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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-Reduce, reuse and recycle-C12.6
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AQA new specification-Reduce, reuse and recycle-C12.6

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C12-Using Earths resources-Reduce, reuse and recycle lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. NB: an article has been attached for those students who are really intrested in the statistics, a great stretch and challenge activity. AQA spec link: 4.10.2.2
AQA new specification-Water safe to drink-C12.2
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AQA new specification-Water safe to drink-C12.2

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C12-Using Earths resources-Water safe to drink lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a low ability year 11 class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. NB: order of magnitude was not taught in this lesson. AQA spec link: 4.10.1.2
AQA new specification-Atmospheric pollutants-C13.5
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AQA new specification-Atmospheric pollutants-C13.5

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Atmospheric pollutants lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.3.1, 2
AQA new specification-Global-climate-change-C13.4
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AQA new specification-Global-climate-change-C13.4

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Global climate change lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.2.3,4
AQA new specification-Greenhouse gases-C13.3
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AQA new specification-Greenhouse gases-C13.3

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Greenhouse gases lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.2.1, 2, Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere maintain temperatures on Earth high enough to support life. Water vapour, carbon dioxide, and methane are greenhouse gases. Students should be able to describe the greenhouse effect in terms of the interaction of short and long wavelength radiation with matter. Some human activities increase the amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These include: • carbon dioxide • methane. Students should be able to recall two human activities that increase the amounts of each of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane. Based on peer-reviewed evidence, many scientists believe that human activities will cause the temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere to increase at the surface and that this will result in global climate change. However, it is difficult to model such complex systems as global climate change. This leads to simplified models, speculation, and opinions presented in the media that may be based on only parts of the evidence and which may be biased. Students should be able to: • evaluate the quality of evidence in a report about global climate change given appropriate information • describe uncertainties in the evidence base • recognise the importance of peer review of results and of communicating results to a wide range of audiences.
AQA new specification-Our evolving atmosphere-C13.2
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AQA new specification-Our evolving atmosphere-C13.2

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Our evolving atmosphere lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.1.1, 2, 4 AQA spec link: For 200 million years, the proportions of different gases in the atmosphere have been much the same as they are today: • about four-fifths (approximately 80%) nitrogen • about one-fifth (approximately 20%) oxygen • small proportions of various other gases, including carbon dioxide, water vapour, and noble gases. Volcanoes also produced nitrogen which gradually built up in the atmosphere and there may have been small proportions of methane and ammonia. Algae and plants decreased the percentage of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by photosynthesis. Carbon dioxide was also decreased by the formation of sedimentary rocks and fossil fuels that contain carbon. Students should be able to: • describe the main changes in the atmosphere over time and some of the likely causes of these changes • describe and explain the formation of deposits of limestone, coal, crude oil, and natural gas.
AQA new specification-History of the atmosphere-C13.1
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AQA new specification-History of the atmosphere-C13.1

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-History of our atmoshphere lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.1.2, 3 Theories about what was in the Earth’s early atmosphere and how the atmosphere was formed have changed and developed over time. Evidence for the early atmosphere is limited because of the time scale of 4.6 billion years. One theory suggests that during the first billion years of the Earth’s existence there was intense volcanic activity that released gases that formed the early atmosphere and water vapour that condensed to form the oceans. At the start of this period the Earth’s atmosphere may have been like the atmospheres of Mars and Venus today, consisting of mainly carbon dioxide with little or no oxygen gas. Volcanoes also produced nitrogen which gradually built up in the atmosphere and there may have been small proportions of methane and ammonia. When the oceans formed carbon dioxide dissolved in the water and carbonates were precipitated producing sediments, reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. No knowledge of other theories is required. Students should be able to, given appropriate information, interpret evidence and evaluate different theories about the Earth’s early atmosphere. 9.1.3 Algae and plants produced the oxygen that is now in the atmosphere by photosynthesis, which can be represented by the equation: 6CO2 + 6H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2 carbon dioxide + water glucose + oxygen Algae first produced oxygen about 2.7 billion years ago and soon after this oxygen appeared in the atmosphere. Over the next billion years plants evolved and the percentage of oxygen gradually increased to a level that enabled animals to evolve.
AQA new specification-C9 Crude oil and fuels-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-C9 Crude oil and fuels-Complete bundle

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This bundle includes the C9 unit-Crude oil and fuels. This bundle is suitable for both combined and separate science students. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required although URL has also been provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 22% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Hydrocarbons Lesson 2-Fractional distillation Lesson 3-Practical-Fractional distillation Lesson 4-Burning hydrocarbon fuels Lesson 4-Cracking hydrocarbons
AQA new specification-Cracking-hydrocarbons-C9.4
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AQA new specification-Cracking-hydrocarbons-C9.4

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C9-Organic chemistry-Cracking hydrocarbons created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. P.S if you have a double lesson with your class I recommend you allow the class to perform the bromine test and demo the cracking experiment to consolidate learning. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.7.1.4 Hydrocarbons can be broken down (cracked) to produce smaller, more useful molecules. Cracking can be done by various methods including catalytic cracking and steam cracking. Students should be able to describe in general terms the conditions used for catalytic cracking and steam cracking. The products of cracking include alkanes and another type of hydrocarbon called alkenes. Alkenes are more reactive than alkanes and react with bromine water, which is used as a test for alkenes. Students should be able to recall the colour change when bromine water reacts with an alkene. There is a high demand for fuels with small molecules and so some of the products of cracking are useful as fuels. Alkenes are used to produce polymers and as starting materials for the production of many other chemicals. Students should be able to balance chemical equations as examples of cracking given the formulae of the reactants and products. Students should be able to give examples to illustrate the usefulness of cracking. They should also be able to explain how modern life depends on the uses of hydrocarbons. (For Combined Science: Trilogy and Synergy students do not need to know the formulae or names of individual alkenes.) WS 1.2
AQA new specification-Burning hydrocarbon fuels-C9.3
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AQA new specification-Burning hydrocarbon fuels-C9.3

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C9-Organic chemistry-Burning hydrocarbon fuels created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, practical demo, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.7.1.3 The combustion of hydrocarbon fuels releases energy. During combustion, the carbon and hydrogen in the fuels are oxidised. The complete combustion of a hydrocarbon produces carbon dioxide and water. Students should be able to write balanced equations for the complete combustion of hydrocarbons with a given formula.
AQA new specification-Fractional distillation of oil-C9.2
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AQA new specification-Fractional distillation of oil-C9.2

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Please note two lessons worth of content are attached to this resource. C9-Organic chemistry-Fractional distillation of oil lessons created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, practical lesson, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. Top tip-To make the most out of this resource teach within a double period. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.7.1.2 The many hydrocarbons in crude oil may be separated into fractions, each of which contains molecules with a similar number of carbon atoms, by fractional distillation. The fractions can be processed to produce fuels and feedstock for the petrochemical industry. Many of the fuels on which we depend for our modern lifestyle, such as petrol, diesel oil, kerosene, heavy fuel oil and liquefied petroleum gases, are produced from crude oil. Many useful materials on which modern life depends are produced by the petrochemical industry, such as solvents, lubricants, polymers, detergents. The vast array of natural and synthetic carbon compounds occur due to the ability of carbon atoms to form families of similar compounds. Students should be able to explain how fractional distillation works in terms of evaporation and condensation. Knowledge of the names of other specific fractions or fuels is not required.
AQA new specification-Hydrocarbons-C9.1
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AQA new specification-Hydrocarbons-C9.1

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C9-Organic chemistry-Hydrocarbons lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a high ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. AQA spec link: 4.7.1.1 Crude oil is a finite resource found in rocks. Crude oil is the remains of an ancient biomass consisting mainly of plankton that was buried in mud. Crude oil is a mixture of a very large number of compounds. Most of the compounds in crude oil are hydrocarbons, which are molecules made up of hydrogen and carbon atoms only. Most of the hydrocarbons in crude oil are hydrocarbons called alkanes. The general formula for the homologous series of alkanes is CnH2n+2 The first four members of the alkanes are methane, ethane, propane and butane. Alkane molecules can be represented in the following forms: C2H6 or Students should be able to recognise substances as alkanes given their formulae in these forms. Students do not need to know the names of specific alkanes other than methane, ethane, propane and butane.
Certificate of Achievement and Effort for Chemistry
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Certificate of Achievement and Effort for Chemistry

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Every year we have students that have gone above and beyond within our classes however, they aren’t always acknowledged in reward assemblies because of the large pool of students they are competing against. Most of the certificate templates I found online were either over complicated, childish or both. Students in secondary school wish to be treated as young adults hence, I have created a sophisticated certificate, one that students would be proud to take home. Reward the students in your chemistry classes for their achievement and effort using these certificates, download for free and edit away! If you like this certificate but don’t teach chemsitry, edit away! P.S I have attached PDF and Word doc versions, I recommend you print your certificates as PDF.
Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Complete bundle
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Complete bundle

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This bundle includes all the resources required to teach unit 2D for the new Pearson BTEC applied science specification. Learning aim D: Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work All lessons have been created in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 22% by purchasing this bundle. Lesson 1-Personal responsibility Lesson 2-Interpersonal skills Lesson 3-Professional practice Assignment template
Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2C-How to write a scientific report
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2C-How to write a scientific report

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Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim C: Undertake chromatographic techniques to identify components in mixtures. For many of my students this was the first time they needed to write a scientific report i thus produced a guide for this learning aim. This was a huge success and i had the pleasure of marking some beautifully written reports. The relevant P/M/D criteria for this learning aim have been covered within this guide. I’ve also attached the specification and assignment briefs so you can have it all in one place. Best of all enjoy it all for free :)
Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Personal  responsibility
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2D-Personal responsibility

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Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim D: Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work. How did i teach this? This assignment allows students to review the skills they attained in this unit. It also reiterates the importance of H&S as well as professional practice. Before setting the assignment i first taught three lessons covering the content in Pearson BTEC national-Applied science-Student book 1. Due to the complexity of this assignment i provided my students with a template which covered the P/M/D criteria (download the free template). This prevented students from going off on a tangent and also ensured they had mentioned the key skills for both assignment B and C. NB: Personal responsibility is the first of the three lessons. Worksheets attached and videos embedded for ease of use.
Pearson BTEC -Sample assessment material - Unit 1 Principles and Applications of Science I
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Pearson BTEC -Sample assessment material - Unit 1 Principles and Applications of Science I

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Attached is the sample assessment material on UNIT 1 For the NEW (2016) BTEC applied science specification. I have given my students each a copy of the sample paper (w/o mark scheme) for an open book assessment, in preparation for their mocks but you can use it is as a class test. For ease of use i converted the PDF file into a word document which i have also attached. It was very fiddly to find this on the pearson website and i dislike editing pdf documents so i hope it has saved you some hassle. Please leave a review to let me know if it was useful or how you used it in your lesson.
AQA new specification-Water purification required practical-C12.2
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AQA new specification-Water purification required practical-C12.2

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C12-Chemical analysis- Water purification required practical-lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a low ability year 11 class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. Top tips*I recommend each group is assigned one type of water for dissolved salts part of experiment, collate the results as a class in the end-it'll take forever otherwise. Also, demo the distillation process for a low ability class. AQA spec link: 5.10.1.2 Required practical activity 13: analysis and purification of water samples from different sources, including pH, dissolved solids and distillation. AT skills covered by this practical activity: chemistry AT 2, 3 and 4. This practical activity also provides opportunities to develop WS and MS. Details of all skills are given in Key opportunities for skills development.
AQA new specification-Life cycle assessment-C12.5
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AQA new specification-Life cycle assessment-C12.5

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Please note this lesson has recently been updated C12-Using Earths resources-Life cycle assessment lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. [NB: C12.4 on extracting metal ores is only for HT students] AQA spec link: 5.10.2.1 environmental impact of products in each of these stages: •• extracting and processing raw materials •• manufacturing and packaging •• use and operation during its lifetime •• disposal at the end of its useful life, including transport and distribution at each stage. Use of water, resources, energy sources and production of some wastes can be fairly easily quantified. Allocating numerical values to pollutant effects is less straightforward and requires value judgements, so LCA is not a purely objective process. Selective or abbreviated LCAs can be devised to evaluate a product but these can be misused to reach pre-determined conclusions, eg in support of claims for advertising purposes. Students should be able to carry out simple comparative LCAs for shopping bags made from plastic and paper.
AQA new specification-Treating waste water-C12.3
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AQA new specification-Treating waste water-C12.3

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C12-Using Earths resources-Treating waste water lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a low ability year 11 class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. AQA spec link: 5.10.1.3 Urban lifestyles and industrial processes produce large amounts of waste water that require treatment before being released into the environment. Sewage and agricultural waste water require removal of organic matter and harmful microbes. Industrial waste water may require removal of organic matter and harmful chemicals. Sewage treatment includes: •• screening and grit removal •• sedimentation to produce sewage sludge and effluent •• anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge •• aerobic biological treatment of effluent. Students should be able to comment on the relative ease of obtaining potable water from waste, ground and salt water.