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KS3 Significant Discoveries

KS3 Significant Discoveries

This bundle contains 3 full lessons within the topic - What was the most significant archaeological discovery? The lessons investigate the significance of Otzi, Pompeii and the Ice Maiden.
talesofold
Emperor Augustus Wordsearch Roman History Starter Settler Activity Homework Cover Lesson

Emperor Augustus Wordsearch Roman History Starter Settler Activity Homework Cover Lesson

Wordsearch on the theme of 'Emperor Augustus'. Powerpoint so can be used on the board or printed as a worksheet. Includes space for students to explain the keywords and suggested extension activities. Can take 10 minutes or an hour, depending on which activities the students complete. Ideal for the start of a lesson, a quick filler, a homework, part of a cover lesson or as a plenary on the board with a whiteboard pen. The idea behind these is to get students to become more literate and think independently about the words that could be used to describe the topic being taught. The repetition of the word over and over as they look for the word is useful in remembering the terms. Often the students will pick up on things that you would not normally expect!
mikedean
Significant discoveries: Pompeii full lesson

Significant discoveries: Pompeii full lesson

This is a full lesson which explores why Pompeii is a significant archaeological discovery. It contains everything needed. It has a starter, clip link with questions, main task and final written question. It also has a plenary question. This is part of a full topic which is available. Please leave a review.
talesofold
New Classical Civilisation A-Level - Politics of the Late Republic Bundle (Background to the Late Republic)

New Classical Civilisation A-Level - Politics of the Late Republic Bundle (Background to the Late Republic)

This resource contains 7 fully resourced 1 hour lessons which cover the following topics: 1) How was Rome founded? 2) Who were the first Kings of Rome? 3) How was Rome's hierarchy structured? 4) How was the Roman state organised? 5) What political factions were present in Ancient Rome? 6) Why was patronage so important in Roman life and politics? 7) Exam practice All students are differentiated to enable weaker students within your class to access the lesson and also extend the most able.
matthew_nolan
How was Rome founded? - The myth of Romulus and Remus  - Lesson 1 ( Politics of the Late Republic)

How was Rome founded? - The myth of Romulus and Remus - Lesson 1 ( Politics of the Late Republic)

This resource contains: 1x Information about the course PowerPoint 1x PowerPoint lesson 1x Myth sheet This lessons work well with the OCR Classical CIvilisation textbook - ‘Politics of the Late Republic’. In this lesson students are first introduced to the topic that they will be studying ‘the Politics of the Late Republic’ and are shown how they will be examined. After this students learn about Roman society through the myth of Romulus and Remus. Students use the myth to learn about key Roman values and predict what was important to the Romans in the time period of the course. This will work well with my other resources on the ‘Politics of the Republic’ which can be found here: Who were the first Kings of Rome? Lesson 2 How was Rome’s Hierarchy Structured? - Lesson 3 How was the Roman state structured? - Lesson 4 What political factions were present in ancient Rome? - Lesson 5 Why was patronage so important in Roman life and politics? - Lesson 6 Background to the Late Republic exam practice - Lesson 7
matthew_nolan
Who were the first Kings of Rome? Lesson 2 (Politics of the Late Republic)

Who were the first Kings of Rome? Lesson 2 (Politics of the Late Republic)

This resource contains: 1x PowerPoint 1x Information Hand This lessons work well with the OCR Classical CIvilisation textbook - ‘Politics of the Late Republic’. At the start of this lesson students reflect on the key Roman values which were learnt in lesson one by focussing on the myth of Romulus and Remus. After, students use the information sheet to learn about the seven Kings of Rome and group their positive and negative actions. Finally, students think about the impact of the Roman’s rejecting their monarchy on the different groups in Roman society. This lesson works best with my other resources created on the Politics of the Late Republic, these can be found here: How was Rome’s Hierarchy Structured? - Lesson 3 How was the Roman state structured? - Lesson 4 What political factions were present in ancient Rome? - Lesson 5 Why was patronage so important in Roman life and politics? - Lesson 6 Background to the Late Republic exam practice - Lesson 7
matthew_nolan
Developing chronological knowledge and understanding: Sample

Developing chronological knowledge and understanding: Sample

This is a sample of a selection from a range of these resources. Each of the full resource is a set of linked resources and activities to help students improve their understanding of the sequencing of events. There is a specially designed power point presentation of selected events. This is designed to convey a sense of the passage of time by having the transition between slides vary in length depending on how many years actually passed between events. Each slide has a date, event and appropriate illustration. (Each event slide is on show for five seconds and the whole presentation lasts for approximately five minutes). (There are between 24 and 30 slides in each presentation) As a bonus there is also a ‘click through’ version of the slide show. The selection of events is not meant to be definitive for the study of that period (it’s a selection not a comprehensive timeline!) – this would allow for an extra activity/challenge of students deciding what is missing/what could be left out. The same events are on a word document with a classifying task -to help students identify links within a period. Some of these events are also used for a set of sorting challenges (by focussing on the same set of events in different ways it will help boost students’ knowledge). The first involves sorting set of four or five different events into the correct order – available on power point and word document. The second is a set of printable ‘cards’ which can be used for sorting or matching tasks (such as the matching pairs game) – each event is on a separate ‘card’ from its date (organised in sets of 10). The third is a set of ‘domino cards’ where each card has an event and a date that links to another event -so making a single sequence of 10 events. There are 10 separate sets of resources: Ancient Greece; Britain before the Romans 4500BC-43AD Roman Britain 43-410AD Anglo-Saxons and Vikings 449-1066AD Periods in British history (major periods) Medieval Times (2 sub sets – England & Britain and other nations) Tudors and Stuarts (2 sub sets – Tudors & Stuarts) Industrial Revolution (and farming etc – 3 sub sets: 1694 to 1803; 1803 to 1846; 1851 to 1901 Britain (and the world) c1714 to c1900 (3 sub sets: Britain and the World; Politics and Reform ; Society and Culture Britain in the 20th century (2 sub sets – Britain & Britain and the world)
WiseArkResources
Hadrian's Wall Wordsearch Geography History Starter Settler Activity Homework Cover Lesson

Hadrian's Wall Wordsearch Geography History Starter Settler Activity Homework Cover Lesson

Wordsearch on the theme of 'Hadrian's Wall'. Powerpoint so can be used on the board or printed as a worksheet. Includes space for students to explain the keywords and suggested extension activities. Can take 10 minutes or an hour, depending on which activities the students complete. Ideal for the start of a lesson, a quick filler, a homework, part of a cover lesson or as a plenary on the board with a whiteboard pen. The idea behind these is to get students to become more literate and think independently about the words that could be used to describe the topic being taught. The repetition of the word over and over as they look for the word is useful in remembering the terms. Often the students will pick up on things that you would not normally expect!
mikedean