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I'm a teacher too. All of these resources are simple and quick to download. They can be stored on a flashdrive, attached to a keyring and then they live in your pocket as easy and as ready to use as a hanky when a sneeze is coming on. Try the Nonsense Rhymes Crosswords. If you like Dr Seuss, you'll love these (and so will your students). The World News Crossword is published every Sunday evening. It's prefect for prompting discussion about current events.

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I'm a teacher too. All of these resources are simple and quick to download. They can be stored on a flashdrive, attached to a keyring and then they live in your pocket as easy and as ready to use as a hanky when a sneeze is coming on. Try the Nonsense Rhymes Crosswords. If you like Dr Seuss, you'll love these (and so will your students). The World News Crossword is published every Sunday evening. It's prefect for prompting discussion about current events.
Demand, supply, and equilibrium
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Demand, supply, and equilibrium

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A 50 slide presentation taking the students through demand, supply, equilibrium and disequilibrium. Many of the slides are animated to show the step-by-step analysis of how the price mechanism creates the market price. Suitable for (I)GCSE Economics, A Level Economics, IBDP Economics, AP Economics. Teaching idea: print the 50 slides as a handout (in the print function), three slides per page and have the students paste these pages into their workbooks and then write their own notes on and next to the slides. This will leave plenty of time for students to ask questions, discuss sections of the presentation and of course allow time to practise drawing neat supply and demand graphs. The presentation ends with a review and several questions / tasks to give students the opportunity to practise drawing the graphs (and for teachers to evaluate the students' learning_.
What happened in our world? June 12th, 2016
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What happened in our world? June 12th, 2016

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What happened in our world? June 12th, 2016 is a crossword based on last week's news events. It's low-calorie, high-fibre, high-interest, and nothing at all to do Donald Trump. In this week's puzzle… A new tourist attraction was discovered in Cambodia. UEFA threatened to disqualify England and Russia because of their fans' bad behaviour. Solar Impulse flew over New York - at night. THere was bad flooding in the UK. Someone paid $3.5 million to have dinner with Warren Buffett (would that be an all-you-can-eat dinner?) Batemans Bay (with an e) was overrun with bats. Germany's president resigned. Facebook's founder had his Twitter account hacked. Walmart in Canada will stop accepting Visa. And most people in Europe and the US can't see The Milky Way because of light pollution (anyway, many of them think it's just a chocolate bar). Oh and ABBA performed again. (Your kids won't know who ABBA is so take a CD along to class. Or Youtube them on the big screen and call it Technology in the Classroom). These are simple crosswords aiming to encourage our students to ask about what's happening in their world - Why did it happen and where? And most importantly, who are the people affected? Who was affected by ABBA? Who wasn't! As a bonus, there's a crossword asking students about fruit and veggies. You may have to take some of these along to class too. Use the crosswords in your home-room class, in subject lessons, in substitution lessons, in lunchtime or after school clubs, in the time-out room, or even in the staffroom (during a staff meeting if you dare). Keep the comments coming in - we love to hear how the crosswords are being enjoyed by you and your students.
Climate Change Crosswords
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Climate Change Crosswords

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Climate Change Crosswords is a pdf document containing 5 crosswords that focus on the greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change - and what we can do about it. There isa bonus puzzle about the Amazon Basin - perhaps the most significant region in terms of climate change. There's another crossword on The Might Mi__i__i__i River. (And then some more on Africa, Asia and Europe - for a rainy day.) Climate change is real, it’s here, and it’s getting worse, but there’s hope. That’s the message of these crosswords. Climate change is happening because of global warming which is happening because humans burn too much fossil fuel, cut down way too many trees, use cars instead of bicycles, throw away too much food, and farm too many animals. The glaciers are retreating. The ocean is warming. The polar ice masses are melting. The sea level is rising. More extreme weather events are occuring. And the worst affected are the poorest people because they tend to live near the edges of rivers and the sea. What can we do about it? Each puzzle includes suggestions. Hopefully these crosswords educate students about what is happening to the earth’s climate and its people. Hopefully they’ll learn why it’s happening and how climate change can be stopped, or mitigated. There’s something a little sneaky and tricky about crosswords. Kids feel compelled to finish them. Try them.
Shakespeare Word Puzzles
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Shakespeare Word Puzzles

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A book of 50 word puzzles, all based on ten of Shakespeare’s plays… Romeo & Juliet A midsummer night’s dream The merchant of Venice Much ado about nothing Julius Caesar Hamlet Othello King Lear Macbeth The Tempest For each play, there is a crossword about the play, a ‘Search and Cloze’ puzzle that reviews the synopsis, another crossword based on the play’s best lines, a 25-question quiz, the answers to which are in a word search grid, and finally a word search to reinforce key elements such as the characters’ names and places in the play.
Macroeconomics Crosswords
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Macroeconomics Crosswords

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This 13 page PDF booklet contains 5 crosswords that review macroeconomics: Introduction to macroeconomics The overall level of macroeconomic activity Macroeconomic goals The ADAS model Macroeconomic policies Crosswords work well as group activities or as homework activities or for a pre-exam revision activity. There are three bonus puzzles (The OECD countries, The WTO, World Bank & IMF and a surprise - because almost everyone loves surprises!) These bonus puzzles are handy to have printed and ready to use on 'emergency' days. Of course, the answers are included.
Microeconomics Crosswords
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Microeconomics Crosswords

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A pdf booklet containing 10 crosswords based on microeconomics topics. Suitable for GCSE, IGCSE, A Level, IB Diploma, or AP Economics. One puzzle per page so they are simple and quick to print and have ready for an emergency review / revision activity or for when a colleague is absent. Solutions are included. Topics: Introduction Demand Supply Equilibrium 1 Equilibrium 2 Equilibrium 3 Elasticities Government intervention Summary 1 Summary 2
Geography: Geographical Enquiry Skills
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Geography: Geographical Enquiry Skills

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Suitable for Key Stage 3 Geography, GCSE/IGCSE, or A Levels/IB Diploma. Bonus puzzles: European capitals, African capitals, Asian capitals. Each crossword makes an excellent group or individual activity and can be used as a revision/reinforcement activity. In-class or for homework. These puzzles are great for stashing away to be used when colleagues are absent. Answers included.
What happened in our world? October 4th, 2015
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What happened in our world? October 4th, 2015

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What happened in our world? October 4th, 2015 is a crossword based on last week's news events. It is a simple PDF so it is quick to download and print for your class. (The solution is included.) This activity sheet is suitable for middle and high school students. It will encourage students to learn about their world's current events. What happened near Guatemala City? What did the Prime Minister of New Zealand say about the UN Security Council? What did Russia and Estonia swap? And which city made it an offence to drop cigarette butts in the street? This crossword is ideal as a Monday morning writing and reading activity, individually or in small groups, as a week long homework research activity, even as a time-out activity. (Give them a positive reason to use their smart-phones in class.) The puzzle can also be used as a staff activity. Ideal for Language and Social Studies classes, this week's resource includes a BONUS puzzle called 'Who wrote this book?' Who wrote Don Quixote? Who wrote Treasure Island? This bonus puzzle can be used when substituting for another teacher. Don't forget to come back next Sunday evening for next week's 'What happened in our world?' puzzle.
What happened in our world? February 14th, 2016
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What happened in our world? February 14th, 2016

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What happened in our world? February 14th, 2016 is a crossword based on last week's news events. In this week's puzzle… An earthquake in New Zealand. Pakistan tried to ban St Valentine's Day. Cuba returned a missile - no crisis though. A Spanish civil servant didn't show up for work, for six years. The Europeans are investigating the 500 Euro note. And 150,000 penguins were killed by an ice berg. Nothing this week about Donald Trump though. These are simple crosswords aiming to make our students talk about what's happening in their world, why it's happening, where, and to whom. As a bonus, there's a crossword. Name the country in which these cities are. (Or perhaps teachers could think of it as summer holiday planning.) Use them in in your home room class, in for subject lessons, in substitution lessons, in lunchtime or after school clubs, in the time-out room, or even in the staffroom.
What happened in our world? November 7th, 2016
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What happened in our world? November 7th, 2016

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What happened in our world? November 7th, 2016 is a crossword based on last week's news events. Use the crosswords in your home-room class, in subject lessons, in substitution lessons, in lunchtime or after school clubs, or even in the staffroom (during a staff meeting). See which department's teachers are the smartest. In this week's puzzle… The Peruvians released baby turtles into the Amazon region and two Australians stood on a turtle and posted their selfie on the internet. Elsewhere in Australia a Danish tourist slipped, few, and landed on the back of a crocodile. And it bit him. Vladimir Putin unveiled a statue of... St Vladimir. The government closed schools in Delhi because of air pollution, cigarettes were declared the number one cause of non-contagious disease deaths and drug-resistant tuberculosis is far more widespread in Nigeria than previously thought. Egypt floated its currency and increased the price of energy. Canada's spy agency kept data on non-threatening citizens, their military investigated a mysterious pinging sound in the Arctic, and a diver found an old bomb. See, there was more in the news than Donald You-Know-Who. This is a simple crossword aiming to encourage students to ask about what's happening in their world. How did tuberculosis become drug-resistant? Why aren't cigarettes illegal if they're so bad? Why did Britain's pound lose value and then regain it at the end of the week? As a bonus, there are TWO more crosswords. One asks students to identify the country of origin of some unique things - such as the rouble, the Urdu language, the RCMP, and kangaroos. The other puzzle is for the Economics teacher (or for when you have to supervise an Economics class).
What happened in our world? October 17th, 2016
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What happened in our world? October 17th, 2016

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What happened in our world? October 17th, 2016 is a crossword puzzle that explores and plays with news events that happened last week. The resource is a six-page PDF so it's quick to download and print. (Note that the resource will be discounted to £1.50 from Tuesday onwards.) What was in the news last week? Thousands of kilometres of New Zealand's coastline was swamped with jelly babies. Some Cardinals were upset about a McDonalds 'restaurant' opening in their building. The price of Californian oranges increased. And the World Health Organisation told governments of all countries to tax sugary drinks to combat child obesity. Of course it's less about what happened, and more about why. Hopefully the students will ask about the news as they solve the puzzle. Why might Russia be charged with war crimes in Aleppo? Why are people protesting about China reducing the size of its military? Why is Samsung's Galaxy7 phone banned from planes? Why is Norway now not giving Finland the birthday present it had planned to? Aren't they friends anymore? And jelly babies, oranges, McDonalds, and child obesity - is there a link? Wait, it wasn't jelly babies; it was jelly fish. This week there are FOUR more crosswords attached to this news crossword, all of which can be used in substitute lessons, time-out rooms, homeroom classes. Print these and have them ready for emergencies. I find these puzzles work best when solved in small groups or pairs. They're good for homework too. They work very well when I have to substitute for an absent colleague. (And a few of my colleagues say they enjoy doing the puzzles during our staff meetings.)
What happened in our world? October 9th, 2016
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What happened in our world? October 9th, 2016

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What happened in our world? October 9th, 2016 is a crossword puzzle that explores and plays with news events that happened last week. The resource is a six-page PDF so it's quick to download and print. (Note that the resource will be discounted to £1.50 from Tuesday onwards.) What was in the news last week? Nobel prizes. Kim K West was robbed in Paris. An Italian journalist revealed the identity of an author. A referendum in Hungary failed and so did another one in Colombia. A woman was burned for 'being a witch' and in Pakistan, finally, no one can avoid prosecution for so-called honour-killings? Of course it's less about what happened, and more about why. Hopefully, as the students complete this crossword, they'll ask 'why?' Why did Russia's ambassador to the UN veto the call for a ceasefire in Syria? Doesn't he care about all those children being killed? Why is the Zimbabwe government allowing young elephants to be sold to China? Don't they care about elephants becoming extinct? Why is a statue of Gandhi being pulled down? Wasn't he a great person? There are three more crosswords attached to this news crossword, all of which can be used in substitute lessons, time-out rooms, homeroom classes… One is about Europe, another is about Africa, and another is about good books worth reading. Print these and have them ready for emergencies. I find these puzzles work best when solved in small groups or pairs. They're good for homework too. They work very well when I have to substitute for an absent colleague. (And a few of my colleagues say they enjoy doing the puzzles during staff meetings.)
A sales tax's effect on a market
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A sales tax's effect on a market

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An animated powerpoint presentation that shows the effect of a sales tax on a market. The presentation includes several slides that show the detailed, step-by-step description of the effect of a sales tax on supply, price, quantity, consumer surplus, the decrease in producer surplus, the tax revenue and the deadweight loss. Teachers can proceed through the presentation while students make their own notes on the printed handout. Created for IBDP HL Economics, but useful for A Level Economics and AP Economics. Note: a matching presentation will be posted in the next few days showing the effects on a market of a subsidy.
Price controls
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Price controls

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A powerpoint presentation that covers floor and ceiling prices with detailed graphs showing welfare losses. . The presentation is in MS Powerpoint format so it can be edited.
Market Failure
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Market Failure

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A powerpoint presentation covering the Market Failure topic, including an explanation of market failure and detailed graphs showing the effect of externalities. The presentation is in MS Powerpoint format so it can be edited.
What happened in our world? October 31st, 2016
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What happened in our world? October 31st, 2016

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What happened in our world? October 31st, 2016 is a crossword based on last week's news events. Use the crosswords in your home-room class, in subject lessons, in substitution lessons, in lunchtime or after school clubs, or even in the staffroom (during a staff meeting if you dare). See which department's teachers are the smartest. In this week's puzzle… Another severe earthquake in Italy. Three astronauts touched down in Kazakhstan. Police fired tear gas in Islamabad. An American Airlines plane caught fire in Chicago. Two London-bound trains were delayed because of a souvenir. And a Russian blogger may go to jail for five years for playing 'that game' in a church. These are simple crosswords aiming to encourage our students to ask about what's happening in their world. Why did Prince Charles talk about soil? Why did the Saudis bomb a Yemeni prison? Why did the Croats and Slovenes feel an earthquake and why were a famous Italian poet's manuscripts moved to Bologna? What's wrong with WhatsApp giving users' information to Facebook? As a bonus, there are TWO more crosswords. One asks students to identify the countries in which well-known landmarks are located. Where are Ben Nevis, K2, The Eiffel Tower, the Brandenburg Gate, The Great Barrier Reef, and Machu Picchu? The other bonus puzzle is for the scientists and asks students simple questions about physics, biology, chemistry, a little about the history of science.
What happened in our world? October 1st, 2016
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What happened in our world? October 1st, 2016

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What happened in our world? October 1st, 2016 is a crossword puzzle that explores and plays with news events that happened last week. The resource is a six-page PDF so it's quick to download and print. (Note that the resource will be discounted to £1.50 from Tuesday onwards.) What was in the news last week? Prince William refused to greet Justin Trudeau.The Ryder Cup teed off. Turkey shut down 20 radio and television stations. The Rosetta probe was deliberately crashed into a comet. Hurricane Matthew stormed into the Caribbean. Shimon Peres died. Two Van Gogh paintings were recovered 14 years after they were stolen. And Boris Johnson said he has a beautiful washing machine. Of course it's not so much about what happened, but why. Hopefully as the students complete this crossword, they'll ask 'why?' Why was electricity cut in an entire Australian state? Why has the African elephant population fallen so quickly? Why will lorries be banned from inner London? Why is the Swedish government reinstating compulsory military training? And why has the UN still not done anything substantial to end the war in Syria? There are three more crosswords attached to this news crossword, all of which can be used in substitute lessons, time-out rooms, homeroom classes… One is simply about pairs… mothers and father, brothers and sisters, left and right, chocolate and teachers. Another bonus puzzle asks students to identify countries' capitals. What's the capital of Samoa, Australia, Croatia, Japan, Eritrea, Morocco… (and where would be good for an adventure?) The last of this week's bonus puzzles is all about Africa. I find these puzzles work best when solved in small groups or pairs. They're good for homework too. They work very well when I have to substitute for an absent colleague. (And a few of my colleagues say they enjoy doing the puzzles during staff meetings.)
What happened in our world? October 24th, 2016
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What happened in our world? October 24th, 2016

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What happened in our world? October 24th, 2016 is a crossword based on last week's news events. It's low-calorie, high-fibre, high-interest, and nothing at all to do Donald Trump even though he was in the news a little bit. In this week's puzzle… Wonder Woman? What? Taliban members went from Qatar to Pakistan to chat about peace in Afghanistan. And finally some children were allowed to leave The Jungle in Calais to be reunited with their families in Britain. Mumbai police promised to protect the movie theatres. Nestlé suggested the price of Kit Kats in the UK may have to increase. And bull fighting in Spain was in the news again. These are simple crosswords aiming to encourage our students to ask about what's happening in their world - Why did it happen and where? Why did a landing craft explode on Mars? Why did Canada's trade minister walk out of a very important negotiation meeting? Why did Thailand's football season end early? As a bonus, there are two more crosswords asking students about the world around them. Where is Tirana? What are the residents of Italy's capital called. Where is Dubrovnik? And Brasilia? And Fort William. If there's an avalanche on Mt Erebus, how many people would run for their lives? Use the crosswords in your home-room class, in subject lessons, in substitution lessons, in lunchtime or after school clubs, in the time-out room, or even in the staffroom (during a staff meeting if you dare).
World Economics News
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World Economics News

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This resource contains three crosswords... 1. World Economics News A crossword based on Economics events in the news over the last 2-3 weeks. Egypt floated its currency in preparation for an IMF loan. The UK Pound fell, but then rose again. Venezuela's economic chaos is causing a mini-boom for Brazil's border towns. Economists have warned of stagflation for Britain. Google made a huge profit in Ireland but didn't pay much tax. Vietnam's government is aiming to stimulate consumer spending... and more. This crossword is not intended to be difficult. It will hopefully stimulate discussion about the Economics that's happening in the world right now. 2. Supply, demand, equilibrium, and elasticities Just as it says on the label... a crossword to reinforce the students' learning of supply, demand, equilibrium, and elasticities. Suitable for GCSE, A Level, IB Diploma, and AP Economics. 3. What happened in the world last week? November 7th, 2016 This puzzle is published every week and is pasted into this resource as a "freebie" sample. A simple crossword based last week's news... politics, elections, sports, business, weather, geography... it's all in there and it's all good discussion material. Excellent for when you have to substitute for an absent colleague. Yes, all the answers are included.