Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Professional practice

Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Professional practice

Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim D: Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work. How did i teach this? This assignment allows students to review the skills they attained in this unit. It also reiterates the importance of H&S as well as professional practice. Before setting the assignment i first taught three lessons covering the content in Pearson BTEC national-Applied science-Student book 1. Due to the complexity of this assignment i provided my students with a template which covered the P/M/D criteria (download the free template). This prevented students from going off on a tangent and also ensured they had mentioned the key skills for both assignment B and C. NB: Professional practice is the third lesson of the three. Worksheets attached and videos embedded for ease of use.
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Personal  responsibility

Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Personal responsibility

Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim D: Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work. How did i teach this? This assignment allows students to review the skills they attained in this unit. It also reiterates the importance of H&S as well as professional practice. Before setting the assignment i first taught three lessons covering the content in Pearson BTEC national-Applied science-Student book 1. Due to the complexity of this assignment i provided my students with a template which covered the P/M/D criteria (download the free template). This prevented students from going off on a tangent and also ensured they had mentioned the key skills for both assignment B and C. NB: Personal responsibility is the first of the three lessons. Worksheets attached and videos embedded for ease of use.
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Interpersonal skills

Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Interpersonal skills

Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim D: Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work. How did i teach this? This assignment allows students to review the skills they attained in this unit. It also reiterates the importance of H&S as well as professional practice. Before setting the assignment i first taught three lessons covering the content in Pearson BTEC national-Applied science-Student book 1. Due to the complexity of this assignment i provided my students with a template which covered the P/M/D criteria (download the free template). This prevented students from going off on a tangent and also ensured they had mentioned the key skills for both assignment B and C. NB: Interpersonal skills is the second lesson of the three lessons. Worksheets attached and videos embedded for ease of use.
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Pearson BTEC New specification-Applied science-Unit 1-C1 complete bundle

Pearson BTEC New specification-Applied science-Unit 1-C1 complete bundle

This bundle includes the BTEC Physics C1-unit for the new Pearson BTEC applied science specification. C1-Working with Waves. Everything you need to teach the C1 module has been included in this bundle. All lessons have been created in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 25% by purchasing this bundle. Lesson 1-Introduction to waves Lesson 2-Displacement and phase difference Lesson 3-Longitudinal and transverse waves Lesson 4-Diffraction gratings and path difference Lesson 5-Quantum physics-photon Lesson 6-Emission spectra Lesson 7-Stationary waves and resonance Lesson 8-Musical instruments
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AQA new specification-Vaccination-B6.1

AQA new specification-Vaccination-B6.1

Vaccination lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher tier class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 4.3.1.7 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating disease. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 98-99 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain how vaccination will prevent illness in an individual, and how the spread of pathogens can be reduced by immunising a large proportion of the population. Vaccination involves introducing small quantities of dead or inactive forms of a pathogen into the body to stimulate the white blood cells to produce antibodies. If the same pathogen re-enters the body the white blood cells respond quickly to produce the correct antibodies, preventing infection. Students do not need to know details of vaccination schedules and side effects associated with specific vaccines.
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AQA new specification-Distribution and abundance-B15.3

AQA new specification-Distribution and abundance-B15.3

Distribution and abundance lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.1 Relevant chapter: B15 Adaptations, interdependence and competitions. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 210-211 Students are required to know the following; A range of experimental methods using transects and quadrats are used by ecologists to determine the distribution and abundance of species in an ecosystem. In relation to abundance of organisms students should be able to: • understand the terms mean, mode and median •calculate arithmetic means
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AQA new specification-Screening genetic disorders-B13.10

AQA new specification-Screening genetic disorders-B13.10

NB-This resource has been edited since the last review* [30/9/17] Screening for genetic disorders lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability TRILOGY(combined science) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a quiz. This video contains many videos and is a great lesson to spark a debate. I'd appreciate a review after your lesson :) AQA spec link: 6.1.7 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 214-215. Some disorders are inherited. These disorders are caused by the inheritance of certain alleles. • Polydactyly (having extra fingers or toes) is caused by a dominant allele. • Cystic fibrosis (a disorder of cell membranes) is caused by a recessive allele. Students should make informed judgements about the economic, social and ethical issues concerning embryo screening, given appropriate information. WS 1.3 Appreciate that embryo screening and gene therapy may alleviate suffering but consider the ethical issues which arise.
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AQA new specification-Feeding relationships-B16.1

AQA new specification-Feeding relationships-B16.1

Feeding relationships lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.1 Relevant chapter: B16 organising an ecosystem. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 224-225 Students are required to know the following; Students should understand that photosynthetic organisms are the producers of biomass = for life on Earth. Feeding relationships within a community can be represented by food chains. All food chains begin with a producer which synthesises molecules. This is usually a green plant or alga which makes glucose by photosynthesis. Producers are eaten by primary consumers, which in turn may be eaten by secondary consumers and then tertiary consumers. Consumers that kill and eat other animals are predators, and those eaten are prey. In a stable community the numbers of predators and prey rise and fall in cycles. WS 1.2 Interpret graphs used to model predator-prey cycles. Students should be able to interpret graphs used to model these cycles.
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AQA new specification-The carbon cycle-B16.3

AQA new specification-The carbon cycle-B16.3

The carbon cycle lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.2 Relevant chapter: B16 organising an ecosystem. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 228-229 Students are required to know the following; Explain the importance of the carbon and water cycles to living organisms. All materials in the living world are recycled to provide the building blocks for future organisms. The carbon cycle returns carbon from organisms to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide to be used by plants in photosynthesis. The water cycle provides fresh water for plants and animals on land before draining into the seas. Water is continuously evaporated and precipitated. Students are not expected to study the nitrogen cycle. Students should be able to explain the role of microorganisms in cycling materials through an ecosystem by returning carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and mineral ions to the soil.
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AQA new specification-Material cycling-B16.2

AQA new specification-Material cycling-B16.2

Material cycling lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.2 Relevant chapter: B16 organising an ecosystem. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 226-227 Students are required to know the following; Explain the importance of the carbon and water cycles to living organisms. All materials in the living world are recycled to provide the building blocks for future organisms. The carbon cycle returns carbon from organisms to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide to be used by plants in photosynthesis. The water cycle provides fresh water for plants and animals on land before draining into the seas. Water is continuously evaporated and precipitated. Students are not expected to study the nitrogen cycle. Students should be able to explain the role of microorganisms in cycling materials through an ecosystem by returning carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and mineral ions to the soil.
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AQA new specification-Rates of decomposition-B17.4

AQA new specification-Rates of decomposition-B17.4

Rates of decomposition lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separate class only, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Required practical has been taught in a separate lesson. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.3 Relevant chapter: B17 organising an ecosystem. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 282-283 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain how temperature, water and availability of oxygen affect the rate of decay of biological material. Students should be able to: • calculate rate changes in the decay of biological material Gardeners and farmers try to provide optimum conditions for rapid decay of waste biological material. The compost produced is used as a natural fertiliser for growing garden plants or crops. Anaerobic decay produces methane gas. Biogas generators can be used to produce methane gas as a fuel.
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AQA new specification-DNA structure and protein synthesis-B13.5

AQA new specification-DNA structure and protein synthesis-B13.5

DNA structure and protein synthesis lessons created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). NB: BIOLOGY ONLY. I taught this topic in two lessons as it's a topic that's a difficult concept and can be taught effectively as opposed to being rushed. This resource is designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheets and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.5 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 204-205. Students should be able to describe DNA as a polymer made from four different nucleotides. Each nucleotide consists of a common sugar and phosphate group with one of four different bases attached to the sugar. DNA contains four bases, A, C, G and T. A sequence of three bases is the code for a particular amino acid. The order of bases controls the order in which amino acids are assembled to produce a particular protein. The long strands of DNA consist of alternating sugar and phosphate sections. Attached to each sugar is one of the four bases. The DNA polymer is made up of repeating nucleotide units. (HT only) Students should be able to: •• recall a simple description of protein synthesis •• explain simply how the structure of DNA affects the protein made •• describe how genetic variants may influence phenotype: a) in coding DNA by altering the activity of a protein: and b) in non-coding DNA by altering how genes are expressed. (HT only) In the complementary strands a C is always linked to a G on the opposite strand and a T to an A. (HT only) Students are not expected to know or understand the structure of mRNA, tRNA, or the detailed structure of amino acids or proteins. (HT only) Students should be able to explain how a change in DNA structure may result in a change in the protein synthesised by a gene. (HT only) Proteins are synthesised on ribosomes, according to atemplate. Carrier molecules bring specific amino acids to add to the growing protein chain in the correct order. (HT only) When the protein chain is complete it folds up to form a unique shape. This unique shape enables the proteins to do their job as enzymes, hormones or forming structures in the body such as collagen.
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AQA new specification-Principles of homeostasis-B10.1

AQA new specification-Principles of homeostasis-B10.1

Principles of homeostasis lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.5.1 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 133-134 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain that homeostasis is the regulation of the internal conditions of a cell or organism to maintain optimum conditions for function in response to internal and external changes. Homeostasis maintains optimal conditions for enzyme action and all cell functions. In the human body, these include control of: • blood glucose concentration • body temperature • water levels. These automatic control systems may involve nervous responses or chemical responses. All control systems include: • cells called receptors, which detect stimuli (changes in theenvironment) • coordination centres (such as the brain, spinal cord and pancreas) that receive and process information from receptors • effectors, muscles or glands, which bring about responses which restore optimum levels.
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AQA new specification-The carbon cycle-B17.3

AQA new specification-The carbon cycle-B17.3

The carbon cycle lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.2 Relevant chapter: B17 organising an ecosystem. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 280-281 Students are required to know the following; Explain the importance of the carbon and water cycles to living organisms. All materials in the living world are recycled to provide the building blocks for future organisms. The carbon cycle returns carbon from organisms to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide to be used by plants in photosynthesis. The water cycle provides fresh water for plants and animals on land before draining into the seas. Water is continuously evaporated and precipitated. Students are not expected to study the nitrogen cycle. Students should be able to explain the role of microorganisms in cycling materials through an ecosystem by returning carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and mineral ions to the soil.
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AQA new specification-Material cycling-B17.2

AQA new specification-Material cycling-B17.2

Material cycling lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.2 Relevant chapter: B17 organising an ecosystem. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 278-279 Students are required to know the following; Explain the importance of the carbon and water cycles to living organisms. All materials in the living world are recycled to provide the building blocks for future organisms. The carbon cycle returns carbon from organisms to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide to be used by plants in photosynthesis. The water cycle provides fresh water for plants and animals on land before draining into the seas. Water is continuously evaporated and precipitated. Students are not expected to study the nitrogen cycle. Students should be able to explain the role of microorganisms in cycling materials through an ecosystem by returning carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and mineral ions to the soil.
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AQA new specification-B16 Organising an ecosystem-Combined/Additional science bundle

AQA new specification-B16 Organising an ecosystem-Combined/Additional science bundle

This bundle only contains the content for COMBINED/ADDITIONAL science students. It includes the B16 unit-Organising an ecosystem. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 25% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 3 lessons These lessons are suitable to teach separate science but they have 1 extra topic to learn. Lesson 1-Feeding relationships Lesson 2-Material cycling Lesson 3-The carbon cycle Good luck with your lessons :)
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AQA new specification-Feeding relationships-B17.1

AQA new specification-Feeding relationships-B17.1

Feeding relationships lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.1 Relevant chapter: B17 organising an ecosystem. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 276-277 Students are required to know the following; Students should understand that photosynthetic organisms are the producers of biomass = for life on Earth. Feeding relationships within a community can be represented by food chains. All food chains begin with a producer which synthesises molecules. This is usually a green plant or alga which makes glucose by photosynthesis. Producers are eaten by primary consumers, which in turn may be eaten by secondary consumers and then tertiary consumers. Consumers that kill and eat other animals are predators, and those eaten are prey. In a stable community the numbers of predators and prey rise and fall in cycles. WS 1.2 Interpret graphs used to model predator-prey cycles. Students should be able to interpret graphs used to model these cycles.
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AQA new specification-Antibiotic resistant bacteria-B15.4

AQA new specification-Antibiotic resistant bacteria-B15.4

Antibiotic resistant bacteria lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.3.7 Relevant chapter: B15 Genetics and evolution. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 248-249 Students are required to know the following; Bacteria can evolve rapidly because they reproduce at a fast rate. Mutations of bacterial pathogens produce new strains. Some strains might be resistant to antibiotics, and so are not killed. They survive and reproduce, so the population of the resistant strain rises. The resistant strain will then spread because people are not immune to it and there is no effective treatment. MRSA is resistant to antibiotics. To reduce the rate of development of antibiotic resistant strains: • doctors should not prescribe antibiotics inappropriately, such as treating non-serious or viral infections • patients should complete their course of antibiotics so all bacteria are killed and none survive to mutate and form resistant strains •the agricultural use of antibiotics should be restricted. The development of new antibiotics is costly and slow. It is unlikely to keep up with the emergence of new resistant strains.
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AQA new specification-B13 Reproduction bundle-Biology/separate science

AQA new specification-B13 Reproduction bundle-Biology/separate science

Due to popular demand I have uploaded a B13 bundle. This bundle contains the content for BIOLOGY/SEPARATE science students. It includes all the resources you need to teach the B13 Reproduction topic. If you're teaching this topic (B12) to combined science students I've uploaded a separate bundle for it. Lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos embedded for ease of use, paper friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 42% by purchasing this bundle. Higher topics included. Total 11 lessons + Past paper question pack on mitosis and meiosis. L1 = types of reproduction L2 = cell division and sexual reproduction L3 = the best of both worlds L4 = DNA and the genome L5a = DNA structure L5b = protein synthesis L6 = gene expression and mutation L7 = inheritance in Action L8 = more about genetics L9 = inherited disorders L10 = screening for genetic disorders
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AQA new specification-B3 Organisation and the digestive system -Complete bundle

AQA new specification-B3 Organisation and the digestive system -Complete bundle

This bundle includes the B3 unit-Organisation and the digestive system. This bundle is suitable for both combined and separate science students. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required although URL has also been provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 22% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Tissues and organs Lesson 2-The human digestive system Lesson 3-The chemistry of food Lesson 4-RP 4-Food tests Lesson 5-Catalysts and enzymes Lesson 6-Factors affecting enzyme action Lesson 7-How the digestive system works Lesson 8-RP 5-Enzymes Lesson 9-Making digestion efficient
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AQA new specification-The human Kidney-B12.3

AQA new specification-The human Kidney-B12.3

The human Kidney lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). This is a printer friendly resource it includes an: embedded video, slide animations and a mini exam question. As i taught this lesson in two parts it's only fair i upload the other presentation also (2 for the price of 1). **Knowledge of other parts of the urinary system, the structure of the kidney, and the structure of a nephron is not required.** AQA spec link: 5.3.3 Relevant chapter: B12-Homeostasis in action. ( Note: This topic is for BIOLOGY only not for combined science students). AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 185-186 *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the function of kidneys in maintaining the water balance of the body. The kidneys produce urine by filtration of the blood and selective reabsorption of useful substances such as glucose, some ions, And water. Knowledge of other parts of the urinary system, the structure of the kidney, and the structure of a nephron is not required. Students should be able to translate tables and bar charts of glucose, ions, and urea before and after filtration. Students should be able to describe the effect of ADH on the permeability of the kidney tubules. The water level in the body is controlled by the hormone ADH which acts on the kidney tubules. ADH is released by the pituitary gland when the blood is too concentrated and it causes more water to be reabsorbed back into the blood from the kidney tubules. This is controlled by negative feedback.
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