CONSERVATION IN AUSTRALIA'S LIMMEN BIGHT MARINE PARK - DUGONGS AND GREEN TURTLES

CONSERVATION IN AUSTRALIA'S LIMMEN BIGHT MARINE PARK - DUGONGS AND GREEN TURTLES

The coincidence of major fishing grounds with the feeding grounds of the dugong and the nesting grounds of the green turtle provided challenges for the creation of the Limmen Bight Marine Park. The purpose of the Park was to protect and conserve the natural elements of the ecosystem. Another concern was to accommodate if possible the concerns and interests of others who had an interest in the attractions of the Marine Park area. This study has a focus on fishing - both recreational and commercial. The major sea grass meadows - the main source of food for the dugong - lie within the proclaimed area of the Marine Park. Along the shoreline the sandy/muddy beaches are a nesting ground for the returning green turtle. Globally the green turtle, once plentiful, has suffered significant population decline. The Limmen Bight area is a major egg laying area for the turtle. As a consequence this area is a focus of efforts to protect and conserve numbers. Australia has joined the world wide programme. By map, photograph, graph and description you can take your students to Limmen - a very recent Marine National Park and see why these two animals in particular are in need of protection. The attachment sheet provide opportunity for discussion and completion.
KPolkinghorne
LAND RIGHTS ISSUES FOR THE MARRA ABORIGINAL PEOPLE

LAND RIGHTS ISSUES FOR THE MARRA ABORIGINAL PEOPLE

This unit has a focus on the Land Rights of the Marra Aboriginal people. After deliberations lasting almost two decades the Government of the Northern Territory Proclaimed the Limmen National Park and the adjacent Limmen Bight Marine Park. Interested parties were invited to have an input on what the Parks would allow and disallow. As traditional occupiers of the designated region the Marra people were keen to have an input. This interest heightened when the mining operation within the Park boundaries indicated a projected development in the form of a pipeline that would carry iron ore sludge from the mine across traditional Marra land; across the shallow waters of the Limmen Bight and onto Maria Island in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Maria Island was of particular interest to the Marra people. Consequently the Marra Aboriginal people prepared and forwarded Petition to the Northern Territory outlining their objections to the proposed pipeline. This unit is about what happened. It is about land rights of the Marra who, through generations, had been impacted by European presnce on the lands they regarded as their traditional lands. Students can gain some insight into the Marra respect for land and the need to protect its resources. The Petition is provided for screen use and is also contained in the attachments. Tke your students into the remote region of the Limmen National Park and the shallows seas of the Limmen Bight Marine Park. Have them consider the thinking behind the final Proclamation of the Parks which are shown in the map. There are other units on this area if you wish to broaden the study.
KPolkinghorne
THE EPIC 1844-45 EXPLORATION EXPEDITION OF LUDWIG LEICHHARDT ACROSS THE AUSTRALIAN SAVANNA

THE EPIC 1844-45 EXPLORATION EXPEDITION OF LUDWIG LEICHHARDT ACROSS THE AUSTRALIAN SAVANNA

The German explorer Ludwig Leichhardt joins the group of European explorers who made long and arduous journeys across the “Great unknown” interior. Well - unknown to Europeans and colonists with settlements along the coastline. Join his epic exploration from Moreton Bay (Brisbane) to the very remote colonial settlement of Victoria on the shores of Port Essington. Follow his progress by map and description. Assist your students to become aware of the dangers faced. Understand why this long journey which was expected to take 4-6 months ended up taking nearly 14 months. Find evidence along the route by photographic inclusions. Recognise the challenges faced by members of the exploration party. Find out why the ultimate success of this exploration depended on the skills of two aboriginal guides in the group. Find out how Leichhardt contributed to the naming of features within the Australian Savanna. Work out why this expedition has been given the title of “epic”. The description, maps and photographs provide a record of the journey that had been labelled as “a failure” was to be praised as “a success”. The attachments are provided for the provision of hard copies. Your students can develop their own expedition map and the screens are numbered so that answers to the set questions can be located and filled in. You may decide to use the attachments as you screen the pages in class or you may used them as check questions when the unit has been completed. Ludwig Leichhardt is generally less well known than Burke and Wills and McDouall Stuart but this expedition places him alongside them in terms of length, difficulty and achievement. Find out why. This unit can lead on to one of the great mysteries of Australian European exploration - the mystery surrounding the disappearance of all members of Leichhardt’s exploration group on the 1848 exploration attempt to reach the Swan River Settlement from Moreton Bay (Brisbane).
KPolkinghorne
Whole Class Reading - 4 Weeks - KS2

Whole Class Reading - 4 Weeks - KS2

The benefits of whole class reading have been documented on many teaching blogs and forums. This inspired me to have a go at creating a sequence of lessons for a whole class. These whole class reading sessions were originally planned for Y5 children but can be easily adapted for children in Y4 or possibly Y6 and provide 4 weeks worth of planning and lesson presentation. Each flipchart contains 3 x 40-45 minute lessons to replace guided reading with the whole class. On the first couple of slides is an overview of the new reading curriculum objectives that will be covered. Subsequent slides are teaching slides. All reading journal activities (when they may require a worksheet) have been included. Enjoy!
RossJ1
Diamond 9: Why were the Native Americans defeated?

Diamond 9: Why were the Native Americans defeated?

This great resource is designed to help students studying the key reasons why the Native Americans were eventually defeated by the US government. It can be used as a revision activity, starter or plenary for the full range of ability and should work alongside any main stream resource on this topic. If you are looking for something more suited to lower and middle ability students, then check out my card sort on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document which can be differentiated further if you wish. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include one of the reasons why the Native Americans were defeated. Once students have cut the cards out, they are set three tasks including: Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons to explain why the Native Americans were defeated. Record and explain your reasons. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explain Once students have sorted the cards, you can extend their understanding further by discussing which factor played the most important role in their defeat. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The American West Know: How were the Native Americans defeated by the US Government? Understand: How did the US government undermine the Native American way of life? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important in undermining their way of life? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: How did the US Government defeat the Native Americans? Explain: What tactics and strategies did they use to undermine their way of life? Analyse: Which factor or combination of factors was the most successful? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
My test resource

My test resource

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rickcastle886
(Australia Geography) Australia Fun Facts-Reading Research Guide

(Australia Geography) Australia Fun Facts-Reading Research Guide

This Reading Guide for students to complete while learning about the country of Australia. The article is 6 pages long with lots of visuals. The guide is a 2 page PDF. The article is hyperlinked in the guide title for easy access, as well as included as a PDF to print. See my other Australia resources. ☀☀☀ PLEASE FOLLOW ME FOR NEW PRODUCT UPDATES ☀☀☀
Busybugsy
THE MURRAY-DARLING RIVER BASIN OF AUSTRALIA - PART 1 NATURAL WATER FLOWS

THE MURRAY-DARLING RIVER BASIN OF AUSTRALIA - PART 1 NATURAL WATER FLOWS

This is the first of a three part series on the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia. Part 1 has a focus on the physical geography of water resources, catchment areas and flows via a map and details. It also includes human elements - like the Exploration of Charles Sturt down the River Murray and the World Heritage site indicating a long human presence within the Basin. Each section has the inclusion of questions and worksheets supported by attachment pages in black and white or colour for your choice. This Basin is an important part of Aboriginal presence in the area which pre-dates the European presence. In a dry continent the resource of water is of critical significance. This opening unit will lead on to the second title - the modification of water within the Basin and then on to the third title which considers the Murray-Darling Basin Plan and the controversies over water management and distribution - issues raised during 2017.
KPolkinghorne
THE VOLCANIC CRATERS OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA -FORMATION-ABORIGINAL STORY- TOURIST ASSET

THE VOLCANIC CRATERS OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA -FORMATION-ABORIGINAL STORY- TOURIST ASSET

This unit has a focus on the creation of 4 volcanic crater lakes formed between 4000 and 5000 years ago. Through a series of labelled diagrams you will be able to explain the formation stages. The unit ties into the explanation of Aboriginal People who must have witnessed the eruption and the formation. Their story of explanation is added. Mount Gambier owes much of its tourist appeal to the presence of these crater lakes inside the volcanic rims which form a backdrop[ to the city. By broadening the area and studying the map between the two capitals of Adelaide (South Australia) and Melbourne (Victoria) the central position of Mount Gambier provides another reason for tourist stopovers. Broaden the study and Mount Gambier is adjacent to two locations of world significance - the fossil rich Naracoorte caves (World Heritage listed) and Penola which is a location of significance in the story of Saint Mary MacKillop. There are several attachments for you to use dealing with the formation process; the visit to the craters and a summary test sheet with cut and paste graphics. These graphics are clearer in the colour versions but if that isn't possible I suggest you project the colour images and discuss them. This area of South Australia deserves to be a significant tourist attraction which you will understand when you cover the material.This unit supports Destination and Location studies (UK); Natural disasters and landforms studies (Australian Curriculum). It's a bit of a pity that you will be several thousand years late to witness the volcanic eruptions.
KPolkinghorne
Religion: How Caritas Australia helps to achieve social justice

Religion: How Caritas Australia helps to achieve social justice

Two PowerPoints designed for a 9 religion unit about Social Justice and how Catholic organisations contribute to the betterment of society. 1) A PowerPoint introducing the organisation 'Caritas Australia' including their mission and values. It includes an inquiry activity which requires students to go to the Caritas website to learn more for themselves. 2) A PowerPoint looking at three of the countries Caritas assisted and how they did so (Australia, Sri Lanka and the Solomon Islands). It includes videos from the 2014 Project Compassion campaign and viewing questions for students to answer after watching each clip.
lrigb4
AUSTRALIAN HISTORY - STUDENT RESEARCH LEADING TO THE AUSTRALIAN FIRST AWARDS

AUSTRALIAN HISTORY - STUDENT RESEARCH LEADING TO THE AUSTRALIAN FIRST AWARDS

This unit requires students to search for answers to 10 statements relating to the first people to achieve some aspect of Australia's history. Most answers lie in the pages given which include visual supports, prepared maps and selected photographs. Students appreciate the investigation approach because they become involved in the process - a bit like detectives picking up clues and deciding on their relevance. The whole process is designed to help them fill in the final AWARDS PAGE where they write down the answers, the dates and the evidence they have gathered to support their decision for each award. This approach has the advantage of involvement and discovery which is very appropriate for a unit that is mainly about the discovery of Australia from 40,000 years ago through European navigators to British settlement. Take them on the discovery adventure. There are several attachments; the fill-in final page and - if you are stuck a top secret answer page. However, don't ruin the process by screening the answer sheet before they have had time to discover the answers for themselves. The attachments are given to provide flexibility of approach, recognising that some schools restrict the type and provision of printed materials. You can complete this unit by using screen alone and allowing student observation and discussion. You can, if permitted, provide hard copy worksheets for in class or home use. You have the flexibility of choice. Who were the first to...? Along with your students you can find out the answers. This unit can also form the background to a following unit dealing with the internal explorations within Australia.
KPolkinghorne
THE RACE TO BE THE FIRST EUROPEANS TO CROSS AUSTRALIA FROM SOUTH TO NORTH

THE RACE TO BE THE FIRST EUROPEANS TO CROSS AUSTRALIA FROM SOUTH TO NORTH

Take your students back in time when the European settlement of Australia was basically a number of colonial capitals spread around a vast continental interior that was basically unknown. Recognise that a series of land explorations would start filling in details about this "Great Unknown". Recognise that maps of the era, though accurate (almost) for the coastline, had little accuracy for the vast interior. Recognise, also that for European colonists communications between their homelands and Australia were frustratingly slow. Now add the interest of colonial governments in opening up land and resources of the interior so that journeys of exploration were favourably regarded and you have the background for the numerous land explorations. Then add the prospect of improved communications with Europe via an undersea cable system that would find landfall on the northern coastline and link with landline a telegraph system. Now you have the incentive for land explorations from south to north. Add the race between Victoria (Burke and Wills) and South Australia (Stuart) and you have the reasons for heightened interest. This unit traces the 3 attempts of Stuart to find the land route from Adelaide to the north coast. Using maps and first hand comments from Stuart's journal you can follow the expeditions through the centre. Share the failures, the hardships, the set backs, the contacts with the Aboriginal first occupiers. A final worksheet provides a check sheet for distribution.
KPolkinghorne
AUSTRALIA'S LARGEST NATIONAL PARK- THE PROPOSED EXPANDED KIMBERLEY NATIONAL PARK

AUSTRALIA'S LARGEST NATIONAL PARK- THE PROPOSED EXPANDED KIMBERLEY NATIONAL PARK

The Kimberley National Park is due to be proclaimed by 2019. It will be about 5 times the area of Australia's current largest National Park - Kakadu. It will have large areas of land - absorbing 5 present parks and encompassing areas of Aboriginal interest. In terms of landscape it will incorporate coastal islands, vast tidal river flats, swamps, river valleys, mountain ranges, plateaux with a large variety of wildlife and vegetation communities. It will have guardianship over a vast area which is referred to as "Australia's last great wilderness". Such a vast and diverse area will pose issues of control and management. The dilemma of how to maintain the integrity of the natural and cultural features is mentioned. The issue of allowing access and sustaining the natural environment is raised. This is an area of unique landscape with a long history of Aboriginal contact. It is also an area where dinosaurs roamed and left their imprint. There is ample opportunity for students to recognise the variations. There is also scope for debate as the 6 situations provided as attachments are considered. These can be used as class/group discussions or provided as individual worksheets. If you are looking for material that can provoke discussion and debate this unit will provide this opportunity. The material on ecotourism is provided as a parallel issue because the presence and type of tourism contact in this area will be a factor. Enjoy the excursion into the wilderness. Look around and discover the need fro protection and regulation/permits of entry.
KPolkinghorne
Card Sort: How far was Custer responsible for the defeat of the US Army at the Little Bighorn?

Card Sort: How far was Custer responsible for the defeat of the US Army at the Little Bighorn?

This outstanding resource is designed to help students evaluate how far Custer was responsible for the defeat of the US Army at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. It could be used alongside any main stream text book or resource or as an independent stand alone resource. It also makes an excellent revision activity on the topic as well as preparation for an essay or extended essay on the topic. If you would like to provide even more challenge then why not check out my diamond 9 activity on this topic. You can also download an iPad version from my TES shop. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a two page A4 sheet in Microsoft Word. The activity includes four heading cards labelled Leadership of Custer, Leadership of Reno & Benteen, Leadership of Crazy Horse and Other US Army Leaders as well as 28 statement cards. If you wish to add challenge then you could delete the heading cards and ask your students to come up with their own headings. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: What role did the US Army play in the defeat of the Plains Indians? Know: What happened during the Battle of the Little Bighorn? Understand: What roles were played by Custer and Crazy Horse in the defeat of the US Army? Evaluate: How far was Custer responsible for the defeat of the US Army at the Little Bighorn? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: What happened during the Battle of the Little Bighorn? Explain: What roles were played by Custer and Crazy Horse in the defeat of the US Army? Analyse: How far was Custer responsible for the defeat of the US Army at the Little Bighorn? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
1912 - WHEN BROOME  IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA WAS THE PEARLING CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

1912 - WHEN BROOME IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA WAS THE PEARLING CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

This unit can stand alone or it can be used as a followup to the unit entitled "The pearl shellers of the north west coast of Western Australia -a chequered history". This unit attempts to reveal the history of Broome in 1912 when pearl shelling was at its height. Take your students back in time. Look at the historical photographs and allow them to discuss what they see. The historical maps are based on several resources and are provided to enhance the other visual materials. They are generalisations. Have your students walk from the pearl shelling shed to the exporting long jetty where overseas ships tied up to take on the valuable cargo of pearl shells. On the way, if they look around at the maps and the photograph, they should gain some feeling of Broome in 1912. The attachments are provided in colour and in black and white so that you can choose which ones to use. This unit cuts across several disciplines - including geography/environment; history; racial discrimination; aboriginal studies and environment. Enjoy the walk through time.
KPolkinghorne
THE PEARL SHELLERS OF THE NORTH WEST COAST OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA - A CHEQUERED  HISTORY

THE PEARL SHELLERS OF THE NORTH WEST COAST OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA - A CHEQUERED HISTORY

Here is a unit that cuts across many areas. It has aspects of environment. It deals with Aboriginal people in the landscape.It mentions the early unfavourable reports of William Dampier. It includes the impact of European pastoralists on Aboriginal culture and survival. It looks at the evolution of pearl shelling collection from Aboriginal gathering to enforced labour of Aboriginal groups to skin diving and finally to deep sea diving using pearl luggers. It is a history of fortunes made by a few and the victimisation of others. It has aspects of racial discrimination and segregation. Take your students on this journey and you will come across a history that happened but one that is not comfortable to relate. There are two sets of attachments to assist. The first set allows your students to see the trials faced by deep sea divers. The second attachments provide question sheets provided in black and white that will test the level of understanding. This is a history, geography, landscape, social issue unit. Part 2 entitled "The Pearl Shellers of Broome 1912" is a reconstruction by maps and photographs of the settlement in the heyday of the Pearl Luggers.
KPolkinghorne
ABORIGINAL AND EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT IN THE COORONG OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

ABORIGINAL AND EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT IN THE COORONG OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Aboriginal groups occupied the Coorong area least 5000 years before European settlers arrived. Unlike most other Aboriginal groups in Australia the Coorong Aboriginal people were able to establish permanent campsites. The main area was at Parnka Point. This study will show the geographical advantage of this location - on the shores of the Coorong; within reach of the lakes; with easy access to the enclosing dunes that would later be named "The Younghusband Peninsula"; and with access to both fresh and salt water environments. The arrival of European settlers (began with Dr. Rankine in 1849) greatly impacted this Aboriginal way of life. Unlike the Aboriginal people who worked within the environment, the European settlers were environment modifiers. They converted natural bush-land into introduced cropland. They introduced new hard-hooved animals (cattle, horses, sheep) on to sensitive sandy areas. These animals damaged fresh water soaks - a major source of fresh water for Aboriginal groups. In addition the unintentional impact of European diseases devastated Aboriginal people. What had been a secure environment for Aboriginal people of the Coorong became untenable as their food gathering resources became restricted. Follow through this history which is, in essence, an example of cultural conflict. This unit is aimed at Secondary levels in Aboriginal Studies; Environmental studies and Geography.
KPolkinghorne
Card Sort: Impact of the Mountain Men on the American West

Card Sort: Impact of the Mountain Men on the American West

This resource is designed to help students studying the impact that the mountain men and early pioneers had the American West. It can be used as a revision activity, preparation for an essay on this topic or as a starter or plenary. It can be used alongside any of the main stream text books on the American West or even my PowerPoint on this topic which can be downloaded via The History Academy TES shop. This type of activity is ideal for lower and middle ability students, but I have also included some stretch and challenge in the second task. The card sort includes two heading cards labelled negative and positive consequences as well as 16 cards that can sorted underneath them. This sort of task should take a middle ability group 10 to 15 minutes and a lower ability group 20 minutes. The card sort is designed to be independent of any textbook or resource, but it would be an ideal resource to use alongside the SHP textbook The American West 1840 - 1895 or my PowerPoint on the mountain men. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The American West Know: Who were the mountain men? Understand: What negative / positive role did they play in the settlement of the American West? Evaluate: How significant was their impact on the settlement of the West? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The impact of the mountain men on the American West? Explain: What positive / negative role did they play on the settlement of the American West? Analyse: How important was their impact on the settlement of the American West? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
AN INTERESTING PILE OF GRANITE BOULDERS IN CENTRAL AUSTRALIA LANDFORM STUDY

AN INTERESTING PILE OF GRANITE BOULDERS IN CENTRAL AUSTRALIA LANDFORM STUDY

On first observation you may not think that a group of round granite boulders (tors) are interesting. However this group i n Central Australia have a long history of interest with Aboriginal people and an interest in their uniqueness and formation. The journey from Alice Springs to Darwin by road takes many hours. Not far off the Stuart Highway there are piles of rounded boulders. This unit allows closer inspection. The boulders are contained in a National Park. Their Aboriginal name is KARLU KARLU. Their European name is THE DEVIL'S MARBLES. This unit can stand alone as a unique place of interest. It could be added to the study of landforms in Arid Australia. It was originally prepared for Australian students in lower to mid secondary levels,but it will have wider appeal. Join the tourists who visit the area. Discover how the hundreds of granite boulders were formed beneath the surface and were modified above the surface. To add scope to the study a true story of damage to the boulders is added as an attachment. If you are looking for a story where the penalty fitted the method of recovery - this is one. Don't be put off by the title. It's rather a challenge to provide a title for a large group of boulders in the middle of arid Australia. Open this one. Have a look.
KPolkinghorne
GCSE American West Teaching Resources

GCSE American West Teaching Resources

This is your chance to buy all my outstanding American West resources bundled up for a massive saving. These resources are tried and tested. They are suitable for a wide range of abilities and will successfully engage your students. For more information, click on the resources.
Roy_Huggins
ARNHEM LAND - A PHOTOGRAPHIC OVERVIEW FOR THE SERIES- A USEFUL STARTING ACTIVITY

ARNHEM LAND - A PHOTOGRAPHIC OVERVIEW FOR THE SERIES- A USEFUL STARTING ACTIVITY

This selection of photographs is designed as an introduction to the series of 15 titles. It's a bit like a contents page at the start of a book but it is in photographic rather than written form. This could be used at any level to show WHAT IS THERE. It could be used to check interest level before venturing into the more detailed units. In each page there is a list of titles in the series where you can gain more information at greater depth. Try projecting the pages and finding out where student interest lies. This can be a standalone unit or it can be the introduction via selected pages to further explorations into Arnhem Land.
KPolkinghorne
CYCLONE MONICA - THE STRONGEST RECORDED IN TROPICAL AUSTRALIA

CYCLONE MONICA - THE STRONGEST RECORDED IN TROPICAL AUSTRALIA

Cyclones are major meteorological events. This unit provides an opportunity for students to follow the development, movement and impact of this Category 5 Cyclone. Although it has been the strongest recorded it did not gain the press coverage of Cyclone Tracy (December 25 1974). Reasons for this are provided in comparisons. Start with an observation of fallen trees and follow the story through the Arts and Craft Centre in Maningrida - the closest settlement to the eye of Maningrida. Then find the origin, look at the nature and mechanism of the cyclone, trace its movement and its changing strength by map. There is plenty of Web information about Cyclone Tracy if you wish to find it. There is very little available very little about Cyclone Monica. A black and white question & activity page is provided so that hard copies can be given. If your students are interested in the most powerful in a category - Cyclone Monica fits this requirement.
KPolkinghorne
ARNHEM LAND PART 7 - CULTURAL CONTRASTS ON THE COBOURG PENINSULA WEST ARNHEM LAND

ARNHEM LAND PART 7 - CULTURAL CONTRASTS ON THE COBOURG PENINSULA WEST ARNHEM LAND

This unit follows on from ARNHEM LAND PART 6c which has a focus on the establishment of the settlement of Victoria in the Cobourg Peninsula of West Arnhem Land. Using labelled photographs and a table indicating contrasts between the long term association of Aboriginal clans with the land, this unit provides materials that help answer the question about the very short term survival of the British colonial settlement. It indicates that the close association Aboriginal people had with the environment made their survival more secure than the British settlers who appeared on lands used by Aboriginal people. There are many reasons to include in answering the set question on page 6. This page is provided as a black and white attachment for hard copy provision. Question and debate the issue of survival.
KPolkinghorne
ARNHEM LAND PART 6B -HISTORY OF OBSERVATION AND 3 ATTEMPTS AT BRITISH SETTLEMENTS

ARNHEM LAND PART 6B -HISTORY OF OBSERVATION AND 3 ATTEMPTS AT BRITISH SETTLEMENTS

This unit provides an outline of early observations of Arnhem Land from the sea. The reports were largely unfavourable for the prospects of establishing British colonial settlements. They also reported sighting of Aboriginal people. The indications were that Aboriginal people would not welcome the arrival of Europeans. However there was interest in establishing British settlements in the far north for trade and security reasons. The first 3 settlements faced great hardship. None lasted longer than 11 years. The following unit (Part 6C) has a focus on Victoria - the longest surviving British outpost. In contrast to the Makassan contacts (Part 6A) the British settlements were carried out without discussion with local Aboriginal groups. This caused resentment and reaction by Aboriginal people and added to the problems for British settlers.
KPolkinghorne
Growth or decline?  How did the population of Australia change in the 1800s?

Growth or decline? How did the population of Australia change in the 1800s?

This is a source-based homework task to support student understanding of the NSW History for the Australian Curriculum Stage 5 Depth Study 1 - Making a Better World It can be used in either the topic on the Industrial Revolution or Movement of Peoples. The task can also be used to support the Stage 5 and Stage 6 (Preliminary) Aboriginal Studies syllabuses. The title of the activity is 'loaded': whilst the 1800s saw a tremendous growth in the number of British (then other) peoples moving to Australia there was also a tremendous decline in number of Aboriginal people in many parts of the country. But like all things in history, the conclusions we reach are based on the evidence we have, and this is entirely from one perspective. The activities are designed for Year 9 mixed ability classes but include some higher-order activities including examining an emigration poster for tone and implication and analysing a painting for suggestions about population change in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Australia.
WayneWoods
ARNHEM LAND PART 3 - MINING AND LAND RIGHTS IN EAST ARNHEM LAND

ARNHEM LAND PART 3 - MINING AND LAND RIGHTS IN EAST ARNHEM LAND

This unit has focus on the differing views of land ownership that existed between indigenous people of East Arnhem Land and the non-indigenous people represented by the Government in distant Canberra. It deals with the process used through the 1963 Bark Petitions sent from Yirrkala in Eastern Arnhem Land to the Federal Government in Canberra. It indicates reasons why indigenous Aboriginal people of Arnhem Land objected to the proposed granting of land leases for an overseas country to establish a complex bauxite mining and alumina refinery of the Gove Peninsula. It follows the history of rejection of the Bark Petitions to the rejection of the Law Case seeking compensation after the rejection. It indicates the situation today which has been a compromise between the mining operators and local Aboriginal people which gained Land Titles to Arnhem Land in 1978. It also shows the inaccuracy of the "policy of 'terra nullius'" in denying Land Rights for Aboriginal people. Black and white attachments are provided if hard copies are considered useful.
KPolkinghorne
ARNHEM LAND AUSTRALIA - WHERE IS IT?

ARNHEM LAND AUSTRALIA - WHERE IS IT?

This is the opening unit on Arnhem Land an extensive region in Northern Australia which is owned and controlled by Aboriginal people. In Australia Arnhem Land is regarded as remote. For non-indigenous people access requires entry permits. Arnhem Land provides opportunity for study under a range of titles as indicated by following units in the series. It is a land where Aboriginal people entered many generations ago. It is a land of contrasting landscapes from sea to coastline to rivers and floodplains and to vast woodlands which adapt to seasonal variations in rainfall. It is a land with a long history as depicted in rock paintings. It is a land of more recent history where those who contacted the Aboriginal people came via the sea and more recently across land in explorations of discovery. This first title sets the location scene. It can stand alone. To reinforce location a family reunion activity is provided as a black and white attachment so that hard copies can be provided. Once started it is hoped that you will want to further your understanding and interest in Arnhem Land by using following titles in the series. Enjoy the journey as I have!
KPolkinghorne
Landform variations in Australia-a photograph and map introduction

Landform variations in Australia-a photograph and map introduction

A range of landforms are shown by photographs and located on a map. The activity requires students to match the photograph numbers to the type of landform. Some landforms have two names - one Aboriginal name and one western name. This opens up the issues of land rights, ownership and the need for conservation and management. This title can standalone or it can be used as an introduction to "Australian Landforms" Parts 1,2,3 & 4 in which the formation processes and evolution are shown in more detail.
KPolkinghorne