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Parent/child - Give me strength

Parent/child - Give me strength

This is an intervention aimed at students who suffer from low confidence, anxiety, phobias and are generally lost in their world. It differs from many of the programmes because it focuses more on them and how they navigate their world; aiming to establish triggers to their behaviour and addressing them, giving the student skills and tools to escape from their negative world. PARENTAL NOTES These students tend to be unsure of themselves and extremely vulnerable; so managing them through this intervention programme will be a delicate task. Your will know what your child goes through a little, but maybe not their triggers and thought processes. In order to effect change we must consider all things which contribute to a situation including our part in any one situation; in one of the most important relationships of your life you can help or hinder without realising. The ultimate aim is to effect positive change and instill more confidence in your child; addressing their issues and offering support and guidance where needed. WHY THIS INTERVENTION? Does your child exhibit any of the following behaviours? Withdrawn/loner Expressing fear or anxiety Cries often Expresses worthlessness Self injury/harm Avoids certain situations due to anxiety **This is a difficult one as some of these children ‘hide’ very well and can be highly functioning students apart from certain aspects of their life. I worked with one student who was in the ‘popular’ gang, but who suffered from one of the worst cases of anxiety and phobia I have ever seen. So just bear in mind that some may ‘act out’ and exhibit different behaviours. LENGTH OF INTERVENTION The sessions are divided into roughly one hour x 6 weeks plus a follow up session, however, depending on the age and concentration level of your child you could split the sessions further. Each session will have 3 worksheets to complete, you could do one at a time. BASIC OVERVIEW OF THE INTERVENTION SESSIONS How strong am I? - Getting to know you basics, with an emphasis on feelings and emotions. What pushes my buttons? - Seeking out possible negative events and issues which may have influenced the anxiety and phobia. What is my go to response? - Establishing what the ‘normal’ behaviour is and discussing alternatives. What are my triggers? - Looking at what/who may be triggering the situations, feelings and difficulties. How do I want to be? - Continuing the reframing and alternative positive framework for the future. The way forward - Cementing the positives and making plans for future issues. Follow up - General, but ongoing positive focus.
Sunshine-Groups
Maybe Tomorrow Boori Monty Pryor Activities

Maybe Tomorrow Boori Monty Pryor Activities

Maybe Tomorrow by Boori Monty Pryor and Meme McDonald Resources: Comprehension Questions for each chapter Theme tasks and questions Two jigsaw activities These were used for Year 9 English but could be adapted for older or younger students.
hamptonamy
Protest Poetry - analysing poems about The Stolen Generations

Protest Poetry - analysing poems about The Stolen Generations

A PowerPoint presentation which teaches students how to structure a paragraph using the PEEL acronym. This will be used by students when they write their reviews of the poems they will later read. The PPT includes the words to Kidnappers by Iris Clayton which explores some of the consequences of the stolen generation. Children are asked to write a PEEL paragraph in response to a set question. Depending on the ability level of the class this can be done independently or as a group with the teacher writing their suggestions on the board. This process is repeated for another two poems. I have also provided a handout with the words for each poem and the questions (for students who need hard copies). Additional resource: homework handout - a three level guide (designed to prompt higher order thinking about the topic).
lrigb4
Protest poetry - An introduction to the Stolen Generations

Protest poetry - An introduction to the Stolen Generations

This is a history style lesson designed to help children understand the Stolen Generations before the next lesson where they will view poems about this issue and have to analyse them. It introduces students to the assimilation policy, includes images of newspaper advertisements at the time (selling half-caste children) and looks at the beliefs held at the time about this issue. It includes clips from the film Rabbit Proof Fence along with questions to help check for understanding and to develop empathy. Following this, information is provided about what the institutions were like as well as historical sources (testimonies of stolen children remembering the day they were taken). Finally, it looks at the effects and consequences of the stolen generation with information taken from the Creative Spirits website. Additional resources: A handout with the questions for the Rabbit Proof Fence viewing activity. A homework handout (mind mapping the effects of the stolen generation.)
lrigb4
Protest Poetry - Intro to critical literacy terms and poetic devices

Protest Poetry - Intro to critical literacy terms and poetic devices

Two powerpoints used in a 8 English protest poetry unit I designed. The first explores: What is critical literacy and why do we need these skills? How will it help us to understand protest poems? It introduces key critical literacy terms (ideology, privileged, intended reading, marginalised, silenced etc.) It includes a list of things it is important to be aware of when viewing or reading a poem/text. It also begins to introduce students to Indigenous Australian issues as these are the first series of poems to be explored. It includes poems about colonisation and questions to prompt students to analyse these poems. The second is an introduction to poetic devices which includes definitions and examples of personification, rhyme, onomatopoeia, alliteration, simile, metaphor etc. Additional resource: A handout I use at the end of the poetic devices lesson to check whether the students have understood what was taught (it is a matching terms activity).
lrigb4
Reading comprehension using QAR strategy (social media)

Reading comprehension using QAR strategy (social media)

A reading comprehension activity which utilises the QAR reading strategy (http://www.adlit.org/strategies/19802/ & http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/question_answer_relationship) Students will read an article entitled "Teenagers and social networking – it might actually be good for them" and then complete the questions.
lrigb4
Reading comprehension about social media

Reading comprehension about social media

A reading comprehension activity I made using the THREE LEVEL GUIDE structure explained on http://www.myread.org/guide_three.htm The article is about the effects of social media on teens.
lrigb4
How to structure a persuasive speech (about political issues)

How to structure a persuasive speech (about political issues)

This lesson was designed for a year 11 class who are required to present an election speech to be on a youth advisory committee for the federal government. This lesson goes through the main aspects required for the introduction, body, and conclusion. It defines thesis statement and gives an example. It includes examples of each part of the speech (given about legalising marijuana for medicinal purposes). It reviews the PEEEL paragraphing acronym and the importance of paraphrasing, summarising and quoting. It ends with some tips for political speeches and some suggested vocabulary.
lrigb4
Australian politics - contentious issues

Australian politics - contentious issues

Looking at marriage equality and what has been said about it on Q&A (with some clips to watch). Another Q&A clip about Independent Candidate Bob Katter (in an episode about mental health) where he gets challenged by Josh Thomas about his homophobia and his denial that there are any gay people in his electorate. This lesson also looks at immigration (particularly illegal immigrants) and looks at the language used to label them. It also looks at newspaper articles and political cartoons about a drowned three year old Syrian boy, Aylan Kurdi, whose lifeless body was washed ashore in Turkey. It includes scaffolding to write an analysis of some of these political cartoons.
lrigb4
Political cartoons

Political cartoons

A lesson used in a Senior Authority English class to teach students how to analyse visual images in preparation for the QCS test. It allows students to practise their use of the following core skills or common curriculum elements (CCEs): CCE 5 Interpreting the meaning of pictures; CCE 33 Inferring; and CCE 43 Analysing. This lesson provides recent political cartoons from Australian cartoonists David Pope (from The Canberra Times) and Mark Knight from The Herald Sun. Many are about the Double Dissolution election or the recent census but there are some about the great barrier reef and privatizing medicare. This lesson provides a brief overview of the history of political cartoons in Australia. It reveals how they work and what can be learned from studying them. It revisits the concept satire and defines many of the persuasive / satirical devices they use (e.g. symbolism, caricature, labels, analogy, irony, juxtaposition, and exaggeration). It has a few example analyses and then gives the students questions to ask themselves when analyzing a political cartoon. Students then answer these questions using the cartoons provided (mostly about refugee issues).
lrigb4
AS/A-level French translation units

AS/A-level French translation units

This is a bundle of ten AS/A-level French units of work which support the sub-themes of the three English examination boards. All AQA units (year 1) are covered. Each unit consists of 7 to 9 pages of densely packed activities centred around a text and with an ultimate focus on translation into French. Tasks include matching, definitions, gap-fill, grammar drills, translation both ways, questions, comprehension, speaking and writing and vocabulary list completion. Each unit builds up in difficulty and features pre-reading and pre-translation tasks leading to three translation passages into French, graded in difficulty. You would use these during the first year of a two year course, or for revision in the second year. The 10 topics are: family, cyber-society, education, work, volunteering, music, cinema, literature, personal identity and cultural heritage. Every unit comes with answers, so you could hand these out for independent work or use them in class with little preparation. You might like to put the units together as a booklet (about 110 pages) to be kept in class or given out to students. Separately, each unit costs £3. We are selling the bundle of 10 units for £20. Once photocopied they will last you several years. The units were co-written by Gianfranco Conti and Steve Smith and apply some of the principles laid out in their book The Language Teacher Toolkit.
spsmith45