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I'm a teacher too. All of these resources are simple and quick to download. They can be stored on a flashdrive, attached to a keyring and then they live in your pocket as easy and as ready to use as a hanky when a sneeze is coming on. Try the Nonsense Rhymes Crosswords. If you like Dr Seuss, you'll love these (and so will your students). The World News Crossword is published every Sunday evening. It's prefect for prompting discussion about current events.

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I'm a teacher too. All of these resources are simple and quick to download. They can be stored on a flashdrive, attached to a keyring and then they live in your pocket as easy and as ready to use as a hanky when a sneeze is coming on. Try the Nonsense Rhymes Crosswords. If you like Dr Seuss, you'll love these (and so will your students). The World News Crossword is published every Sunday evening. It's prefect for prompting discussion about current events.
Demand, supply, and equilibrium
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Demand, supply, and equilibrium

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A 50 slide presentation taking the students through demand, supply, equilibrium and disequilibrium. Many of the slides are animated to show the step-by-step analysis of how the price mechanism creates the market price. Suitable for (I)GCSE Economics, A Level Economics, IBDP Economics, AP Economics. Teaching idea: print the 50 slides as a handout (in the print function), three slides per page and have the students paste these pages into their workbooks and then write their own notes on and next to the slides. This will leave plenty of time for students to ask questions, discuss sections of the presentation and of course allow time to practise drawing neat supply and demand graphs. The presentation ends with a review and several questions / tasks to give students the opportunity to practise drawing the graphs (and for teachers to evaluate the students' learning_.
What happened in our world? February 14th, 2016
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What happened in our world? February 14th, 2016

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What happened in our world? February 14th, 2016 is a crossword based on last week's news events. In this week's puzzle… An earthquake in New Zealand. Pakistan tried to ban St Valentine's Day. Cuba returned a missile - no crisis though. A Spanish civil servant didn't show up for work, for six years. The Europeans are investigating the 500 Euro note. And 150,000 penguins were killed by an ice berg. Nothing this week about Donald Trump though. These are simple crosswords aiming to make our students talk about what's happening in their world, why it's happening, where, and to whom. As a bonus, there's a crossword. Name the country in which these cities are. (Or perhaps teachers could think of it as summer holiday planning.) Use them in in your home room class, in for subject lessons, in substitution lessons, in lunchtime or after school clubs, in the time-out room, or even in the staffroom.
What happened in our world? November 22nd, 2015
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What happened in our world? November 22nd, 2015

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What happened in our world? November 22nd, 2015 is a crossword based on last week's news events. It is a simple PDF so it is quick and easy to download and print. (The solutions are included, of course.) This week though, there are TWO crosswords with different clues. So where was the biggest diamond found - Botswana or Canada? What did the boy in Australia sing the national Anthem with and why did Youtube go silly about it? A volunteer firefighter from Mississippi got a new what? And the Swiss cherry orchardist picked up 4000 of what? (You just know it wasn't cherries, right?) New Zealanders began voting for a new what? And the United Nations issued a strongly worded condemnation about what? These crosswords are ideal as a research, writing and reading activity. Better than that, these crosswords will stimulate very interesting discussions. The puzzles can be completed individually or in small groups or as a week-long homework activity. Samsung and Apple spend a fortune convincing our students to use smartphones so let's have our students use their smartphones for a positive learning activity. Maybe you could start a lunchtime current events club and use these puzzles as starters for conversation topics. Or maybe you can hand them out to colleagues and have a ready, get set, go! competition to see who's the smartest in the staffroom. This week there's a BONUS crossword called, 'Which Sport?' Don't you HATE substituting for an absent colleague when the kids have nothing or not enough to do? Print some of these puzzles and have them in your classroom or in your bag ready for a vibrant (that's good-noisy) lesson. Don't forget to come back next Sunday evening for next week's puzzle, ready and waiting for Monday morning. Please feel free to post feedback about the puzzles. How did you use them with your students? What discussions followed? Who was the smartest teacher in your staffroom?
Elasticities
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Elasticities

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This powerpoint presentation covers PED, PES, YED, and XED and includes a section of exercises at the end. It's suitable for A Level, IBDP SL & HL, and AP Economics students. There are 90+ slides. They're clear and simple to read and include colourful images to turn a relatively dry topic into something a little more interesting. With witty teacher banter, to explain and expand on the slides, this presentation could take 3-4 weeks to proceed through. I strongly suggest working through one section and then using the accompanying crosswords (also available on my store) as a breakout activity. The presentation is ready to go, but can also be edited to suit your own situation. An extension section covering arc elasticity and a 'better' equation is suitable for the students who will study Economics at university.
IB Diploma Economics - Demand
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IB Diploma Economics - Demand

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A 30-slide powerpoint presentation covering the Demand section of the IB Diploma Microeconomics section - notes/explanations and the graphs. Large text and large, clear graphs. The presentation can be edited - add or delete slides, or edit the text on the slides.
Market Failure
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Market Failure

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A powerpoint presentation covering the Market Failure topic, including an explanation of market failure and detailed graphs showing the effect of externalities. The presentation is in MS Powerpoint format so it can be edited.
The World News Crossword - September 16th, 2018
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The World News Crossword - September 16th, 2018

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The World News Crossword - September 16th, 2018 - a crossword based on the events of last week’s news from around the world. There are 4 puzzles in this downloadable PDF document: (1) The World News Crossword, (2) a crossword on The Tragedy of Julius Caesar (from our book of Shakespeare Word Puzzles), (3) a crossword on Croatia (from our A World of Crosswords series), and (4) a crossword on Women in Science and Technology (from our soon-to-be-released ‘Women who changed the world’ book). So, what happened in last week’s news? A mega-hurricane. A malaria outbreak on Lombok Island. And an earthquake off the south-west of Australia. Needles in strawberries in Australia. Environmentalist in treehouses in Germany. And a whale in a stream in Madrid. London’s Mayor wants another Brexit referendum. Spain’s Prime Minister published his Ph.D. thesis online. Nigeria’s Finance Minister resigned because of forgery. And Italy’s Foreign Minister said African migrants are like slaves. Some Kenyans made a boat out of plastic rubbish collected from their beaches to highlight the problem of plastic pollution in the ocean.
Geography: Geographical Enquiry Skills
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Geography: Geographical Enquiry Skills

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Suitable for Key Stage 3 Geography, GCSE/IGCSE, or A Levels/IB Diploma. Bonus puzzles: European capitals, African capitals, Asian capitals. Each crossword makes an excellent group or individual activity and can be used as a revision/reinforcement activity. In-class or for homework. These puzzles are great for stashing away to be used when colleagues are absent. Answers included.
Shakespeare Word Puzzles
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Shakespeare Word Puzzles

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A book of 50 word puzzles, all based on ten of Shakespeare’s plays… Romeo & Juliet A midsummer night’s dream The merchant of Venice Much ado about nothing Julius Caesar Hamlet Othello King Lear Macbeth The Tempest For each play, there is a crossword about the play, a ‘Search and Cloze’ puzzle that reviews the synopsis, another crossword based on the play’s best lines, a 25-question quiz, the answers to which are in a word search grid, and finally a word search to reinforce key elements such as the characters’ names and places in the play.
Multiple choice tests (Demand, Supply, & Equilibrium)
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Multiple choice tests (Demand, Supply, & Equilibrium)

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Three one-page, 15-question multiple choice tests - one each for Demand, Supply, and Equilibrium. These tests aren't available anywhere else on the internet so the students won't have seen them before. In pdf format. Simple to download and print. Answers included.
Microeconomics Crosswords
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Microeconomics Crosswords

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A pdf booklet containing 10 crosswords based on microeconomics topics. Suitable for GCSE, IGCSE, A Level, IB Diploma, or AP Economics. One puzzle per page so they are simple and quick to print and have ready for an emergency review / revision activity or for when a colleague is absent. Solutions are included. Topics: Introduction Demand Supply Equilibrium 1 Equilibrium 2 Equilibrium 3 Elasticities Government intervention Summary 1 Summary 2
Elasticities Crosswords
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Elasticities Crosswords

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A pdf booklet including 5 crosswords on elasticities: PED, PES, YED, XED and a summary crossword. Ideal for summarising or reviewing the topic. Solutions included.
Development Economics Crossword Booklet
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Development Economics Crossword Booklet

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A (PDF) booklet containing 5 crosswords on Development Economics. There are two more 'bonus' crosswords: one of the OECD countries and one about the WTO, IMF and the World Bank. (Oh and two more crosswords just because you were very good in school today.) I have found crosswords to be an excellent activity to reinforce or summarise at the end of a unit. The students can't help themselves as they turn the activity into a competition. Often the crossword clues are not especially difficult, but the purpose is to reinforce material already learnt in an interesting way. Students enjoy doing them and ask for more. The crosswords are an easy and effective activity to give the classes when the teacher is away from school. And yes, the answers are included.
What happened in our world? October 25th, 2015
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What happened in our world? October 25th, 2015

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What happened in our world? October 25th, 2015 is a crossword based on last week's news events. It is a simple and quick to download and print and the solution is included. This puzzle is suitable for middle and high school students and depending on the way it's used could take 30-60 minutes to complete. It will encourage students to learn about their world's current events. In this week's puzzle… the huge storm off Mexico, Joe Biden's decision about running for presidency, Robert Mugabe's prize, heated tents in Calais, and the United Nations announcement that all teachers must receive free morning tea including chocolate cake (wait, I may have made that one up). This crossword is ideal as a Monday morning writing and reading activity. The crossword can be completed individually or in small groups, as a week-long homework research activity, or even as a time-out activity. Samsung and Apple are spending millions convincing our students to use smartphones so we teachers don't stand a chance. Here though is something more educational than Angry Birds and Fruit Ninja for the students to use their smartphones for. Don't you HATE substituting for an absent colleague and the kids have nothing or not enough to do? Print some of these puzzles and have them in your classroom or in your bag ready. Maybe you could start up a lunchtime current events club and use these puzzles as starters for conversation topics. This week's BONUS puzzle is another news-based crossword, but it's made up of news stories that did NOT happen. So it's a little bit of fun, perhaps for Friday afternoon. Don't forget to come back next Sunday evening for next week's 'What happened in our world?' crossword - ready and waiting for Monday morning.
What happened in our world? October 9th, 2016
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What happened in our world? October 9th, 2016

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What happened in our world? October 9th, 2016 is a crossword puzzle that explores and plays with news events that happened last week. The resource is a six-page PDF so it's quick to download and print. (Note that the resource will be discounted to £1.50 from Tuesday onwards.) What was in the news last week? Nobel prizes. Kim K West was robbed in Paris. An Italian journalist revealed the identity of an author. A referendum in Hungary failed and so did another one in Colombia. A woman was burned for 'being a witch' and in Pakistan, finally, no one can avoid prosecution for so-called honour-killings? Of course it's less about what happened, and more about why. Hopefully, as the students complete this crossword, they'll ask 'why?' Why did Russia's ambassador to the UN veto the call for a ceasefire in Syria? Doesn't he care about all those children being killed? Why is the Zimbabwe government allowing young elephants to be sold to China? Don't they care about elephants becoming extinct? Why is a statue of Gandhi being pulled down? Wasn't he a great person? There are three more crosswords attached to this news crossword, all of which can be used in substitute lessons, time-out rooms, homeroom classes… One is about Europe, another is about Africa, and another is about good books worth reading. Print these and have them ready for emergencies. I find these puzzles work best when solved in small groups or pairs. They're good for homework too. They work very well when I have to substitute for an absent colleague. (And a few of my colleagues say they enjoy doing the puzzles during staff meetings.)
Price controls
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Price controls

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A powerpoint presentation that covers floor and ceiling prices with detailed graphs showing welfare losses. . The presentation is in MS Powerpoint format so it can be edited.
What happened in our world? October 31st, 2016
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What happened in our world? October 31st, 2016

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What happened in our world? October 31st, 2016 is a crossword based on last week's news events. Use the crosswords in your home-room class, in subject lessons, in substitution lessons, in lunchtime or after school clubs, or even in the staffroom (during a staff meeting if you dare). See which department's teachers are the smartest. In this week's puzzle… Another severe earthquake in Italy. Three astronauts touched down in Kazakhstan. Police fired tear gas in Islamabad. An American Airlines plane caught fire in Chicago. Two London-bound trains were delayed because of a souvenir. And a Russian blogger may go to jail for five years for playing 'that game' in a church. These are simple crosswords aiming to encourage our students to ask about what's happening in their world. Why did Prince Charles talk about soil? Why did the Saudis bomb a Yemeni prison? Why did the Croats and Slovenes feel an earthquake and why were a famous Italian poet's manuscripts moved to Bologna? What's wrong with WhatsApp giving users' information to Facebook? As a bonus, there are TWO more crosswords. One asks students to identify the countries in which well-known landmarks are located. Where are Ben Nevis, K2, The Eiffel Tower, the Brandenburg Gate, The Great Barrier Reef, and Machu Picchu? The other bonus puzzle is for the scientists and asks students simple questions about physics, biology, chemistry, a little about the history of science.
What happened in our world? October 17th, 2016
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What happened in our world? October 17th, 2016

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What happened in our world? October 17th, 2016 is a crossword puzzle that explores and plays with news events that happened last week. The resource is a six-page PDF so it's quick to download and print. (Note that the resource will be discounted to £1.50 from Tuesday onwards.) What was in the news last week? Thousands of kilometres of New Zealand's coastline was swamped with jelly babies. Some Cardinals were upset about a McDonalds 'restaurant' opening in their building. The price of Californian oranges increased. And the World Health Organisation told governments of all countries to tax sugary drinks to combat child obesity. Of course it's less about what happened, and more about why. Hopefully the students will ask about the news as they solve the puzzle. Why might Russia be charged with war crimes in Aleppo? Why are people protesting about China reducing the size of its military? Why is Samsung's Galaxy7 phone banned from planes? Why is Norway now not giving Finland the birthday present it had planned to? Aren't they friends anymore? And jelly babies, oranges, McDonalds, and child obesity - is there a link? Wait, it wasn't jelly babies; it was jelly fish. This week there are FOUR more crosswords attached to this news crossword, all of which can be used in substitute lessons, time-out rooms, homeroom classes. Print these and have them ready for emergencies. I find these puzzles work best when solved in small groups or pairs. They're good for homework too. They work very well when I have to substitute for an absent colleague. (And a few of my colleagues say they enjoy doing the puzzles during our staff meetings.)
A sales tax's effect on a market
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A sales tax's effect on a market

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An animated powerpoint presentation that shows the effect of a sales tax on a market. The presentation includes several slides that show the detailed, step-by-step description of the effect of a sales tax on supply, price, quantity, consumer surplus, the decrease in producer surplus, the tax revenue and the deadweight loss. Teachers can proceed through the presentation while students make their own notes on the printed handout. Created for IBDP HL Economics, but useful for A Level Economics and AP Economics. Note: a matching presentation will be posted in the next few days showing the effects on a market of a subsidy.