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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-B6 Preventing and treating disease-Combined/Additional science bundle
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AQA new specification-B6 Preventing and treating disease-Combined/Additional science bundle

4 Resources
This bundle includes the B6 unit-Preventing and treating disease. This is a combined science unit. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required except for a BBC-drug trials video-URL provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 23% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Vaccination Lesson 2-Antibiotics and painkillers (L1) (taught this over 2 lessons, both included in this resource pack). Lesson 3-Antibiotics and painkillers (L2) Lesson 4-Discovering drugs Lesson 5-Developing drugs
AQA new specification-Theories of evolution-B15.2
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AQA new specification-Theories of evolution-B15.2

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Theories of evolution lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.3.1 Relevant chapter: B15 Genetics and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 236-237 Students are required to know the following; Charles Darwin, largely as a result of observations on a round the world expedition, linked to developing knowledge of geology and fossils, proposed the theory of natural selection: • Individual organisms within a particular species show a wide range of variation for a characteristic. • Individuals with characteristics most suited to the environment are more likely to survive to breed successfully. • The characteristics that have enabled these individuals to survive are then passed on to the next generation. Other theories, including that of Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, are based mainly on the idea that changes that occur in an organism during its lifetime can be inherited. We now know that in the vast majority of cases this type of inheritance cannot occur. A study of creationism is not required.
AQA new specification-The importance of communities-B16.1
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AQA new specification-The importance of communities-B16.1

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The importance of communities lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.1.1 Relevant chapter: B16 Adaptations, interdependence and competitions. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 258-259 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe: •different levels of organisation in an ecosystem from individual organisms to the whole ecosystem • the importance of interdependence and competition in a community. An ecosystem is the interaction of a community of living organisms (biotic) with the non-living (abiotic) parts of their environment. To survive and reproduce, organisms require a supply of materials from their surroundings and from the other living organisms there. Plants in a community or habitat often compete with each other for light and space, and for water and mineral ions from the soil. Animals often compete with each other for food, mates and territory. Within a community each species depends on other species for food, shelter, pollination, seed dispersal etc. If one species is removed it can affect the whole community. This is called interdependence. A stable community is one where all the species and environmental factors are in balance so that population sizes remain fairly constant.
AQA new specification-Ethics of genetic technologies-B14.7
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AQA new specification-Ethics of genetic technologies-B14.7

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"Please note this lesson has been changed since the former review, view the comments for more details* Genetic engineering lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability (trilogy/combined) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.2.4 Relevant chapter: B14 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 230-231. Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain the potential benefits and risks of genetic engineering in agriculture and in medicine and that some people have objections. Concerns about GM crops include the effect on populations of wild flowers and insects. Some people feel the effects of eating GM crops on human health have not been fully explored.
AQA new specification-Principles of homeostasis-B10.1
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AQA new specification-Principles of homeostasis-B10.1

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Principles of homeostasis lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.5.1 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 133-134 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain that homeostasis is the regulation of the internal conditions of a cell or organism to maintain optimum conditions for function in response to internal and external changes. Homeostasis maintains optimal conditions for enzyme action and all cell functions. In the human body, these include control of: • blood glucose concentration • body temperature • water levels. These automatic control systems may involve nervous responses or chemical responses. All control systems include: • cells called receptors, which detect stimuli (changes in theenvironment) • coordination centres (such as the brain, spinal cord and pancreas) that receive and process information from receptors • effectors, muscles or glands, which bring about responses which restore optimum levels.
AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4
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AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4

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DNA and the genome lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.4 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 202-203. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the structure of DNA and define genome. The genetic material in the nucleus of a cell is composed of a chemical called DNA. DNA is a polymer made up of two strands forming a double helix. The DNA is contained in structures called chromosomes. A gene is a small section of DNA on a chromosome. Each gene codes for a particular sequence of amino acids, to make a specific protein. The genome of an organism is the entire genetic material of that organism. The whole human genome has now been studied and this will have great importance for medicine in the future. Students should be able to discuss the importance of understanding the human genome. This is limited to the: • search for genes linked to different types of disease • understanding and treatment of inherited disorders • use in tracing human migration patterns from the past.
AQA new specification-Smoking and the risk of disease-B7.3
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AQA new specification-Smoking and the risk of disease-B7.3

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Smoking and the risk of disease lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video's, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link, i have also included practical instructions in the notes. AQA spec link: 4.2.2.6 Relevant chapter: B7 Non-communicable diseases. AQA Biology combined textbook-Page 104-105 Specification requires students to know the following; Risk factors are linked to an increased rate of a disease. They can be: •• aspects of a person’s lifestyle •• substances in the person’s body or environment. A causal mechanism has been proven for some risk factors, but not in others. •• The effect of alcohol on the liver and brain function. •• The effect of smoking on lung disease and lung cancer. •• The effects of smoking and alcohol on unborn babies. •• Carcinogens, including ionising radiation, as risk factors in cancer. Many diseases are caused by the interaction of a number of factors.
AQA new specification-Photosynthesis-B8.1
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AQA new specification-Photosynthesis-B8.1

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This lesson has been improved, it contains two lessons worth of content and now includes an optional practical activity Photosynthesis lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, optional practical and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.4.1.1 Relevant chapter: B8 Photosynthesis. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 124-125 Students are required to know the following; Photosynthesis is represented by the equation: carbon dioxide + water (light) glucose + oxygen Students should recognise the chemical symbols: CO2, H2O, O2 and C6H12O6. Students should be able to describe photosynthesis as an endothermic reaction in which energy is transferred from the environment to the chloroplasts by light.
AQA new specification-B2-Cell division-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B2-Cell division-Complete bundle

5 Resources
This bundle includes the B2 unit-Cell division. These resources have been designed for a higher ability class. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required) although URL link can be found in slide notes, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 25% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Cell division (mitosis) Lesson 2-Grown and differentiation Lesson 3-Stem cells (introduction) Lesson 4-Stem cell dilemmas Lesson 5-(optional) Cauliflower cloning practical.
AQA new specification-Diseases caused by fungi and protists-B5.8
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AQA new specification-Diseases caused by fungi and protists-B5.8

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This lesson has been created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my combined/additional science class (Year 9-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is suitable for separate science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.1.4 and 4.3.1.5 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 88-89. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Rose black spot is a fungal disease where purple or black spots develop on leaves, which often turn yellow and drop early. It affects the growth of the plant as photosynthesis is reduced. It is spread in the environment by water or wind. Rose black spot can be treated by using fungicides and/or removing and destroying the affected leaves. The pathogens that cause malaria are protists. The malarial protist has a life cycle that includes the mosquito. Malaria causes recurrent episodes of fever and can be fatal. The spread of malaria is controlled by preventing the vectors, mosquitos, from breeding and by using mosquito nets to avoid being bitten.
AQA new specification-Plant defence responses-B5.11
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AQA new specification-Plant defence responses-B5.11

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NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Plant defence responses lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions, answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.3.2 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 94-95. Students should be able to describe physical and chemical plant defence responses. Physical defence responses to resist invasion of microorganisms: • Cellulose cell walls. • Tough waxy cuticle on leaves. • Layers of dead cells around stems (bark on trees) which fall off. Chemical plant defence responses: • Antibacterial chemicals. • Poisons to deter herbivores. Mechanical adaptations: • Thorns and hairs deter animals. • Leaves which droop or curl when touched. • Mimicry to trick animals.
AQA new specification-Factors affecting food security, making food production efficient-B18.10-11
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AQA new specification-Factors affecting food security, making food production efficient-B18.10-11

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Please note that this resource contains two lessons worth of content. Factors affecting food security and making food production efficient lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, past paper questions, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.5; 1, 2, 3 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 304-307 Students are required to know the following; 7.5.1 Students should be able to describe some of the biological factors affecting levels of food security. Food security is having enough food to feed a population. Biological factors which are threatening food security include: • the increasing birth rate has threatened food security in some countries • changing diets in developed countries means scarce food resources are transported around the world • new pests and pathogens affect farming • environmental changes affect food production, such as widespread famine occurring in some countries if rains fail • cost of agricultural inputs • conflicts have arisen in some parts of the world over the availability of water or food. Sustainable methods must be found to feed all people on Earth. 7.5.2 The efficiency of food production can be improved by restricting energy transfer from food animals to the environment. This can be done by limiting their movement and by controlling the temperature of their surroundings. Some animals are fed high protein foods to increase growth. 7.5.3 Fish stocks in the oceans are declining. It is important to maintain fish stocks at a level where breeding continues or certain species may disappear altogether in some areas. Control of net size and the introduction of fishing quotas play important roles in conservation of fish stocks at a sustainable level.
AQA new specification-Cell division (mitosis)-B2.1
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AQA new specification-Cell division (mitosis)-B2.1

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Cell division (mitosis) lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and worksheet. AQA spec link: 4.1.2.1 & 4.1.2.2 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 26-27 Specification requires students to know the following; The nucleus of a cell contains chromosomes made of DNA molecules. Each chromosome carries a large number of genes. In body cells the chromosomes are normally found in pairs. Cells divide in a series of stages called the cell cycle. Students should be able to describe the stages of the cell cycle, including mitosis. During the cell cycle the genetic material is doubled and then divided into two identical cells. Before a cell can divide it needs to grow and increase the number of sub-cellular structures such as ribosomes and mitochondria. The DNA replicates to form two copies of each chromosome. In mitosis one set of chromosomes is pulled to each end of the cell and the nucleus divides. Finally the cytoplasm and cell membranes divide to form two identical cells. Students need to understand the three overall stages of the cell cycle but do not need to know the different phases of the mitosis stage. Cell division by mitosis is important in the growth and development of multi-cellular organisms. Students should be able to recognise and describe situations in given contexts where mitosis is occurring.
AQA new specification-B13 Reproduction bundle-Biology/separate science
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AQA new specification-B13 Reproduction bundle-Biology/separate science

11 Resources
Due to popular demand I have uploaded a B13 bundle. This bundle contains the content for BIOLOGY/SEPARATE science students. It includes all the resources you need to teach the B13 Reproduction topic. If you're teaching this topic (B12) to combined science students I've uploaded a separate bundle for it. Lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos embedded for ease of use, paper friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 42% by purchasing this bundle. Higher topics included. Total 11 lessons + Past paper question pack on mitosis and meiosis. L1 = types of reproduction L2 = cell division and sexual reproduction L3 = the best of both worlds L4 = DNA and the genome L5a = DNA structure L5b = protein synthesis L6 = gene expression and mutation L7 = inheritance in Action L8 = more about genetics L9 = inherited disorders L10 = screening for genetic disorders
AQA new specification-Stem cell dilemmas-B2.4
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AQA new specification-Stem cell dilemmas-B2.4

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Stem cells dilemmas lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded video, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 4.1.2.3 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 32-33 Specification requires students to know the following; In therapeutic cloning an embryo is produced with the same genes as the patient. Stem cells from the embryo are not rejected by the patient’s body so they may be used for medical treatment. The use of stem cells has potential risks such as transfer of viral infection, and some people have ethical or religious objections. Stem cells from meristems in plants can be used to produce clones of plants quickly and economically. •• Rare species can be cloned to protect from extinction. •• Crop plants with special features such as disease resistance can be cloned to produce large numbers of identical plants for farmers.
AQA new specification-The eye-B10.5
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AQA new specification-The eye-B10.5

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The eye lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability, separate science class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. THIS LESSON IS FOR BIOLOGY ONLY AQA spec link: 4.5.2.3 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 152-153 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to relate the structures of the eye to their functions. This includes: • accommodation to focus on near or distant objects • adaptation to dim light. The eye is a sense organ containing receptors sensitive to light intensity and colour Students should be able to identify the following structures on a diagram of the eye and explain how their structure is related to their function: •retina • optic nerve • sclera • cornea • iris • ciliary muscles • suspensory ligaments.
AQA new specification-Exchanging materials-B1.10
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AQA new specification-Exchanging materials-B1.10

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Exchanging materials lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet, and homework (with MS) AQA spec link: 4.1.3.1 Relevant chapter: B1 Cell structure and transport. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 22-23 Specification requires students to know the following; A single-celled organism has a relatively large surface area to volume ratio. This allows sufficient transport of molecules into and out of the cell to meet the needs of the organism. Students should be able to calculate and compare surface area to volume ratios. Students should be able to explain the need for exchange surfaces and a transport system in multicellular organisms in terms of surface area to volume ratio. Students should be able to explain how the small intestine and lungs in mammals, gills in fish, and the roots and leaves in plants, are adapted for exchanging materials. In multicellular organisms, surfaces and organ systems are specialised for exchanging materials. This is to allow sufficient molecules to be transported into and out of cells for the organism’s needs. The effectiveness of an exchange surface is increased by: •• having a large surface area •• a membrane that is thin, to provide a short diffusion path •• (in animals) having an efficient blood supply •• (in animals, for gaseous exchange) being ventilated.
AQA new specification-Accepting Darwin's ideas-B15.3
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AQA new specification-Accepting Darwin's ideas-B15.3

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Accepting Darwin’s ideas lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. **Please note the homework and markscheme from the lesson on theories of evolution (B15.2) has also been included in this resource. ** AQA spec link: 4.6.3.1 Relevant chapter: B15 Genetics and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 238-239 Students are required to know the following; Darwin published his ideas in On the Origin of Species (1859). There was much controversy surrounding these revolutionary new ideas. The theory of evolution by natural selection was only gradually accepted because: • the theory challenged the idea that God made all the animals and plants that live on Earth • there was insufficient evidence at the time the theory was published to convince many scientists • the mechanism of inheritance and variation was not known until 50 years after the theory was published.
AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6  PAST PAPER QUESTION
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AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6 PAST PAPER QUESTION

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I've uploaded a couple of past paper questions for the Hormones and menstrual cycle topic (B11.6). I've also included the mark scheme, which has been edited so that it is student friendly (mark schemes are quite difficult to interpret). Thought this might be useful as a review task that students can self/peer assess. This is a complimentary resource, if you wish to purchase i have also designed a lesson for this topic simply search ' AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6' Good luck with your lesson!