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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

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Paper friendly resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-B10 The human nervous system-Separate science bundle
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AQA new specification-B10 The human nervous system-Separate science bundle

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This bundle contains the content for SEPARATE/BIOLOGY ONLY students. It includes the B10 unit-The human nervous system. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 20% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 7 lessons Lesson 1-Principles of homeostasis Lesson 2-The structure and function of the human nervous system Lesson 3-RP 6/7-Reaction time Lesson 4-Reflex actions Lesson 5-The brain Lesson 6-The eye Lesson 7-Common problems of the eye Good luck with your lessons :)
AQA new specification-Human reproduction-B11.5
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AQA new specification-Human reproduction-B11.5

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Human reproduction lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my separates class (Year 10-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides. This resource is suitable for combined science students. May needed to be edited for foundation students. AQA spec link: 5.3.4 Relevant chapter: B11 Hormonal coordination. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 168-169. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the roles of hormones in human reproduction, including the menstrual cycle. During puberty reproductive hormones cause secondary sex characteristics to develop. Oestrogen is the main female reproductive hormone produced in the ovary. At puberty eggs begin to mature and one is released approximately every 28 days. This is called ovulation. Testosterone is the main male reproductive hormone produced by the testes and it stimulates sperm production. Several hormones are involved in the menstrual cycle of a woman. • Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) causes maturation of an egg in the ovary. • Luteinising hormone (LH) stimulates the release of the egg. • Oestrogen and progesterone are involved in maintaining the uterus lining.
AQA new specification-B12-Homeostasis in action-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B12-Homeostasis in action-Complete bundle

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This bundle includes the B12 unit-Homeostasis in action. This is a separates/biology ONLY unit. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 33% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Controlling body temperature Lesson 2-Removing waste products Lesson 3-The human kidney (taught this over 2 lessons, both included in this resource pack). Lesson 4-Dialysis-artificial kidney Lesson 5-Kidney transplants
AQA new specification-Our evolving atmosphere-C13.2
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AQA new specification-Our evolving atmosphere-C13.2

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C13-The Earth’s atmosphere-Our evolving atmosphere lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a mixed ability year 11 separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, and homework with answers as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. For further enquiries please email paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com AQA spec link: 4.9.1.1, 2, 4 AQA spec link: For 200 million years, the proportions of different gases in the atmosphere have been much the same as they are today: • about four-fifths (approximately 80%) nitrogen • about one-fifth (approximately 20%) oxygen • small proportions of various other gases, including carbon dioxide, water vapour, and noble gases. Volcanoes also produced nitrogen which gradually built up in the atmosphere and there may have been small proportions of methane and ammonia. Algae and plants decreased the percentage of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by photosynthesis. Carbon dioxide was also decreased by the formation of sedimentary rocks and fossil fuels that contain carbon. Students should be able to: • describe the main changes in the atmosphere over time and some of the likely causes of these changes • describe and explain the formation of deposits of limestone, coal, crude oil, and natural gas.
AQA new specification-Diseases caused by fungi and protists-B5.8
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AQA new specification-Diseases caused by fungi and protists-B5.8

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This lesson has been created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my combined/additional science class (Year 9-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheet and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is suitable for separate science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.1.4 and 4.3.1.5 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 88-89. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Rose black spot is a fungal disease where purple or black spots develop on leaves, which often turn yellow and drop early. It affects the growth of the plant as photosynthesis is reduced. It is spread in the environment by water or wind. Rose black spot can be treated by using fungicides and/or removing and destroying the affected leaves. The pathogens that cause malaria are protists. The malarial protist has a life cycle that includes the mosquito. Malaria causes recurrent episodes of fever and can be fatal. The spread of malaria is controlled by preventing the vectors, mosquitos, from breeding and by using mosquito nets to avoid being bitten.
AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4
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AQA new specification-DNA and the genome-B13.4

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DNA and the genome lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides and an interactive quiz. AQA spec link: 6.1.4 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 202-203. Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the structure of DNA and define genome. The genetic material in the nucleus of a cell is composed of a chemical called DNA. DNA is a polymer made up of two strands forming a double helix. The DNA is contained in structures called chromosomes. A gene is a small section of DNA on a chromosome. Each gene codes for a particular sequence of amino acids, to make a specific protein. The genome of an organism is the entire genetic material of that organism. The whole human genome has now been studied and this will have great importance for medicine in the future. Students should be able to discuss the importance of understanding the human genome. This is limited to the: • search for genes linked to different types of disease • understanding and treatment of inherited disorders • use in tracing human migration patterns from the past.
AQA new specification-B6 Preventing and treating disease-Combined/Additional science bundle
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AQA new specification-B6 Preventing and treating disease-Combined/Additional science bundle

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This bundle includes the B6 unit-Preventing and treating disease. This is a combined science unit. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required except for a BBC-drug trials video-URL provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 23% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Vaccination Lesson 2-Antibiotics and painkillers (L1) (taught this over 2 lessons, both included in this resource pack). Lesson 3-Antibiotics and painkillers (L2) Lesson 4-Discovering drugs Lesson 5-Developing drugs
AQA new specification-Tissues, organs and transport systems in plants-B4.6 + B4.7
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AQA new specification-Tissues, organs and transport systems in plants-B4.6 + B4.7

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***Please note this is two lessons comnined into one. *** Tissues, organs and transport systems lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability.Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.2.3.1 Relevant chapter: B4 Organising animals and plants. AQA Biology combined/third edition textbook-Page 62-65 Students are required to know the following Students should be able to explain how the structures of plant tissues are related to their functions. Plant tissues include: • epidermal tissues • palisade mesophyll • spongy mesophyll •xylem and phloem •meristem tissue found at the growing tips of shoots and roots. The leaf is a plant organ. Knowledge limited to epidermis, palisade and spongy mesophyll, xylem and phloem, and guard cells surrounding stomata. Students should be able to explain how the structure of root hair cells, xylem and phloem are adapted to their functions. Root hair cells are adapted for the efficient uptake of water by osmosis, and mineral ions by active transport. Xylem tissue transports water and mineral ions from the roots to the stems and leaves. It is composed of hollow tubes strengthened by lignin adapted for the transport of water in the transpiration stream. The role of stomata and guard cells are to control gas exchange and water loss. Phloem tissue transports dissolved sugars from the leaves to the rest of the plant for immediate use or storage. The movement of food molecules through phloem tissue is called translocation. Phloem is composed of tubes of elongated cells. Cell sap can move from one phloem cell to the next through pores in the end walls. Detailed structure of phloem tissue or the mechanism of transport is not required.
AQA new specification-B15 Genetics and evolution-Separate science bundle
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AQA new specification-B15 Genetics and evolution-Separate science bundle

10 Resources
This bundle contains the content for SEPARATE science students. It includes the B15 unit-Genetics and evolution. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 30% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 10 lessons Lesson 1-History of genetics Lesson 2-Theories of evolution Lesson 3-Accepting Darwin’s ideas Lesson 4-Evolution and speciation Lesson 5-Evidence for evolution Lesson 6-Fossils and extinction Lesson 7-More about extinction Lesson 8-Antibiotic resistant bacteria Lesson 9-Classification Lesson 10-New systems of classification Good luck with your lessons :)
AQA new specification-Stem cell dilemmas-B2.4
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AQA new specification-Stem cell dilemmas-B2.4

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Stem cells dilemmas lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded video, practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 4.1.2.3 Relevant chapter: B2 Cell division. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 32-33 Specification requires students to know the following; In therapeutic cloning an embryo is produced with the same genes as the patient. Stem cells from the embryo are not rejected by the patient’s body so they may be used for medical treatment. The use of stem cells has potential risks such as transfer of viral infection, and some people have ethical or religious objections. Stem cells from meristems in plants can be used to produce clones of plants quickly and economically. •• Rare species can be cloned to protect from extinction. •• Crop plants with special features such as disease resistance can be cloned to produce large numbers of identical plants for farmers.
AQA new specification-B8 Photosynthesis-Complete bundle
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AQA new specification-B8 Photosynthesis-Complete bundle

6 Resources
This bundle includes the B8 unit-Photosynthesis. This is a combined science unit. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use (no internet connection required although URL has also been provided), and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 17% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Photosynthesis (introduction) Lesson 2-Rate of photosynthesis Lesson 3-Required practical 6 Lesson 4-How plants use glucose Lesson 5-Making the most of photosynthesis
AQA new specification-Treating waste water-C12.3
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AQA new specification-Treating waste water-C12.3

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C12-Using Earths resources-Treating waste water lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a low ability year 11 class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a interactive review task. If for any reason the video link does not work, a URL has also been included in the notes. AQA spec link: 5.10.1.3 Urban lifestyles and industrial processes produce large amounts of waste water that require treatment before being released into the environment. Sewage and agricultural waste water require removal of organic matter and harmful microbes. Industrial waste water may require removal of organic matter and harmful chemicals. Sewage treatment includes: •• screening and grit removal •• sedimentation to produce sewage sludge and effluent •• anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge •• aerobic biological treatment of effluent. Students should be able to comment on the relative ease of obtaining potable water from waste, ground and salt water.
AQA new specification-Factors affecting enzyme action-B3.5
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AQA new specification-Factors affecting enzyme action-B3.5

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Factors affecting enzyme action lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video's and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. AQA spec link: 4.2.2.1 Relevant chapter: B3 Organisation and the digestive system. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 44-45 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to describe the nature of enzyme molecules and relate their activity to temperature and pH changes.
AQA new specification-Evaporation and transpiration-B4.8
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AQA new specification-Evaporation and transpiration-B4.8

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Evaporation and transpiration lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability.Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. Please note it is not necessary to print the worksheet for this lesson although it’s advisable if you are teaching a low ability class AQA spec link: 4.2.3.2 Relevant chapter: B4 Organising animals and plants. AQA Biology combined/third edition textbook-Page 66-67 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to explain how the structure of root hair cells, xylem and phloem are adapted to their functions. Root hair cells are adapted for the efficient uptake of water by osmosis, and mineral ions by active transport. Xylem tissue transports water and mineral ions from the roots to the stems and leaves. It is composed of hollow tubes strengthened by lignin adapted for the transport of water in the transpiration stream. The role of stomata and guard cells are to control gas exchange and water loss. AT 6, 7 Investigate the distribution of stomata and guard cells.
AQA new specification-Preventing bacterial growth-B5.4
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AQA new specification-Preventing bacterial growth-B5.4

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NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Preventing bacterial growth in the lab lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions, answers and homework have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.6 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 80-81. 1.1.6 Bacteria multiply by simple cell division (binary fission) as often as once every 20 minutes if they have enough nutrients and a suitable temperature. Students should be able to calculate cross-sectional areas of colonies or clear areas around colonies using r². Students should be able to calculate the number of bacteria in a population after a certain time if given the mean division time. Students should be able to express the answer in standard form.
AQA new specification-Growing bacteria in the lab-B5.3
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AQA new specification-Growing bacteria in the lab-B5.3

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NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Growing bacteria in the lab lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.1.1.6 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 78-79. Bacteria multiply by simple cell division (binary fission) as often as once every 20 minutes if they have enough nutrients and a suitable temperature. Bacteria can be grown in a nutrient broth solution or as colonies on an agar gel plate. Uncontaminated cultures of microorganisms are required for investigating the action of disinfectants and antibiotics. Students should be able to describe how to prepare an uncontaminated culture using aseptic technique. They should be able to explain why: • Petri dishes and culture media must be sterilised before use to kill unwanted microorganisms • inoculating loops used to transfer microorganisms to the media must be sterilised by passing them through a flame • the lid of the Petri dish should be secured with adhesive tape to prevent microorganisms from the air contaminating the culture, and stored upside down • in school and college laboratories, cultures should be incubated at a maximum temperature of 25 °C.
AQA new specification-Viral and bacterial diseases-B5.6-7
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AQA new specification-Viral and bacterial diseases-B5.6-7

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I taught bacterial and viral diseases in one lesson so that my students could compare and contrast between the two types. Students enjoyed finding out information online. It also allowed students to access a wealth of information and prompted very interesting discussions. I would recommend booking an ICT suite, i Pads or laptops to make the most out of the independent activity. If computer access is limited the student textbook can also be used :) This lesson has been created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1) for my combined/additional science class (Year 9-KS4). Includes: slide animations, embedded video, worksheets (including support sheet) and answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is suitable for separate science students. If you have a low ability group or would like to incorporate exam questions, i would recommend splitting this lesson in two. AQA spec link: 4.3.1.2, 4.3.1.3 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 84-87. *The new specification requires students to know the following; Explain how the spread of diseases can be reduced or prevented. Viral diseases Measles is a viral disease showing symptoms of fever and a red skin rash. Measles is a serious illness that can be fatal if complications arise. For this reason most young children are vaccinated against measles. The measles virus is spread by inhalation of droplets from sneezes and coughs. HIV initially causes a flu-like illness. Unless successfully controlled with antiretroviral drugs the virus attacks the body’s immune cells. Late stage HIV infection, or AIDS, occurs when the body’s immune system becomes so badly damaged it can no longer deal with other infections or cancers. HIV is spread by sexual contact or exchange of body fluids such as blood which occurs when drug users share needles. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a widespread plant pathogen affecting many species of plants including tomatoes. It gives a distinctive ‘mosaic’ pattern of discolouration on the leaves which affects the growth of the plant due to lack of photosynthesis . Bacterial diseases Salmonella food poisoning is spread by bacteria ingested in food, or on food prepared in unhygienic conditions. In the UK, poultry are vaccinated against. Salmonella to control the spread. Fever, abdominal cramps, vomiting, and diarrhoea are caused by the bacteria and the toxins they secrete. Gonorrhoea is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) with symptoms of a thick yellow or green discharge from the vagina or penis and pain on urinating. It is caused by a bacterium and was easily treated with the antibiotic penicillin until many resistant strains appeared. Gonorrhoea is spread by sexual contact. The spread can be controlled by treatment with antibiotics or the use of a barrier method of contraception such as a condom.
AQA new specification- Non-communicable diseases-B7.1
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AQA new specification- Non-communicable diseases-B7.1

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Non-communicable diseases lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. There is a strong overlap between this lesson and B5-health to revise what was taught before summer. Includes: slide animations, AQA spec link: 4.2.2.6 Relevant chapter: B7 Non-communicable diseases. AQA Biology combined textbook-Page 100-101 Specification requires students to know the following; Risk factors are linked to an increased rate of a disease. •aspects of a person’s lifestyle •substances in the person’s body or environment. A causal mechanism has been proven for some risk factors, but not in others. •Carcinogens, including ionising radiation, as risk factors in cancer. Many diseases are caused by the interaction of a number of factors.
Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2C-How to write a scientific report
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Pearson BTEC-Applied science-UNIT 2C-How to write a scientific report

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Unit 2-Practical scientific procedures and techniques Learning aim C: Undertake chromatographic techniques to identify components in mixtures. For many of my students this was the first time they needed to write a scientific report i thus produced a guide for this learning aim. This was a huge success and i had the pleasure of marking some beautifully written reports. The relevant P/M/D criteria for this learning aim have been covered within this guide. I’ve also attached the specification and assignment briefs so you can have it all in one place. Best of all enjoy it all for free :)
AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6  PAST PAPER QUESTION
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AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6 PAST PAPER QUESTION

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I've uploaded a couple of past paper questions for the Hormones and menstrual cycle topic (B11.6). I've also included the mark scheme, which has been edited so that it is student friendly (mark schemes are quite difficult to interpret). Thought this might be useful as a review task that students can self/peer assess. This is a complimentary resource, if you wish to purchase i have also designed a lesson for this topic simply search ' AQA new specification-Hormones and the menstrual cycle-B11.6' Good luck with your lesson!