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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2C-How to write a scientific report
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2C-How to write a scientific report

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Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim C: Undertake chromatographic techniques to identify components in mixtures. For many of my students this was the first time they needed to write a scientific report i thus produced a guide for this learning aim. This was a huge success and i had the pleasure of marking some beautifully written reports. The relevant P/M/D criteria for this learning aim have been covered within this guide. I’ve also attached the specification and assignment briefs so you can have it all in one place. Best of all enjoy it all for free :)
AQA new specification-B13 Reproduction bundle-Biology/separate science
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AQA new specification-B13 Reproduction bundle-Biology/separate science

11 Resources
Due to popular demand I have uploaded a B13 bundle. This bundle contains the content for BIOLOGY/SEPARATE science students. It includes all the resources you need to teach the B13 Reproduction topic. If you're teaching this topic (B12) to combined science students I've uploaded a separate bundle for it. Lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos embedded for ease of use, paper friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 42% by purchasing this bundle. Higher topics included. Total 11 lessons + Past paper question pack on mitosis and meiosis. L1 = types of reproduction L2 = cell division and sexual reproduction L3 = the best of both worlds L4 = DNA and the genome L5a = DNA structure L5b = protein synthesis L6 = gene expression and mutation L7 = inheritance in Action L8 = more about genetics L9 = inherited disorders L10 = screening for genetic disorders
AQA new specification-The role of negative feedback-B11.4
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AQA new specification-The role of negative feedback-B11.4

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The role of negative feedback lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). This content is for HIGHER TIER only. Includes: slide animations, embedded video, practice exam question with mark scheme. This resource is suitable for combined science students. May needed to be edited for foundation students. AQA spec link: 5.3.7 Relevant chapter: B11 Hormonal coordination. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 166-167. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the roles of thyroxine and adrenaline in the body. Adrenaline is produced by the adrenal glands in times of fear or stress. It increases the heart rate and boosts the delivery of oxygen and glucose to the brain and muscles, preparing the body for ‘flight or fight’. Thyroxine from the thyroid gland stimulates the basal metabolic rate. It plays an important role in growth and development. Thyroxine levels are controlled by negative feedback.
AQA new specification-Gene expression and mutation-B13.6
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AQA new specification-Gene expression and mutation-B13.6

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Gene expression and mutation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). NB: BIOLOGY ONLY-HT. Designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 6.1.5 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 206-207. Specification requires students to know the following; (HT only) Mutations occur continuously. Most do not alter the protein, or only alter it slightly so that its appearance or function is not changed. (HT only) A few mutations code for an altered protein with a different shape. An enzyme may no longer fit the substrate binding site or a structural protein may lose its strength. (HT only) Not all parts of DNA code for proteins. Non-coding parts of DNA can switch genes on and off, so variations in these areas of DNA may affect how genes are expressed.
AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 1-Microscopy-B1
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AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICAL 1-Microscopy-B1

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To use a light microscope to observe, draw and label a selection of plant and animal cells. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.5 Relevant chapter: B1 Cells and organisation. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 4-5 In doing this practical students should cover these parts of the apparatus and techniques requirements. Biology AT 1 – use appropriate apparatus to record length and area. Biology AT 7 – use a microscope to make observations of biological specimens and produce labelled scientific drawings
AQA new specification-Diseases caused by fungi and protists-B5.8
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AQA new specification-Diseases caused by fungi and protists-B5.8

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This lesson has been created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my combined/additional science class (Year 9-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is suitable for separate science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.1.4 and 4.3.1.5 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 88-89. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Rose black spot is a fungal disease where purple or black spots develop on leaves, which often turn yellow and drop early. It affects the growth of the plant as photosynthesis is reduced. It is spread in the environment by water or wind. Rose black spot can be treated by using fungicides and/or removing and destroying the affected leaves. The pathogens that cause malaria are protists. The malarial protist has a life cycle that includes the mosquito. Malaria causes recurrent episodes of fever and can be fatal. The spread of malaria is controlled by preventing the vectors, mosquitos, from breeding and by using mosquito nets to avoid being bitten.
AQA new specification-Inheritance in action-B13.7
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AQA new specification-Inheritance in action-B13.7

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Inheritance in action lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.6 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 208-209. Students should be able to explain the terms: • gamete • chromosome • gene • allele • dominant • recessive • homozygous • heterozygous • genotype • phenotype. Some characteristics are controlled by a single gene, such as: fur colour in mice; and red-green colour blindness in humans. Each gene may have different forms called alleles. The alleles present, or genotype, operate at a molecular level to develop characteristics that can be expressed as a phenotype. A dominant allele is always expressed, even if only one copy is present. A recessive allele is only expressed if two copies are present (therefore no dominant allele present). If the two alleles present are the same the organism is homozygous for that trait, but if the alleles are different they are heterozygous. Most characteristics are a result of multiple genes interacting, rather than a single gene. Students should be able to understand the concept of probability in predicting the results of a single gene cross, but recall that most phenotype features are the result of multiple genes rather than single gene inheritance. MS 2e Students should be able to use direct proportion and simple ratios to express the outcome of a genetic cross. MS 1c, 3a Students should be able to complete a Punnett square diagram and extract and interpret information from genetic crosses and family trees. MS 2c, 4a (HT only) Students should be able to construct a genetic cross by Punnett square diagram and use it to make predictions using the theory of probability.
AQA new specification-Inherited disorders-B13.9
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AQA new specification-Inherited disorders-B13.9

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Inherited disorders lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. Included a set of past paper questions, with level 1-3 demand questions, this is an excellent way of reviewing the lesson and differentiating within the classroom. Mark scheme has also been attached separately. AQA spec link: 6.1.7 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 212-213. Students are required to know the following; Some disorders are inherited. These disorders are caused by the inheritance of certain alleles. • Polydactyly (having extra fingers or toes) is caused by a dominant allele. • Cystic fibrosis (a disorder of cell membranes) is caused by a recessive allele. Students should make informed judgements about the economic, social and ethical issues concerning embryo screening, given appropriate information. WS 1.3 Appreciate that embryo screening and gene therapy may alleviate suffering but consider the ethical issues which arise
AQA new specification-Pure substances and mixtures-C10.1
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AQA new specification-Pure substances and mixtures-C10.1

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C10-Chemical analysis-Pure substances and mixtures lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a low ability year 11 class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. AQA spec link: 5.8.1.1 and 5.8.1.2 In chemistry, a pure substance is a single element or compound, not mixed with any other substance. Pure elements and compounds melt and boil at specific temperatures. Melting point and boiling point data can be used to distinguish pure substances from mixtures. In everyday language, a pure substance can mean a substance that has had nothing added to it, so it is unadulterated and in its natural state, eg pure milk. Students should be able to use melting point and boiling point data to distinguish pure from impure substances. Many products are complex mixtures in which each chemical has a particular purpose. Formulations are made by mixing the components in carefully measured quantities to ensure that the product has the required properties. Formulations include fuels, cleaning agents, paints, medicines, alloys, fertilisers and foods. Students should be able to identify formulations given appropriate information. Students do not need to know the names of components in proprietary products.
AQA new specification-Growth and differentiation-B2.2
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AQA new specification-Growth and differentiation-B2.2

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Growth and differentiation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded video, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.4 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 28-29 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the importance of cell differentiation. As an organism develops, cells differentiate to form different types of cells. • Most types of animal cell differentiate at an early stage. ••Many types of plant cells retain the ability to differentiate throughout life. In mature animals, cell division is mainly restricted to repair and replacement. As a cell differentiates it acquires different sub-cellular structures to enable it to carry out a certain function. It has become a specialised cell.
AQA new specification-Cell division (mitosis)-B2.1
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AQA new specification-Cell division (mitosis)-B2.1

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Cell division (mitosis) lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and worksheet. AQA spec link: 4.1.2.1 & 4.1.2.2 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 26-27 Specification requires students to know the following; The nucleus of a cell contains chromosomes made of DNA molecules. Each chromosome carries a large number of genes. In body cells the chromosomes are normally found in pairs. Cells divide in a series of stages called the cell cycle. Students should be able to describe the stages of the cell cycle, including mitosis. During the cell cycle the genetic material is doubled and then divided into two identical cells. Before a cell can divide it needs to grow and increase the number of sub-cellular structures such as ribosomes and mitochondria. The DNA replicates to form two copies of each chromosome. In mitosis one set of chromosomes is pulled to each end of the cell and the nucleus divides. Finally the cytoplasm and cell membranes divide to form two identical cells. Students need to understand the three overall stages of the cell cycle but do not need to know the different phases of the mitosis stage. Cell division by mitosis is important in the growth and development of multi-cellular organisms. Students should be able to recognise and describe situations in given contexts where mitosis is occurring.
AQA new specification-Evolution by natural selection-B13.2
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AQA new specification-Evolution by natural selection-B13.2

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Evolution by natural selection lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability (trilogy/combined) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.2.1 + 4.6.2.2 Relevant chapter: B13 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 180-181. Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to: • state that there is usually extensive genetic variation within a population of a species • recall that all variants arise from mutations and that: most have no effect on the phenotype; some influence phenotype; very few determine phenotype. Mutations occur continuously. Very rarely a mutation will lead to a new phenotype. If the new phenotype is suited to an environmental change it can lead to a relatively rapid change in the species. Students should be able to describe evolution as a change in the inherited characteristics of a population over time through a process of natural selection which may result in the formation of a new species. The theory of evolution by natural selection states that all species of living things have evolved from simple life forms that first developed more than three billion years ago. Students should be able to explain how evolution occurs through natural selection of variants that give rise to phenotypes best suited to their environment. If two populations of one species become so different in phenotype that they can no longer interbreed to produce fertile offspring they have formed two new species.
AQA new specification-B3 Organisation and the digestive system -Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B3 Organisation and the digestive system -Complete bundle

9 Resources
This bundle includes the B3 unit-Organisation and the digestive system. This bundle is suitable for both combined and separate science students. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required although URL has also been provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 22% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Tissues and organs Lesson 2-The human digestive system Lesson 3-The chemistry of food Lesson 4-RP 4-Food tests Lesson 5-Catalysts and enzymes Lesson 6-Factors affecting enzyme action Lesson 7-How the digestive system works Lesson 8-RP 5-Enzymes Lesson 9-Making digestion efficient
AQA new specification-Variation-B13.1
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AQA new specification-Variation-B13.1

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Variation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability (trilogy/combined) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 4.6.2.1 Relevant chapter: B13 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 178-179. Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe simply how the genome and its interaction with the environment influence the development of the phenotype of an organism. Differences in the characteristics of individuals in a population is called variation and may be due to differences in: • the genes they have inherited (genetic causes) • the conditions in which they have developed (environmental causes) • a combination of genes and the environment. NB: Mutations reference will be taught in the subsequent lesson.
AQA new specification-Exchanging materials-B1.10
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AQA new specification-Exchanging materials-B1.10

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Exchanging materials lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet, and homework (with MS) AQA spec link: 4.1.3.1 Relevant chapter: B1 Cell structure and transport. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 22-23 Specification requires students to know the following; A single-celled organism has a relatively large surface area to volume ratio. This allows sufficient transport of molecules into and out of the cell to meet the needs of the organism. Students should be able to calculate and compare surface area to volume ratios. Students should be able to explain the need for exchange surfaces and a transport system in multicellular organisms in terms of surface area to volume ratio. Students should be able to explain how the small intestine and lungs in mammals, gills in fish, and the roots and leaves in plants, are adapted for exchanging materials. In multicellular organisms, surfaces and organ systems are specialised for exchanging materials. This is to allow sufficient molecules to be transported into and out of cells for the organism’s needs. The effectiveness of an exchange surface is increased by: •• having a large surface area •• a membrane that is thin, to provide a short diffusion path •• (in animals) having an efficient blood supply •• (in animals, for gaseous exchange) being ventilated.
AQA new specification-B1-Cell structure and transport-complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B1-Cell structure and transport-complete bundle

10 Resources
B1 unit-Cell structure and transport. Designed for a higher ability group. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use and printer friendly resources attached. I’ve also included the required practical resources. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 34% by purchasing this bundle Lesson 1-World of the microscope Lesson 2-Animal and plant cells -Microscopy required practical Lesson 3-Eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells Lesson 4-Specialisation in animal cells Lesson 5-Specialisation in plant cells Lesson 6-Diffusion Lesson 7-Osmosis Lesson 8-Osmosis required practical Lesson 9-Active transport Lesson 10-Exchanging materials
AQA new specification-Dialysis worksheet-B12.4
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AQA new specification-Dialysis worksheet-B12.4

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This worksheet requires students to complete an unlabelled diagram using the AQA biology textbook (Page 188-189). This worksheet supports the lesson created on dialysis. *Top tip-to save printing print 2 of these pages to 1 A4 * AQA spec link: 5.3.3 People who suffer from kidney failure may be treated by using kidney dialysis. Students should know the basic principles of the operation of a dialysis machine.
AQA new specification-The human Kidney-B12.3
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AQA new specification-The human Kidney-B12.3

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The human Kidney lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). This is a printer friendly resource it includes an: embedded video, slide animations and a mini exam question. As i taught this lesson in two parts it's only fair i upload the other presentation also (2 for the price of 1). **Knowledge of other parts of the urinary system, the structure of the kidney, and the structure of a nephron is not required.** AQA spec link: 5.3.3 Relevant chapter: B12-Homeostasis in action. ( Note: This topic is for BIOLOGY only not for combined science students). AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 185-186 *The new specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the function of kidneys in maintaining the water balance of the body. The kidneys produce urine by filtration of the blood and selective reabsorption of useful substances such as glucose, some ions, And water. Knowledge of other parts of the urinary system, the structure of the kidney, and the structure of a nephron is not required. Students should be able to translate tables and bar charts of glucose, ions, and urea before and after filtration. Students should be able to describe the effect of ADH on the permeability of the kidney tubules. The water level in the body is controlled by the hormone ADH which acts on the kidney tubules. ADH is released by the pituitary gland when the blood is too concentrated and it causes more water to be reabsorbed back into the blood from the kidney tubules. This is controlled by negative feedback.
AQA new specification-Screening genetic disorders-B13.10
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AQA new specification-Screening genetic disorders-B13.10

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NB-This resource has been edited since the last review* [30/9/17] Screening for genetic disorders lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability TRILOGY(combined science) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a quiz. This video contains many videos and is a great lesson to spark a debate. I'd appreciate a review after your lesson :) AQA spec link: 6.1.7 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 214-215. Some disorders are inherited. These disorders are caused by the inheritance of certain alleles. • Polydactyly (having extra fingers or toes) is caused by a dominant allele. • Cystic fibrosis (a disorder of cell membranes) is caused by a recessive allele. Students should make informed judgements about the economic, social and ethical issues concerning embryo screening, given appropriate information. WS 1.3 Appreciate that embryo screening and gene therapy may alleviate suffering but consider the ethical issues which arise.
AQA new specification-Types of reproduction-B13.1
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AQA new specification-Types of reproduction-B13.1

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Types of reproduction lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.1 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 196-197. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should understand that meiosis leads to non-identical cells being formed while mitosis leads to identical cells being formed. Sexual reproduction involves the joining (fusion) of male and female gametes: • sperm and egg cells in animals • pollen and egg cells in flowering plants. In sexual reproduction there is mixing of genetic information which leads to variety in the offspring. The formation of gametes involves meiosis. Asexual reproduction involves only one parent and no fusion of gametes. There is no mixing of genetic information. This leads to genetically identical offspring (clones). Only mitosis is involved. Biology only-6.1.3 Advantages of sexual reproduction: • produces variation in the offspring • if the environment changes variation gives a survival advantage by natural selection • natural selection can be speeded up by humans in selective breeding to increase food production. Advantages of asexual reproduction: • only one parent needed • more time and energy efficient as do not need to find a mate • faster than sexual reproduction • many identical offspring can be produced when conditions are favourable Good luck with your lesson!