with teaching resources that will last for two academic years. You can view details of all of them individually. I am sure you will find these very useful not only for conducting ICT lessons, but also managing the ICT department in your school. NOTE: Please make sure to download this resource immediately upon payment. You can send me a private message or contact me on my site for any further FAQs.
zsirajdin
Scratch - Catch the Dot - A Simple Game Exercise

Scratch - Catch the Dot - A Simple Game Exercise

This is a simple worksheet that walks you through setting up a simple game called Catch the Dot. It’s similar to the Whack-a-Mole games where users try to hit a moving target. The use of variables are introduced to allow for score keeping and there are suggestions at the end to help improve the game.
firstcoding
Coding, Collaboration, Communication and Curriculum in Finland

Coding, Collaboration, Communication and Curriculum in Finland

Computer science nurtures problem-solving skills, logic and creativity. The world is increasingly run by software and we need more diversity among those people who are building it. Not all students will be software developers or writers, doctors or translators, but we are already surrounded by technology and even more so in the future. The main point is to provide a basic understanding of society, living environment and fields of science and thus provide equal opportunities for all the learners. Understanding how computers work and how to use them well, gives children skills and knowledge to succeed in global competition and life generally. Year 3 pupils were not only taught the basics of coding, but they were taught to teach other classes the magic of coding. They have taught around 200 other children and teachers in Finland and India (via video) the Magic of Coding. You can learn more about the Coding Ambassadors here or email for an online course including videos and lesson plan for collaborative coding lessons.
pipsa37
Crack the Binary Code – February Message (CS Unplugged)

Crack the Binary Code – February Message (CS Unplugged)

Teach your students how to encrypt and decrypt binary messages as well as understand binary code. This resource includes a hidden February themed message which students need to decrypt using the key (ASCII Table). Students are also given the option to write their own encrypted binary message. This is a perfect CS unplugged activity and can be used as an introduction to a lesson, for homework, for early finishers or even when you have no access to computers in the computer lab.
balsamgr8
Python Programming - I CAN Statements

Python Programming - I CAN Statements

These I Can statements are perfect to guide your students to develop the necessary skills when learning to code/program using Python. The teacher or the student can tick off each I Can statement once they have demonstrated evidence for them. I Can statements fall under the following 4 categories: • Criteria 1: Planning • Criteria 2: Skills Development • Criteria 3: Explanation of Code • Criteria 4: Efficiency of Code
balsamgr8
Python Programming–Jumbled Code Task Cards (Beginner) Coding Unplugged Activity

Python Programming–Jumbled Code Task Cards (Beginner) Coding Unplugged Activity

This resource is a brilliant way to get students to begin coding in Python! A set of 12 different Jumbled Code Python Task Cards which can be cut out, laminated and distributed to students. Instructions: Students need to look at the code and read the English statements (pseudo code) in order to put the jumbled python code in the correct order. These have been brilliant in my classroom and I have used them for starter and review activities. I have even used these as an introduction to coding in Python. These task cards also test students understanding of the following programming concepts: 1) syntax errors 2) logical errors 3) variables 4) print() function 5) input() function 6) int() function 6) if statements 7) while loops 8) lists 9) sorting & reverse sorting data in lists. Each task card also allows you to question students further on their knowledge of Python i.e: • “why was the data type string and not integer?” • “what is the difference between the input() and print() functions?” • “why did we need to use the int() function?E • Etc… Python software can be downloaded for free from: https://www.python.org/downloads/ There are also many online platforms in which Python can be used such as codeacademy.com
balsamgr8