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St Georges Day Special. Higher AND Lower Abilities included.

St Georges Day Special. Higher AND Lower Abilities included.

This is a one hour lesson than can be used for all sets of pupils with the differentiated PowerPoint and worksheets. For the Higher ability students you should follow the HA link and Lower abilities follow the LA link on the slides. The worksheets are hand drawn by myself and then scanned in. The England Quiz is one I found. This lesson can be used over and over again every year and never need adapting.
DaysCount
Life In a Middle Ages Castle Assembly or Class Play

Life In a Middle Ages Castle Assembly or Class Play

Life In a Middle Ages Castle Assembly - Banquet, Battle and Joust In this Key Stage II class play or assembly, our narrator and student become time travellers to the Middle Ages - in a brief but highly eventful visit to a medieval castle! Three scenes - Banquet, Joust and Battle - in which our time travellers find themselves participating in ways they could never have imagined! Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or down; duration around 15 - 20 minutes. Sample Text: Squire: Here you are! (Looking at ‘crowd’) Best not keep this lot waiting! (Loud cheer from the crowd) Narrator: Waiting? What for? Squire: Why, you of course! You must know how much the crowd love jousts? Toby: Jousts? (Squire presents Narrator and Toby with a lance) Narrator: Oh no! No! You see, there’s been a mistake! Toby: (Holding up lance) Yes. I mean, we don’t know one end of this pole from the other! Squire: (Laughing) Oh you and your little jokes! Narrator: No, that was the last scene. Toby: There’s nothing funny about us two being brave knights! I mean, we’re not! Brave, that is! Squire: (Patting heads reassuringly) Oh, I see! It’s just a case of pre-jousting nerves. Now, take a deep breath Narrator: No, you don’t understand! We (Loud cheer goes up from waiting crowd) Squire: Now, come along! We can’t keep this lot waiting! We’ll have a riot on our hands if you don’t start soon! Toby: But we don’t know what to do! Squire: (Taking lance) Here! Hold it like this and just charge at each other on horseback! Nothing to it! Narrator & Toby: (Exclaiming together) What? Another script is available from TES and www.plays-r-ussell.com entitled Castles and Knights but this is more for Key Stage I – even though it is suggested it could be adapted to Key Stage II. There is also a script entitled St. George and the Dragon which is suitable for Key Stage I.
suesplays
KS3 History - The Black Death Full scheme of work

KS3 History - The Black Death Full scheme of work

7 Lessons with PowerPoints, worksheets, starters and plenaries, success criteria and teachers notes. Written for SEN KS3 students, this scheme of work would last my students a short term as some lessons may go over into two. Written for SEN students it is very bright,colourful and animated, appealing to visual learners who may struggle with engagement. This topic introduces KS3 students to studying resources, recognising the difference between a primary and secondary resource… then later on answering given questions on resources with the support of sentence starters. Formative teacher assessment to be carried out throughout the topic, with an assessment at the end to assess how much students have remembered throughout the term.
jillyjones1987
Anglo Saxon Battle Scenario Cards

Anglo Saxon Battle Scenario Cards

A great practical activity which guides children through a battle between the Anglo Saxons and Vikings! Allows opportunities for debating, discussion and role-play. Provides the chance for children to battle in a safe, controlled environment. Works best if your class have created swords and shields, which they can use during the activity. Curriculum Links History PHSE Speaking and Listening Design and Technology Geography
Insightsinlearning
Castles and Knights Assembly

Castles and Knights Assembly

Castles and Knights Assembly Key Stage I and/or II - Simple language but broad scope of information - script easily adapted to any age group. Although written for Key Stage I children (language kept very simple) this class play or assembly could be used at Key Stage II due to the broad scope of information. Cast of 30 - easily adjustable up or down Duration - around 10 - 15 minutes Content · The first part of the assembly deals with division between nobility and servants – their different life styles and jobs they did. · The second part looks at castle features – how they were built and how they changed over time. · The third part looks at weapons of battle – how they were used to attack and defend a castle. As previously mentioned, this assembly could be used by either of the two key stages – either simplified for younger children or elaborated upon for the older students. It is, I hope, a fairly versatile script which can be adapted for any age group. Also available off www.plays-r-ussell.com is The Battle of Hastings 1066. This assembly is for Key Stage II and goes into a lot more historical background including the events depicted and characters displayed on the Bayeux Tapestry. Sample Text (Enter Minstrel, Jester and Juggler) Minstrel: Who do you think played music at those banquets? Jester: Who do you think kept them laughing? Juggler: And who do you think entertained them? (Enter Soldiers 1 & 2) Soldier 1: And most important of all, who do you think kept them safe? Us soldiers, of course! Soldier 2: Protecting everyone against the enemy! Gong Farmer: Well. Almost most important of all! Narrator: Oh really? You think you’re more important than them? (Gong Farmer nods) Soldier 1: How? Gong Farmer: You really want to know? Soldier 2: Indeed, we do! Gong Farmer: I had to get rid of … Soldier 1: (Holding nose) Oh, now I get it! Soldier 2: You got rid of what came out of the garderobes? Narrator: The what? Soldier 2: Garderobes! Soldier 1: That’s castle toilets to you! Narrator: Ugh! Poor man! What a job! Gong Farmer: Well, someone had to do it! Narrator: Oh dear! I can see life wasn’t quite so glamourous for you folk! (All shake their heads in agreement) (Exit Gong Farmer, Servant, Cook, Hunter, Cleaner, Builder, Carpenter, Blacksmith, Priest, Steward, Minstrel, Jester, Juggler and Soldiers 1 & 2)
suesplays
Black Death vs Great Plague of London

Black Death vs Great Plague of London

This lesson was planned for Y8 students sitting the Common Entrance exam. It was designed to revise BOTH the Black Death and Great Plague of London. It asks students to pitch which of the plagues should be featured in an empty gallery in the Museum of London. This lesson works really well as students think about wider consequences which could also lead to discussion and research into increased freedoms after the Black Death etc. This lesson could be easily adapted to suit GCSE teaching of the History of Medicine. My students supplements the information sheet with relevant textbooks in my room. In the next lesson students used a past paper question to demonstrate their knowledge. Enjoy!
maxblackburn
The Vikings -  A series of LKS2 lessons

The Vikings - A series of LKS2 lessons

I have used some information from fellow TES family members but lesson ideas and presentations are my own. Some lessons have not been uploaded due to copyright. However, I am happy to disclose my lesson overview if you wish to get in touch. Thanks for looking!
_miss_sunshine_