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Paperfriendlyresourcesuk New Resources Coming soon! PFR resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet.

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Paperfriendlyresourcesuk New Resources Coming soon! PFR resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet.
AQA new specification-Principles of homeostasis-B10.1
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AQA new specification-Principles of homeostasis-B10.1

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Principles of homeostasis lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.5.1 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology combined edition textbook-Page 133-134 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain that homeostasis is the regulation of the internal conditions of a cell or organism to maintain optimum conditions for function in response to internal and external changes. Homeostasis maintains optimal conditions for enzyme action and all cell functions. In the human body, these include control of: • blood glucose concentration • body temperature • water levels. These automatic control systems may involve nervous responses or chemical responses. All control systems include: • cells called receptors, which detect stimuli (changes in theenvironment) • coordination centres (such as the brain, spinal cord and pancreas) that receive and process information from receptors • effectors, muscles or glands, which bring about responses which restore optimum levels.
AQA new specification-Growing bacteria in the lab-B5.3
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AQA new specification-Growing bacteria in the lab-B5.3

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NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Growing bacteria in the lab lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.6 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 78-79. Bacteria multiply by simple cell division (binary fission) as often as once every 20 minutes if they have enough nutrients and a suitable temperature. Bacteria can be grown in a nutrient broth solution or as colonies on an agar gel plate. Uncontaminated cultures of microorganisms are required for investigating the action of disinfectants and antibiotics. Students should be able to describe how to prepare an uncontaminated culture using aseptic technique. They should be able to explain why: • Petri dishes and culture media must be sterilised before use to kill unwanted microorganisms • inoculating loops used to transfer microorganisms to the media must be sterilised by passing them through a flame • the lid of the Petri dish should be secured with adhesive tape to prevent microorganisms from the air contaminating the culture, and stored upside down • in school and college laboratories, cultures should be incubated at a maximum temperature of 25 °C.
AQA new specification-Inheritance in action-B13.7
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AQA new specification-Inheritance in action-B13.7

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Inheritance in action lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.6 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 208-209. Students should be able to explain the terms: • gamete • chromosome • gene • allele • dominant • recessive • homozygous • heterozygous • genotype • phenotype. Some characteristics are controlled by a single gene, such as: fur colour in mice; and red-green colour blindness in humans. Each gene may have different forms called alleles. The alleles present, or genotype, operate at a molecular level to develop characteristics that can be expressed as a phenotype. A dominant allele is always expressed, even if only one copy is present. A recessive allele is only expressed if two copies are present (therefore no dominant allele present). If the two alleles present are the same the organism is homozygous for that trait, but if the alleles are different they are heterozygous. Most characteristics are a result of multiple genes interacting, rather than a single gene. Students should be able to understand the concept of probability in predicting the results of a single gene cross, but recall that most phenotype features are the result of multiple genes rather than single gene inheritance. MS 2e Students should be able to use direct proportion and simple ratios to express the outcome of a genetic cross. MS 1c, 3a Students should be able to complete a Punnett square diagram and extract and interpret information from genetic crosses and family trees. MS 2c, 4a (HT only) Students should be able to construct a genetic cross by Punnett square diagram and use it to make predictions using the theory of probability.
AQA new specification-The brain-B10.4
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AQA new specification-The brain-B10.4

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The brain lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability, separate science class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. THIS LESSON IS FOR BIOLOGY ONLY AQA spec link: 4.5.2.2 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 152-153 Students are required to know the following; The brain controls complex behaviour. It is made of billions of interconnected neurones and has different regions that carry out different functions. Students should be able to identify the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and medulla on a diagram of the brain, and describe their functions. (HT only) Students should be able to explain some of the difficulties of investigating brain function and treating brain damage and disease. (HT only) Neuroscientists have been able to map the regions of the brain to particular functions by studying patients with brain damage, electrically stimulating different parts of the brain and using MRI scanning techniques. The complexity and delicacy of the brain makes investigating and treating brain disorders very difficult.
AQA new specification-The role of negative feedback-B11.4
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AQA new specification-The role of negative feedback-B11.4

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The role of negative feedback lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). This content is for HIGHER TIER only. Includes: slide animations, embedded video, practice exam question with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. May needed to be edited for foundation students. AQA spec link: 5.3.7 Relevant chapter: B11 Hormonal coordination. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 166-167. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the roles of thyroxine and adrenaline in the body. Adrenaline is produced by the adrenal glands in times of fear or stress. It increases the heart rate and boosts the delivery of oxygen and glucose to the brain and muscles, preparing the body for ‘flight or fight’. Thyroxine from the thyroid gland stimulates the basal metabolic rate. It plays an important role in growth and development. Thyroxine levels are controlled by negative feedback.
AQA new specification-The importance of communities-B16.1
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AQA new specification-The importance of communities-B16.1

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The importance of communities lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.1.1 Relevant chapter: B16 Adaptations, interdependence and competitions. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 258-259 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe: •different levels of organisation in an ecosystem from individual organisms to the whole ecosystem • the importance of interdependence and competition in a community. An ecosystem is the interaction of a community of living organisms (biotic) with the non-living (abiotic) parts of their environment. To survive and reproduce, organisms require a supply of materials from their surroundings and from the other living organisms there. Plants in a community or habitat often compete with each other for light and space, and for water and mineral ions from the soil. Animals often compete with each other for food, mates and territory. Within a community each species depends on other species for food, shelter, pollination, seed dispersal etc. If one species is removed it can affect the whole community. This is called interdependence. A stable community is one where all the species and environmental factors are in balance so that population sizes remain fairly constant.
AQA new specification-Plant defence responses-B5.11
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AQA new specification-Plant defence responses-B5.11

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NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Plant defence responses lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions, answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.3.2 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 94-95. Students should be able to describe physical and chemical plant defence responses. Physical defence responses to resist invasion of microorganisms: • Cellulose cell walls. • Tough waxy cuticle on leaves. • Layers of dead cells around stems (bark on trees) which fall off. Chemical plant defence responses: • Antibacterial chemicals. • Poisons to deter herbivores. Mechanical adaptations: • Thorns and hairs deter animals. • Leaves which droop or curl when touched. • Mimicry to trick animals.
AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 8-Germination-B11.9
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AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 8-Germination-B11.9

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Germination Practical (RP 8). This practical was completed in 2 lessons. Students are required to collect data outside of lesson time. I’ve attached both lessons, mock data (lesson 2) and a sign in sheet so you can create your own groups and student rota. Good luck! Lesson 1: Demo provided, students set up their practical, three conditions were created; full light-by windowsill, partial light-underneath windowsill and darkness-cupboard. The remainder of the lesson was spent discussing how to collect data, the student rota was explained. Students also used this time to assign roles to one another. Opportunity to collect data at break/lunch over 7 days (excluding weekends). Lesson 2: Interpreting data, working out averages, plotting graph, biological drawings. Conclusion and evaluation of practical was given as homework. Overall, this practical was very easy to set up but very fiddly to organise. Students need to take active approach as this practical needs to be done over 7 consecutive days, ownership to students. Mustard seeds were quick to germinate but were very poor at demonstrating phototropism. I would probably use coriander seeds next time. Also in the dark condition shoots grew very long, this confused students as light was absent (due to Etiolation), to complex for GCSE students to comprehend. Spec ref: 5.4.1 Required practical: Investigate the effect of light or gravity on the growth of newly germinated seedlings. Record results as both length measurements and as careful, labelled biological drawings to show the effects.
AQA new specification-Evolution and speciation-B15.4
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AQA new specification-Evolution and speciation-B15.4

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Evolution and speciation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.3.2 Relevant chapter: B15 Genetics and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 240-241 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to: • describe the work of Darwin and Wallace in the development of the theory of evolution by natural selection • explain the impact of these ideas on biology. Alfred Russel Wallace independently proposed the theory of evolution by natural selection. He published joint writings with Darwin in 1858 which prompted Darwin to publish On the Origin of Species (1859) the following year. Wallace worked worldwide gathering evidence for evolutionary theory. He is best known for his work on warning colouration in animals and his theory of speciation. Alfred Wallace did much pioneering work on speciation but more evidence over time has led to our current understanding of the theory of speciation. Students should be able to describe the steps which give rise to new species. WS 1.1 The theory of speciation has developed over time
AQA new specification-The human population explosion-B18.1
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AQA new specification-The human population explosion-B18.1

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The human population explosion lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Students are expected to demonstrate their graph skills this lesson as well as interpret data. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, questions with markscheme and embedded video’s and mini review. ***Paper friendly tips: Avoid printing the markscheme provided, unless required, an interactive markscheme has been included in the powerpoint. Print two worksheets to one page to save paper. Instruct able students to copy out the table on slide 14 . NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.3.1; 3.2; 3.3 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 286-287 Students are required to know the following; Biodiversity is the variety of all the different species of organisms on earth, or within an ecosystem. A great biodiversity ensures the stability of ecosystems due to the interdependencies of one species on another for food, shelter, and the maintenance of the physical environment. The future of the human species on Earth relies on us maintaining a good level of biodiversity. Many human activities are reducing biodiversity and only recently have measures been taken to try to stop this reduction. Rapid growth in the human population and an increase in the standard of living mean that increasingly more resources are used and more waste is produced. Unless waste and chemical materials are properly handled, more pollution will be caused. Humans reduce the amount of land available for other animals and plants by building, quarrying, farming, and dumping waste.
AQA new specification-Diet, exercise and disease-B7.4
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AQA new specification-Diet, exercise and disease-B7.4

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Diet, exercise and disease lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video's, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.2.2.6 Relevant chapter: B7 Non-communicable diseases. AQA Biology combined textbook-Page 104-105 Students are required to know the following; • discuss the human and financial cost of these non-communicable diseases to an individual, a local community, a nation, or globally • explain the effect of lifestyle factors including diet, alcohol, and smoking on the incidence of non-communicable diseases at local, national, and global levels. Risk factors are linked to an increased rate of a disease. They can be: • aspects of a person’s lifestyle • substances in the person’s body or environment. A causal mechanism has been proven for some risk factors, but not in others. • The effects of diet and exercise on cardiovascular disease. • Obesity as a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. Many diseases are caused by the interaction of a number of factors. Students should be able to understand the principles of sampling as applied to scientific data in terms of risk factors. Students should be able to translate information between graphical and numerical forms; and extract and interpret information from charts, graphs and tables in terms of risk factors. Students should be able to use a scatter diagram to identify a correlation between two variables in terms of risk factors.
AQA new specification-Rates of decomposition-B17.4
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AQA new specification-Rates of decomposition-B17.4

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Rates of decomposition lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separate class only, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Required practical has been taught in a separate lesson. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.7.2.3 Relevant chapter: B17 organising an ecosystem. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 282-283 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain how temperature, water and availability of oxygen affect the rate of decay of biological material. Students should be able to: • calculate rate changes in the decay of biological material Gardeners and farmers try to provide optimum conditions for rapid decay of waste biological material. The compost produced is used as a natural fertiliser for growing garden plants or crops. Anaerobic decay produces methane gas. Biogas generators can be used to produce methane gas as a fuel.
AQA new specification-B12-Homeostasis in action-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B12-Homeostasis in action-Complete bundle

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This bundle includes the B12 unit-Homeostasis in action. This is a separates/biology ONLY unit. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 33% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Controlling body temperature Lesson 2-Removing waste products Lesson 3-The human kidney (taught this over 2 lessons, both included in this resource pack). Lesson 4-Dialysis-artificial kidney Lesson 5-Kidney transplants
AQA new specification-Genetic engineering B13.4
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AQA new specification-Genetic engineering B13.4

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Genetic engineering lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability (trilogy/combined) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.2.4 Relevant chapter: B13 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 184-185. Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe genetic engineering as a process which involves modifying the genome of an organism by introducing a gene from another organism to give a desired characteristic. Plant crops have been genetically engineered to be resistant to diseases or to produce bigger better fruits. Bacterial cells have been genetically engineered to produce useful substances such as human insulin to treat diabetes. Students should be able to explain the potential benefits and risks of genetic engineering in agriculture and in medicine and that some people have objections. In genetic engineering, genes from the chromosomes of humans and other organisms can be ‘cut out’ and transferred to cells of other organisms. Crops that have had their genes modified in this way are called genetically modified (GM) crops. GM crops include ones that are resistant to insect attack or to herbicides. GM crops generally show increased yields. Concerns about GM crops include the effect on populations of wild flowers and insects. Some people feel the effects of eating GM crops on human health have not been fully explored. Modern medical research is exploring the possibility of genetic modification to overcome some inherited disorders. (HT) Students should be able to describe the main steps in the process of genetic engineering. In genetic engineering: • enzymes are used to isolate the required gene; this gene is inserted into a vector, usually a bacterial plasmid or a virus • the vector is used to insert the gene into the required cells • genes are transferred to the cells of animals, plants, or microorganisms at an early stage (egg or embryo) in their development so that they develop with desired characteristics.
AQA new specification-Greenhouse gases-C13.3
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AQA new specification-Greenhouse gases-C13.3

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Greenhouse gases lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.2.1, 2, Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere maintain temperatures on Earth high enough to support life. Water vapour, carbon dioxide, and methane are greenhouse gases. Students should be able to describe the greenhouse effect in terms of the interaction of short and long wavelength radiation with matter. Some human activities increase the amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These include: • carbon dioxide • methane. Students should be able to recall two human activities that increase the amounts of each of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane. Based on peer-reviewed evidence, many scientists believe that human activities will cause the temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere to increase at the surface and that this will result in global climate change. However, it is difficult to model such complex systems as global climate change. This leads to simplified models, speculation, and opinions presented in the media that may be based on only parts of the evidence and which may be biased. Students should be able to: • evaluate the quality of evidence in a report about global climate change given appropriate information • describe uncertainties in the evidence base • recognise the importance of peer review of results and of communicating results to a wide range of audiences.
AQA new specification-Sustainable food production-B18.12
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AQA new specification-Sustainable food production-B18.12

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Sustainable food production lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, past paper questions, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.5; 3, 4 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 308-309 Students are required to know the following; Fish stocks in the oceans are declining. It is important to maintain fish stocks at a level where breeding continues or certain species may disappear altogether in some areas. Control of net size and the introduction of fishing quotas play important roles in conservation of fish stocks at a sustainable level. Students should be able to describe and explain some possible biotechnical and agricultural solutions, including genetic modification, to the demands of the growing human population. Modern biotechnology techniques enable large quantities of microorganisms to be cultured for food. The fungus Fusarium is useful for producing mycoprotein, a protein-rich food suitable for vegetarians. The fungus is grown on glucose syrup, in aerobic conditions, and the biomass is harvested and purified. A genetically modified bacterium produces human insulin. When harvested and purified this is used to treat people with diabetes. GM crops could provide more food or food with an improved nutritional value such as golden rice.
AQA new specification-Evolution by natural selection-B14.2
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AQA new specification-Evolution by natural selection-B14.2

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Evolution by natural selection lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.2.1 + 4.6.2.2 Relevant chapter: B14 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 220-221. Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to: • state that there is usually extensive genetic variation within a population of a species • recall that all variants arise from mutations and that: most have no effect on the phenotype; some influence phenotype; very few determine phenotype. Mutations occur continuously. Very rarely a mutation will lead to a new phenotype. If the new phenotype is suited to an environmental change it can lead to a relatively rapid change in the species. Students should be able to describe evolution as a change in the inherited characteristics of a population over time through a process of natural selection which may result in the formation of a new species. The theory of evolution by natural selection states that all species of living things have evolved from simple life forms that first developed more than three billion years ago. Students should be able to explain how evolution occurs through natural selection of variants that give rise to phenotypes best suited to their environment. If two populations of one species become so different in phenotype that they can no longer interbreed to produce fertile offspring they have formed two new species.
AQA new specification-History of the atmosphere-C13.1
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AQA new specification-History of the atmosphere-C13.1

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-History of our atmoshphere lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.1.2, 3 Theories about what was in the Earth’s early atmosphere and how the atmosphere was formed have changed and developed over time. Evidence for the early atmosphere is limited because of the time scale of 4.6 billion years. One theory suggests that during the first billion years of the Earth’s existence there was intense volcanic activity that released gases that formed the early atmosphere and water vapour that condensed to form the oceans. At the start of this period the Earth’s atmosphere may have been like the atmospheres of Mars and Venus today, consisting of mainly carbon dioxide with little or no oxygen gas. Volcanoes also produced nitrogen which gradually built up in the atmosphere and there may have been small proportions of methane and ammonia. When the oceans formed carbon dioxide dissolved in the water and carbonates were precipitated producing sediments, reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. No knowledge of other theories is required. Students should be able to, given appropriate information, interpret evidence and evaluate different theories about the Earth’s early atmosphere. 9.1.3 Algae and plants produced the oxygen that is now in the atmosphere by photosynthesis, which can be represented by the equation: 6CO2 + 6H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2 carbon dioxide + water glucose + oxygen Algae first produced oxygen about 2.7 billion years ago and soon after this oxygen appeared in the atmosphere. Over the next billion years plants evolved and the percentage of oxygen gradually increased to a level that enabled animals to evolve.
AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 1-Microscopy-B1
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AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 1-Microscopy-B1

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To use a light microscope to observe, draw and label a selection of plant and animal cells. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.5 Relevant chapter: B1 Cells and organisation. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 4-5 In doing this practical students should cover these parts of the apparatus and techniques requirements. Biology AT 1 – use appropriate apparatus to record length and area. Biology AT 7 – use a microscope to make observations of biological specimens and produce labelled scientific drawings
AQA new specification-Development of the periodic table-C2.1
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AQA new specification-Development of the periodic table-C2.1

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C2-Development of the periodic table homework created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). This is a great flip learning activity, give yourself a little break and allow your students to present their timelines/fact sheets :) For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com Also available via instagram: Paperfriendlyresourcesuk AQA spec link: 4.1.2.2