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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-Atmospheric pollutants-C13.5
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AQA new specification-Atmospheric pollutants-C13.5

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Atmospheric pollutants lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.3.1, 2
AQA new specification-Global-climate-change-C13.4
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AQA new specification-Global-climate-change-C13.4

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Global climate change lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.2.3,4
AQA new specification-Greenhouse gases-C13.3
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AQA new specification-Greenhouse gases-C13.3

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Greenhouse gases lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.2.1, 2, Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere maintain temperatures on Earth high enough to support life. Water vapour, carbon dioxide, and methane are greenhouse gases. Students should be able to describe the greenhouse effect in terms of the interaction of short and long wavelength radiation with matter. Some human activities increase the amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These include: • carbon dioxide • methane. Students should be able to recall two human activities that increase the amounts of each of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane. Based on peer-reviewed evidence, many scientists believe that human activities will cause the temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere to increase at the surface and that this will result in global climate change. However, it is difficult to model such complex systems as global climate change. This leads to simplified models, speculation, and opinions presented in the media that may be based on only parts of the evidence and which may be biased. Students should be able to: • evaluate the quality of evidence in a report about global climate change given appropriate information • describe uncertainties in the evidence base • recognise the importance of peer review of results and of communicating results to a wide range of audiences.
AQA new specification-Our evolving atmosphere-C13.2
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AQA new specification-Our evolving atmosphere-C13.2

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Our evolving atmosphere lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.1.1, 2, 4 AQA spec link: For 200 million years, the proportions of different gases in the atmosphere have been much the same as they are today: • about four-fifths (approximately 80%) nitrogen • about one-fifth (approximately 20%) oxygen • small proportions of various other gases, including carbon dioxide, water vapour, and noble gases. Volcanoes also produced nitrogen which gradually built up in the atmosphere and there may have been small proportions of methane and ammonia. Algae and plants decreased the percentage of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by photosynthesis. Carbon dioxide was also decreased by the formation of sedimentary rocks and fossil fuels that contain carbon. Students should be able to: • describe the main changes in the atmosphere over time and some of the likely causes of these changes • describe and explain the formation of deposits of limestone, coal, crude oil, and natural gas.
AQA new specification-History of the atmosphere-C13.1
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AQA new specification-History of the atmosphere-C13.1

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-History of our atmoshphere lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.1.2, 3 Theories about what was in the Earth’s early atmosphere and how the atmosphere was formed have changed and developed over time. Evidence for the early atmosphere is limited because of the time scale of 4.6 billion years. One theory suggests that during the first billion years of the Earth’s existence there was intense volcanic activity that released gases that formed the early atmosphere and water vapour that condensed to form the oceans. At the start of this period the Earth’s atmosphere may have been like the atmospheres of Mars and Venus today, consisting of mainly carbon dioxide with little or no oxygen gas. Volcanoes also produced nitrogen which gradually built up in the atmosphere and there may have been small proportions of methane and ammonia. When the oceans formed carbon dioxide dissolved in the water and carbonates were precipitated producing sediments, reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. No knowledge of other theories is required. Students should be able to, given appropriate information, interpret evidence and evaluate different theories about the Earth’s early atmosphere. 9.1.3 Algae and plants produced the oxygen that is now in the atmosphere by photosynthesis, which can be represented by the equation: 6CO2 + 6H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2 carbon dioxide + water glucose + oxygen Algae first produced oxygen about 2.7 billion years ago and soon after this oxygen appeared in the atmosphere. Over the next billion years plants evolved and the percentage of oxygen gradually increased to a level that enabled animals to evolve.
AQA new specification-C9 Crude oil and fuels-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-C9 Crude oil and fuels-Complete bundle

4 Resources
This bundle includes the C9 unit-Crude oil and fuels. This bundle is suitable for both combined and separate science students. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required although URL has also been provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 22% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Hydrocarbons Lesson 2-Fractional distillation Lesson 3-Practical-Fractional distillation Lesson 4-Burning hydrocarbon fuels Lesson 4-Cracking hydrocarbons
AQA new specification-Cracking-hydrocarbons-C9.4
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AQA new specification-Cracking-hydrocarbons-C9.4

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C9-Organic chemistry-Cracking hydrocarbons created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. P.S if you have a double lesson with your class I recommend you allow the class to perform the bromine test and demo the cracking experiment to consolidate learning. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.7.1.4 Hydrocarbons can be broken down (cracked) to produce smaller, more useful molecules. Cracking can be done by various methods including catalytic cracking and steam cracking. Students should be able to describe in general terms the conditions used for catalytic cracking and steam cracking. The products of cracking include alkanes and another type of hydrocarbon called alkenes. Alkenes are more reactive than alkanes and react with bromine water, which is used as a test for alkenes. Students should be able to recall the colour change when bromine water reacts with an alkene. There is a high demand for fuels with small molecules and so some of the products of cracking are useful as fuels. Alkenes are used to produce polymers and as starting materials for the production of many other chemicals. Students should be able to balance chemical equations as examples of cracking given the formulae of the reactants and products. Students should be able to give examples to illustrate the usefulness of cracking. They should also be able to explain how modern life depends on the uses of hydrocarbons. (For Combined Science: Trilogy and Synergy students do not need to know the formulae or names of individual alkenes.) WS 1.2
AQA new specification-Burning hydrocarbon fuels-C9.3
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AQA new specification-Burning hydrocarbon fuels-C9.3

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C9-Organic chemistry-Burning hydrocarbon fuels created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, practical demo, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.7.1.3 The combustion of hydrocarbon fuels releases energy. During combustion, the carbon and hydrogen in the fuels are oxidised. The complete combustion of a hydrocarbon produces carbon dioxide and water. Students should be able to write balanced equations for the complete combustion of hydrocarbons with a given formula.
AQA new specification-Fractional distillation of oil-C9.2
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AQA new specification-Fractional distillation of oil-C9.2

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Please note two lessons worth of content are attached to this resource. C9-Organic chemistry-Fractional distillation of oil lessons created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, practical lesson, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. Top tip-To make the most out of this resource teach within a double period. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.7.1.2 The many hydrocarbons in crude oil may be separated into fractions, each of which contains molecules with a similar number of carbon atoms, by fractional distillation. The fractions can be processed to produce fuels and feedstock for the petrochemical industry. Many of the fuels on which we depend for our modern lifestyle, such as petrol, diesel oil, kerosene, heavy fuel oil and liquefied petroleum gases, are produced from crude oil. Many useful materials on which modern life depends are produced by the petrochemical industry, such as solvents, lubricants, polymers, detergents. The vast array of natural and synthetic carbon compounds occur due to the ability of carbon atoms to form families of similar compounds. Students should be able to explain how fractional distillation works in terms of evaporation and condensation. Knowledge of the names of other specific fractions or fuels is not required.
AQA new specification-B6 Preventing and treating disease- Separate science bundlE
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AQA new specification-B6 Preventing and treating disease- Separate science bundlE

6 Resources
This bundle contains the content for SEPARATE science students. This bundle includes the B6 unit-Preventing and treating disease. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required except for a BBC-drug trials video-URL provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 20% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Vaccination Lesson 2-Antibiotics and painkillers (L1) (taught this over 2 lessons, both included in this resource pack). Lesson 3-Antibiotics and painkillers (L2) Lesson 4-Discovering drugs Lesson 5-Developing drugs Lesson 6-Making monoclonal antibodies Lesson 7-Uses of monoclonal antibodies
AQA new specification-Uses of monoclonal antibodies-B6.6
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AQA new specification-Uses of monoclonal antibodies-B6.6

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Uses of monoclonal antibodies lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability SEPARATE (trilogy) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos,questions with answers on slides and homework, with mark scheme. NB: This resource is for separate science only AQA spec link: 4.3.2.2 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating diseases. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 107-109 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe some of the ways in which monoclonal antibodies can be used. •To treat some diseases: for cancer the monoclonal antibody can be bound to a radioactive substance, a toxic drug or a chemical which stops cells growing and dividing. It delivers the substance to the cancer cells without harming other cells in the body. Students are not expected to recall any specific tests or treatments but given appropriate information they should be able to explain how they work. Monoclonal antibodies create more side effects than expected. They are not yet as widely used as everyone hoped when they were first developed.
AQA new specification-Making monoclonal antibodies-B6.5
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AQA new specification-Making monoclonal antibodies-B6.5

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Making monoclonal antibodies lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability SEPARATE (trilogy) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides. NB: This resource is for separate science only AQA spec link: 4.3.2.1 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating diseases. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 106-107 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe how monoclonal antibodies are produced. Monoclonal antibodies are produced from a single clone of cells. The antibodies are specific to one binding site on one protein antigen and so are able to target a specific chemical or specific cells in the body. They are produced by stimulating mouse lymphocytes to make a particular antibody. The lymphocytes are combined with a particular kind of tumour cell to make a cell called a hybridoma cell. The hybridoma cell can both divide and make the antibody. Single hybridoma cells are cloned to produce many identical cells that all produce the same antibody. A large amount of the antibody can be collected and purified.
AQA new specification-Hydrocarbons-C9.1
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AQA new specification-Hydrocarbons-C9.1

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C9-Organic chemistry-Hydrocarbons lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a high ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. AQA spec link: 4.7.1.1 Crude oil is a finite resource found in rocks. Crude oil is the remains of an ancient biomass consisting mainly of plankton that was buried in mud. Crude oil is a mixture of a very large number of compounds. Most of the compounds in crude oil are hydrocarbons, which are molecules made up of hydrogen and carbon atoms only. Most of the hydrocarbons in crude oil are hydrocarbons called alkanes. The general formula for the homologous series of alkanes is CnH2n+2 The first four members of the alkanes are methane, ethane, propane and butane. Alkane molecules can be represented in the following forms: C2H6 or Students should be able to recognise substances as alkanes given their formulae in these forms. Students do not need to know the names of specific alkanes other than methane, ethane, propane and butane.
AQA new specification-B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems-Separate science bundle
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AQA new specification-B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems-Separate science bundle

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This bundle contains the content for SEPARATE science students. It includes the B18 unit-Biodiversity and ecosystems. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 24% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 11 lessons Lesson 1-The human population explosion Lesson 2-Land and water pollution Lesson 3-Air pollution Lesson 4-Deforestation and peat destruction Lesson 5-Global warming Lesson 6-Maintaining biodiversity Lesson 7-The impact of change Lesson 8 + 9 -Trophic levels and biomass transfers Lesson 10-Factors affecting food security Lesson 11-Making food production efficient Lesson 12-Sustainable food production Good luck with your lessons :)
AQA new specification-Trophic levels and biomass transfers-B18.8-9
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AQA new specification-Trophic levels and biomass transfers-B18.8-9

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Please note that I have merged the content of two lessons into one resource. Trophic levels and biomass transfers lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, past paper questions, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.4; 1, 2, 3 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 300-301 Students are required to know the following; 7.4.1 Students should be able to describe the differences between the trophic levels of organisms within an ecosystem. Trophic levels can be represented by numbers, starting at level 1 with plants and algae. Further trophic levels are numbered subsequently according to how far the organism is along the food chain. Level 1: Plants and algae make their own food and are called producers. Level 2: Herbivores eat plants/algae and are called primary consumers. Level 3: Carnivores that eat herbivores are called secondary consumers. Level 4: Carnivores that eat other carnivores are called tertiary consumers. Apex predators are carnivores with no predators. Decomposers break down dead plant and animal matter by secreting enzymes into the environment. Small soluble food molecules then diffuse into the microorganism. 7.4.2 Pyramids of biomass can be constructed to represent the relative amount of biomass in each level of a food chain. Trophic level 1 is at the bottom of the pyramid. Students should be able to construct accurate pyramids of biomass from appropriate data. 7.4.3 Students should be able to: • describe pyramids of biomass • explain how biomass is lost between the different trophic levels. Producers are mostly plants and algae which transfer about 1% of the incident energy from light for photosynthesis. Only approximately 10% of the biomass from each trophic level is transferred to the level above it. Losses of biomass are due to: • not all the ingested material is absorbed, some is egested as faeces • some absorbed material is lost as waste, such as carbon dioxide and water in respiration and water and urea in urine. Large amounts of glucose are used in respiration. Students should be able to calculate the efficiency of biomass transfers between trophic levels by percentages or fractions of mass. Students should be able to explain how this affects the number of organisms at each trophic level.
AQA new specification-Sustainable food production-B18.12
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AQA new specification-Sustainable food production-B18.12

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Sustainable food production lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, past paper questions, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.5; 3, 4 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 308-309 Students are required to know the following; Fish stocks in the oceans are declining. It is important to maintain fish stocks at a level where breeding continues or certain species may disappear altogether in some areas. Control of net size and the introduction of fishing quotas play important roles in conservation of fish stocks at a sustainable level. Students should be able to describe and explain some possible biotechnical and agricultural solutions, including genetic modification, to the demands of the growing human population. Modern biotechnology techniques enable large quantities of microorganisms to be cultured for food. The fungus Fusarium is useful for producing mycoprotein, a protein-rich food suitable for vegetarians. The fungus is grown on glucose syrup, in aerobic conditions, and the biomass is harvested and purified. A genetically modified bacterium produces human insulin. When harvested and purified this is used to treat people with diabetes. GM crops could provide more food or food with an improved nutritional value such as golden rice.
AQA new specification-B17 Biodiversity and ecosystems-Combined/Additional science bundle
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AQA new specification-B17 Biodiversity and ecosystems-Combined/Additional science bundle

6 Resources
This bundle only contains the content for COMBINED/ADDITIONAL science students. It includes the B17 unit-Biodiversity and ecosystems. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 20% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 6 lessons These lessons are suitable to teach separate science. Lesson 1-The human population explosion Lesson 2-Land and water pollution Lesson 3-Air pollution Lesson 4-Deforestation and peat destruction Lesson 5-Global warming Lesson 6-Maintaining biodiversity Good luck with your lessons :)
AQA new specification-Factors affecting food security, making food production efficient-B18.10-11
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AQA new specification-Factors affecting food security, making food production efficient-B18.10-11

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Please note that this resource contains two lessons worth of content. Factors affecting food security and making food production efficient lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, past paper questions, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.5; 1, 2, 3 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 304-307 Students are required to know the following; 7.5.1 Students should be able to describe some of the biological factors affecting levels of food security. Food security is having enough food to feed a population. Biological factors which are threatening food security include: • the increasing birth rate has threatened food security in some countries • changing diets in developed countries means scarce food resources are transported around the world • new pests and pathogens affect farming • environmental changes affect food production, such as widespread famine occurring in some countries if rains fail • cost of agricultural inputs • conflicts have arisen in some parts of the world over the availability of water or food. Sustainable methods must be found to feed all people on Earth. 7.5.2 The efficiency of food production can be improved by restricting energy transfer from food animals to the environment. This can be done by limiting their movement and by controlling the temperature of their surroundings. Some animals are fed high protein foods to increase growth. 7.5.3 Fish stocks in the oceans are declining. It is important to maintain fish stocks at a level where breeding continues or certain species may disappear altogether in some areas. Control of net size and the introduction of fishing quotas play important roles in conservation of fish stocks at a sustainable level.
AQA new specification-Trophic levels and biomass transfers-B18.8-9
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AQA new specification-Trophic levels and biomass transfers-B18.8-9

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Please note that I have merged the content of two lessons into one resource. Trophic levels and biomass transfers lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, past paper questions, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded videos and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.4; 1, 2, 3 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 300-301 Students are required to know the following; 7.4.1 Students should be able to describe the differences between the trophic levels of organisms within an ecosystem. Trophic levels can be represented by numbers, starting at level 1 with plants and algae. Further trophic levels are numbered subsequently according to how far the organism is along the food chain. Level 1: Plants and algae make their own food and are called producers. Level 2: Herbivores eat plants/algae and are called primary consumers. Level 3: Carnivores that eat herbivores are called secondary consumers. Level 4: Carnivores that eat other carnivores are called tertiary consumers. Apex predators are carnivores with no predators. Decomposers break down dead plant and animal matter by secreting enzymes into the environment. Small soluble food molecules then diffuse into the microorganism. 7.4.2 Pyramids of biomass can be constructed to represent the relative amount of biomass in each level of a food chain. Trophic level 1 is at the bottom of the pyramid. Students should be able to construct accurate pyramids of biomass from appropriate data. 7.4.3 Students should be able to: • describe pyramids of biomass • explain how biomass is lost between the different trophic levels. Producers are mostly plants and algae which transfer about 1% of the incident energy from light for photosynthesis. Only approximately 10% of the biomass from each trophic level is transferred to the level above it. Losses of biomass are due to: • not all the ingested material is absorbed, some is egested as faeces • some absorbed material is lost as waste, such as carbon dioxide and water in respiration and water and urea in urine. Large amounts of glucose are used in respiration. Students should be able to calculate the efficiency of biomass transfers between trophic levels by percentages or fractions of mass. Students should be able to explain how this affects the number of organisms at each trophic level.
AQA new specification-Global-warming-B17.5
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AQA new specification-Global-warming-B17.5

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Global warming lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, homework, self-assessment, interactive mark scheme, embedded video’s and review. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.3.5 Relevant chapter: B17 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology for combined science textbook-Page 240-241 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe some of the biological consequences of global warming. Levels of carbon dioxide and methane in the atmosphere are increasing, and contribute to ‘global warming’.