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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-B7 Non-communicable diseases-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B7 Non-communicable diseases-Complete bundle

5 Resources
This bundle includes the B7 unit-Non-communicable diseases. This is a combined science unit. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required although URL has also been provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 20% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Non-communicable diseases Lesson 2-Cancer Lesson 3-Smoking and risk of disease Lesson 4-Diet, exercise and disease Lesson 5-Alcohol and other carcinogens
AQA new specification-B2-Cell division-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B2-Cell division-Complete bundle

5 Resources
This bundle includes the B2 unit-Cell division. These resources have been designed for a higher ability class. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required) although URL link can be found in slide notes, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 25% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Cell division (mitosis) Lesson 2-Grown and differentiation Lesson 3-Stem cells (introduction) Lesson 4-Stem cell dilemmas Lesson 5-(optional) Cauliflower cloning practical.
AQA new specification- Cancer-B7.2
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AQA new specification- Cancer-B7.2

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Cancer lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, video, worksheet and mini review. AQA spec link: 4.2.2.7 Relevant chapter: B7 Non-communicable diseases. AQA Biology combined textbook-Page 102-103 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe cancer as the result of changes in cells that lead to uncontrolled growth and division. Benign tumours are growths of abnormal cells which are contained in one area, usually within a membrane. They do not invade other parts of the body. Malignant tumour cells are cancers. They invade neighbouring tissues and spread to different parts of the body in the blood where they form secondary tumours. Scientists have identified lifestyle risk factors for various types of cancer. There are also genetic risk factors for some cancers.
AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 2-Microbiology-B5
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AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 2-Microbiology-B5

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Investigate the effect of antiseptics or antibiotics on bacterial growth. (RP 2-separate science). This practical was completed in two lessons, students spent the second lesson measuring the zones of inhibition as well as calculating bacterial growth. Homework on bacterial divisions has also been included. NB: Please see B5.4 Preventing bacterial growth if you would like the lesson that follows after this practical. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.6 Relevant chapter: B5 Communicable diseases. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 80-81 In doing this practical students should cover these parts of the apparatus and techniques requirements. AT 1 – use appropriate apparatus to record length and area. AT 3 – use appropriate apparatus and techniques to observe and measure the process of bacterial growth. AT 4 – safe and ethical use of bacteria to measure physiological function and response to antibiotics and antiseptics in the environment. AT 8 – the use of appropriate techniques and qualitative reagents in problem-solving contexts to find the best antibiotic to use or the best concentration of antiseptic to use.
AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4
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AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4

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DNA and the genome lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.4 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 202-203. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the structure of DNA and define genome. The genetic material in the nucleus of a cell is composed of a chemical called DNA. DNA is a polymer made up of two strands forming a double helix. The DNA is contained in structures called chromosomes. A gene is a small section of DNA on a chromosome. Each gene codes for a particular sequence of amino acids, to make a specific protein. The genome of an organism is the entire genetic material of that organism. The whole human genome has now been studied and this will have great importance for medicine in the future. Students should be able to discuss the importance of understanding the human genome. This is limited to the: • search for genes linked to different types of disease • understanding and treatment of inherited disorders • use in tracing human migration patterns from the past.
AQA new specification-Cell division (mitosis)-B2.1
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AQA new specification-Cell division (mitosis)-B2.1

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Cell division (mitosis) lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and worksheet. AQA spec link: 4.1.2.1 & 4.1.2.2 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 26-27 Specification requires students to know the following; The nucleus of a cell contains chromosomes made of DNA molecules. Each chromosome carries a large number of genes. In body cells the chromosomes are normally found in pairs. Cells divide in a series of stages called the cell cycle. Students should be able to describe the stages of the cell cycle, including mitosis. During the cell cycle the genetic material is doubled and then divided into two identical cells. Before a cell can divide it needs to grow and increase the number of sub-cellular structures such as ribosomes and mitochondria. The DNA replicates to form two copies of each chromosome. In mitosis one set of chromosomes is pulled to each end of the cell and the nucleus divides. Finally the cytoplasm and cell membranes divide to form two identical cells. Students need to understand the three overall stages of the cell cycle but do not need to know the different phases of the mitosis stage. Cell division by mitosis is important in the growth and development of multi-cellular organisms. Students should be able to recognise and describe situations in given contexts where mitosis is occurring.
AQA new specification-Vaccination-B6.1
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AQA new specification-Vaccination-B6.1

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Vaccination lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher tier class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 4.3.1.7 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating disease. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 98-99 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain how vaccination will prevent illness in an individual, and how the spread of pathogens can be reduced by immunising a large proportion of the population. Vaccination involves introducing small quantities of dead or inactive forms of a pathogen into the body to stimulate the white blood cells to produce antibodies. If the same pathogen re-enters the body the white blood cells respond quickly to produce the correct antibodies, preventing infection. Students do not need to know details of vaccination schedules and side effects associated with specific vaccines.
AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B12.3 TRILOGY
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AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B12.3 TRILOGY

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DNA and the genome lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a TRILOGY class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.4 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA trilogy textbook-Page 166-167. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the structure of DNA and define genome. The genetic material in the nucleus of a cell is composed of a chemical called DNA. DNA is a polymer made up of two strands forming a double helix. The DNA is contained in structures called chromosomes. A gene is a small section of DNA on a chromosome. Each gene codes for a particular sequence of amino acids, to make a specific protein. The genome of an organism is the entire genetic material of that organism. The whole human genome has now been studied and this will have great importance for medicine in the future. Students should be able to discuss the importance of understanding the human genome. This is limited to the: • search for genes linked to different types of disease • understanding and treatment of inherited disorders • use in tracing human migration patterns from the past
AQA new specification-Infertility treatments-B11.8
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AQA new specification-Infertility treatments-B11.8

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Infertility treatments lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and practice questions with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. *Note-For higher tier only* AQA spec link:5.3.6 Relevant chapter: B11.8-Infertility treatments . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 174-175. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the use of hormones in modern reproductive technologies to treat infertility. This includes giving FSH and LH in a ‘fertility drug’ to a woman. She may then become pregnant in the normal way. In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) treatment: • IVF involves giving a mother FSH and LH to stimulate the maturation of several eggs. • The eggs are collected from the mother and fertilised by sperm from the father in the laboratory. • The fertilised eggs develop into embryos. • At the stage when they are tiny balls of cells, one or two embryos are inserted into the mother’s uterus (womb). Although fertility treatment gives a woman the chance to have a baby of her own: • it is very emotionally and physically stressful • the success rates are not high • it can lead to multiple births which are a risk to both the babies and the mother.
AQA new specification-Genetic engineering B14.4
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AQA new specification-Genetic engineering B14.4

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Genetic engineering lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability (trilogy/combined) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.2.4 Relevant chapter: B13 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 224-225. Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe genetic engineering as a process which involves modifying the genome of an organism by introducing a gene from another organism to give a desired characteristic. Plant crops have been genetically engineered to be resistant to diseases or to produce bigger better fruits. Bacterial cells have been genetically engineered to produce useful substances such as human insulin to treat diabetes. Students should be able to explain the potential benefits and risks of genetic engineering in agriculture and in medicine and that some people have objections. In genetic engineering, genes from the chromosomes of humans and other organisms can be ‘cut out’ and transferred to cells of other organisms. Crops that have had their genes modified in this way are called genetically modified (GM) crops. GM crops include ones that are resistant to insect attack or to herbicides. GM crops generally show increased yields. Concerns about GM crops include the effect on populations of wild flowers and insects. Some people feel the effects of eating GM crops on human health have not been fully explored. Modern medical research is exploring the possibility of genetic modification to overcome some inherited disorders. (HT) Students should be able to describe the main steps in the process of genetic engineering. In genetic engineering: • enzymes are used to isolate the required gene; this gene is inserted into a vector, usually a bacterial plasmid or a virus • the vector is used to insert the gene into the required cells • genes are transferred to the cells of animals, plants, or microorganisms at an early stage (egg or embryo) in their development so that they develop with desired characteristics.
AQA new specification-Gene expression and mutation-B13.6
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AQA new specification-Gene expression and mutation-B13.6

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Gene expression and mutation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). NB: BIOLOGY ONLY-HT. Designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 6.1.5 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 206-207. Specification requires students to know the following; (HT only) Mutations occur continuously. Most do not alter the protein, or only alter it slightly so that its appearance or function is not changed. (HT only) A few mutations code for an altered protein with a different shape. An enzyme may no longer fit the substrate binding site or a structural protein may lose its strength. (HT only) Not all parts of DNA code for proteins. Non-coding parts of DNA can switch genes on and off, so variations in these areas of DNA may affect how genes are expressed.
AQA new specification-B8 Photosynthesis-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B8 Photosynthesis-Complete bundle

6 Resources
This bundle includes the B8 unit-Photosynthesis. This is a combined science unit. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required although URL has also been provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 17% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Photosynthesis (introduction) Lesson 2-Rate of photosynthesis Lesson 3-Required practical 6 Lesson 4-How plants use glucose Lesson 5-Making the most of photosynthesis
AQA new specification- Non-communicable diseases-B7.1
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AQA new specification- Non-communicable diseases-B7.1

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Non-communicable diseases lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. There is a strong overlap between this lesson and B5-health to revise what was taught before summer. Includes: slide animations, AQA spec link: 4.2.2.6 Relevant chapter: B7 Non-communicable diseases. AQA Biology combined textbook-Page 100-101 Specification requires students to know the following; Risk factors are linked to an increased rate of a disease. •aspects of a person’s lifestyle •substances in the person’s body or environment. A causal mechanism has been proven for some risk factors, but not in others. •Carcinogens, including ionising radiation, as risk factors in cancer. Many diseases are caused by the interaction of a number of factors.
AQA new specification-Preventing bacterial growth-B5.4
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AQA new specification-Preventing bacterial growth-B5.4

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NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Preventing bacterial growth in the lab lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions, answers and homework have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.6 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 80-81. 1.1.6 Bacteria multiply by simple cell division (binary fission) as often as once every 20 minutes if they have enough nutrients and a suitable temperature. Students should be able to calculate cross-sectional areas of colonies or clear areas around colonies using r². Students should be able to calculate the number of bacteria in a population after a certain time if given the mean division time. Students should be able to express the answer in standard form.
AQA new specification-Growing bacteria in the lab-B5.3
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AQA new specification-Growing bacteria in the lab-B5.3

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NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Growing bacteria in the lab lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.6 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 78-79. Bacteria multiply by simple cell division (binary fission) as often as once every 20 minutes if they have enough nutrients and a suitable temperature. Bacteria can be grown in a nutrient broth solution or as colonies on an agar gel plate. Uncontaminated cultures of microorganisms are required for investigating the action of disinfectants and antibiotics. Students should be able to describe how to prepare an uncontaminated culture using aseptic technique. They should be able to explain why: • Petri dishes and culture media must be sterilised before use to kill unwanted microorganisms • inoculating loops used to transfer microorganisms to the media must be sterilised by passing them through a flame • the lid of the Petri dish should be secured with adhesive tape to prevent microorganisms from the air contaminating the culture, and stored upside down • in school and college laboratories, cultures should be incubated at a maximum temperature of 25 °C.
AQA new specification-Exchanging materials-B1.10
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AQA new specification-Exchanging materials-B1.10

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Exchanging materials lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet, and homework (with MS) AQA spec link: 4.1.3.1 Relevant chapter: B1 Cell structure and transport. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 22-23 Specification requires students to know the following; A single-celled organism has a relatively large surface area to volume ratio. This allows sufficient transport of molecules into and out of the cell to meet the needs of the organism. Students should be able to calculate and compare surface area to volume ratios. Students should be able to explain the need for exchange surfaces and a transport system in multicellular organisms in terms of surface area to volume ratio. Students should be able to explain how the small intestine and lungs in mammals, gills in fish, and the roots and leaves in plants, are adapted for exchanging materials. In multicellular organisms, surfaces and organ systems are specialised for exchanging materials. This is to allow sufficient molecules to be transported into and out of cells for the organism’s needs. The effectiveness of an exchange surface is increased by: •• having a large surface area •• a membrane that is thin, to provide a short diffusion path •• (in animals) having an efficient blood supply •• (in animals, for gaseous exchange) being ventilated.
AQA new specification-Growth and differentiation-B2.2
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AQA new specification-Growth and differentiation-B2.2

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Growth and differentiation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded video, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.4 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 28-29 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the importance of cell differentiation. As an organism develops, cells differentiate to form different types of cells. • Most types of animal cell differentiate at an early stage. ••Many types of plant cells retain the ability to differentiate throughout life. In mature animals, cell division is mainly restricted to repair and replacement. As a cell differentiates it acquires different sub-cellular structures to enable it to carry out a certain function. It has become a specialised cell.
AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 1-Microscopy-B1
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AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 1-Microscopy-B1

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To use a light microscope to observe, draw and label a selection of plant and animal cells. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.5 Relevant chapter: B1 Cells and organisation. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 4-5 In doing this practical students should cover these parts of the apparatus and techniques requirements. Biology AT 1 – use appropriate apparatus to record length and area. Biology AT 7 – use a microscope to make observations of biological specimens and produce labelled scientific drawings
Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Assignment template
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Assignment template

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Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim D: Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work. How did i teach this? This assignment allows students to review the skills they attained in this unit. It also reiterates the importance of H&S as well as professional practice. Before setting the assignment i first taught three lessons covering the content in Pearson BTEC national-Applied science-Student book 1. Due to the complexity of this assignment i provided my students with a template which covered the P/M/D criteria (please see attached). This prevented students from going off on a tangent and also ensured they had mentioned the key skills for both assignment B and C. I’ve also attached a specification and the assignment brief to tie it altogether nicely. Hope it helps you with marking also!
AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6  PAST PAPER QUESTION
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AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6 PAST PAPER QUESTION

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I've uploaded a couple of past paper questions for the Hormones and menstrual cycle topic (B11.6). I've also included the mark scheme, which has been edited so that it is student friendly (mark schemes are quite difficult to interpret). Thought this might be useful as a review task that students can self/peer assess. This is a complimentary resource, if you wish to purchase i have also designed a lesson for this topic simply search ' AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6' Good luck with your lesson!