Whole school fluency map, fluency grids for year groups, fluency grids for parents, other resources

Whole school fluency map, fluency grids for year groups, fluency grids for parents, other resources

These resources are designed to promote the teaching and learning of basic number facts across primary school. If children are fluent they do not need to keep going back to inefficient counting methods! Many of the fluency skills promoted here may be the same in Key Stage 1 as they are in Key Stage 2. This is because for many children it is just as important to learn root addition and subtraction facts in Year 6 as it is in Year 1. These number facts will support children when facing the very large numbers they have to deal with at primary school, so it is well worth promoting fluency across your school...and I'm not just talking multiplication tables! Everything is fully editable, so adapt it to make it work for your school. Resources included: A whole school fluency map, showing the number facts that must be learned from Y1 to Y6 ( a lot of skills are repeated across every year group. This is intentional! Fluency guides for each year group, linked to the whole school map Fluency guides for parents (please make sure you send out with the 'addition and subtraction roots on one page' document copied onto the back of the sheet) Addition root facts Subtraction root facts Optional reward chart for parents to use at home, linked to parent guides Multiplication facts pre and post assessment sheet Division facts pre and post assessment sheet In the zip folder: Multiplication and division - bronze, silver and gold timed challenges, including medal chart and medals. We give out a times tables wristband anytime a child gets a gold medal - this has proved a big hit. Bronze - times table in order, 30 seconds Silver - times table out of sequence, 40 seconds Gold - times table with division facts, 80 seconds Good luck! I hope your fluency work has a positive impact on mathematics teaching and learning at your school. And remember explicit teaching of fluency skills is just as important as practising and rapid recall.
extra golden-time
Fronted adverbials, adverbs, interactive dice games and presentation

Fronted adverbials, adverbs, interactive dice games and presentation

This one works a treat! Fronted adverbials should now be taught from Year 3 upwards and this is a useful way in - it will also stretch talented KS2 writers. This dice-based activity encourages children to add a wide variety of fronted adverbials to a main clause. The game is differentiated into three different versions. In its simplest version, less confident writers can pick appropriate adverbs to open sentences. In the most challenging version writers must elaborate and include more than one adverbial before the main clause. This can produce some stunning sentence work. My class have been able to apply this skill in their own writing and I'm sure yours will too. There is a presentation to provide your class (or any less confident teachers) with the knowledge needed to use the activity creatively. NEW! I have added a new game 'Warrior Swords!' to develop the skill of varying the length of fronted adverbials. It is more challenging than the other 3 versions attached. I hope you find the games as useful as I have.
extra golden-time
Persuasive writing and balanced discussion, dice games, model texts, planning frames, toolkits

Persuasive writing and balanced discussion, dice games, model texts, planning frames, toolkits

Orally rehearse the language of persuasive writing and balanced discussion before writing. Throughout Key Stage 2, children are expected to take part in debates and compose one-sided arguments or balanced discussions. To be successful at this, children need plenty of opportunities to use the language of argument. Connecting phrases such as 'it is obvious that', 'other people claim that' and 'opponents of' need to be orally rehearsed as children do not encounter them regularly in their daily lives. This fully planned session, complete with a presentation and a fun dice game, will give children the experience of using the language of argument in a purposeful way. Use this session prior to any 'argument' style writing and it will give children the tools to be successful. *I have now added 'Whose side are you on? Advanced'. This version is for 4 players and enables children to create full balanced discussions orally. The patterns they use exactly mirror the structure of a written balanced discussion. **I have also added a model text, a planning frame and a self assessment sheet for persuasive writing and a model text, a planning frame and a self assessment sheet for discussion writing. ***I have also added: a one sided model text in favour of Victorian style child punishment (for children to argue against!) a one sided model against mobile phones in school for children to argue 'for' a mobile phone fact or opinion sorting activity a one sided model for animals in circuses for children to argue against a one sided argument against computer games for children to argue 'for' a computer games counter argument activity a computer games fact or opinion sorting activity a for and against sorting activity linked with space a for and against sorting activity linked with aliens
extra golden-time
Explanation writing, causal connectives, fun dice activity, 'Explain yourself', warm ups, models

Explanation writing, causal connectives, fun dice activity, 'Explain yourself', warm ups, models

Explanation writing is one of the trickier non-fiction genres in the primary curriculum. Although we rarely explain sequences using formal language, we often explain things in every day terms. How do you complete that level of the game? How do you do that magic trick? How do we digest food? There is a group of words and phrases that can help explain cause and effect more precisely. These can be called 'causal connectives'. This is not a strictly defined group of words – more collection of conjunctions, adverbs and other cohesive devices that can be useful for this genre of writing. Try the dice activity 'Explain yourself' and watch your class get comfortable using these connectives aloud as they explain diverse subjects including 'how to take the perfect selfie' and 'how the digestive system works'. When they are ready, they can write some of their favourite explanations, using causal connectives with accuracy. NEW! I have now added 4 simple oral warm up activities. These encourage to children to rehearse useful vocabulary (consequently, as a result of this, so, so that, therefore, however) and add brackets to explanation sentences. Try that tricky language aloud before you get into any writing! I have also added 7 model explanations to give some ideas of things to write about.
extra golden-time
Growth mindset, 6 editable posters, pupil questionnaire, pupil response sheet

Growth mindset, 6 editable posters, pupil questionnaire, pupil response sheet

This resource is designed to support learning about growth mindsets in primary schools. It includes 6 growth mindset posters. These are saved as jpegs and as a powerpoint, so that you can edit them to meet your own needs. It also includes a pupil questionnaire made up of 11 questions in a powerpoint, so that you can assess the impacts of raising awareness of mindsets in your school. Use it before you start any work on mindsets, and then again at the end of the year. There is a pupil response sheet too, to make data analysis easy. I used this across Year 5, as a sample group, but I think it could be used across the primary age range.
extra golden-time
Apostrophe Abduction - possessive apostrophes, contractions, plural nouns, differentiated games

Apostrophe Abduction - possessive apostrophes, contractions, plural nouns, differentiated games

Lesson plan, presentation and all resources for the two dice games (the main game is differentiated 3 ways) included. Ready to go! Apostrophes! Why do so many of us get them wrong? In Year 2 children are expected to use contractions accurately, and in Year 4 they are expected to understand possessive apostrophes as well. This is a carefully planned lesson about apostrophes for Years 4, 5 or 6. It would also be an ideal revision tool for the Year 6 Grammar Test. First, children are given the chance to revisit prior learning through the fun warm up game 'The Memory Test'. Following that, they will learn about possessive apostrophes and common misconceptions during the presentation. When they are ready, the two player game 'Apostrophe Abduction' will provide them with plenty of challenge or support, depending on the version you give them. I have included three versions of the game : A 'support' version - this game uses a very short text, with only 10 highlighted apostrophe words to focus on. An 'on track' version - children have to hunt for plurals, possessive apostrophes and contractions. A challenge version - the same as the 'on track' version, but across a full story - quite a challenge to find every plural, contraction and possessive apostrophe.
extra golden-time
Colon to introduce a list, dice game, fiction and non-fiction, differentiated 3 ways

Colon to introduce a list, dice game, fiction and non-fiction, differentiated 3 ways

I can use a colon to introduce a list (when the clause before the list is independent) This fun dice game gives children lots of opportunities to use a colon to introduce a list. I have included three versions of the game, to ensure that all learners are included and challenged appropriately. On track version: In pairs, use the on track dice guide. As players progress in the game, they must shade one colon on their game board for every item (or noun phrase) they include in each list. The first player to reach the finish is the winner. Support version: In pairs, children use the support dice guide. During each round both players create a list sentence, using the opening clause on the dice guide, and a list of noun phrases. There are visual prompts on the dice guide to support writers with ideas. Challenge version: Use the ‘on track’ dice guide, but ask the children to experiment with lists made up of expanded noun phrases that include commas, wherever possible. They can try using semi-colons to separate the items in each list. Example of a sentence that could be created by playing this dice game at challenge level: To create her magic potion she needed the following: wild mushrooms, from the lower field; oak bark, from the oldest tree in Western Wood; three long, white feathers and a twist of fresh sap, not more than a day old. Your class will soon get the hang of colons to introduce lists if you play this for a session.
extra golden-time
Use relative pronouns, fun dice game: 'Meet the relatives', write relative clauses

Use relative pronouns, fun dice game: 'Meet the relatives', write relative clauses

I can use the relative pronouns ‘who’, ‘which’, ‘where’, ‘when’, ‘whose’ and ‘that’ to write relative clauses. Specific relative pronouns are used when referring to different nouns. The fun dice game 'Meet the relatives' encourages children to think about which relative pronoun is most suitable for the noun in the sentence. The aim of the game is to be the first player to write an embedded relative clause using each of the relative pronouns on the game card. There are three versions of the game, to ensure that all learners are included and appropriately challenged. Enjoy meeting the relatives!
extra golden-time
Fully planned and resourced 3 week English unit, KS2, Beowulf, writing a legend

Fully planned and resourced 3 week English unit, KS2, Beowulf, writing a legend

Here is my most successful unit! Every year, children produce fantastic writing. I have used it in Year 5, but it could be easily adapted for use in any Key Stage 2 class. Although Morpurgo's version of the classic poem is fantastic, this unit is based on a very short, simplified version of Beowulf (written as a story), which can be read quickly and used as a model for children's writing. There is still plenty of rich vocabulary and figurative language to explore. This carefully planned unit is three weeks long and follows the 'Talk for Writing' approach. Firtsly, children learn the story through a series of drama activities. Later on in the unit, they change the story, and retell it from the monster's perspective - great fun! Finally, they create a legend of their own, using the pattern of Beowulf - a 'defeating the monster' pattern. Of course, there is plenty of grammar, comprehension and vocabulary work included throughout (all in the ZIP folder). Many sessions and writing tasks (including the final outcome) are differentiated, for mixed ability classes. I have also given suggested passages for whole class shared writing - an essential part of teaching writing. This unit is ready to go. Creative teachers will enjoy getting stuck-in to this one.
extra golden-time
Mission Control - an exciting way to learn about questions, statements and commands

Mission Control - an exciting way to learn about questions, statements and commands

From Year 2 onwards children are expected to understand and compose statements, commands and questions as part of their understanding of grammar and punctuation. Bring this dry subject matter to life by playing 'Mission Control'. Why should a fun games-based approach only be used in mathematics? This resource has everything you need: full lesson plan with differentiation; PowerPoint to support direct teaching; fully resourced game. Just add 1-6 die and you are ready for blast off. 10...9...8...7...
extra golden-time
Use a colon to explain and add detail, dice game, 'Creepy crawly colon sentences'

Use a colon to explain and add detail, dice game, 'Creepy crawly colon sentences'

Assessment focus I can use colons to explain and add detail (description: detail) I can use colon sentences in non-fiction writing Colons can be used for various purposes (before lists, introducing quotes), but this activity focuses on the use of the colon to separate two main clauses. By playing this dice game, children get plenty of opportunities to practise this skill, whilst finding out about some very creepy creatures. There is also a version of the activity for learners that need a lot of support, and an explanation of what to do with your high attaining writers. Enjoy!
extra golden-time
addition and subtraction facts, root facts, fluency, two grids

addition and subtraction facts, root facts, fluency, two grids

All maths teachers, regardless of the age they teach, know how important it is for children to be fluent in their root addition and subtraction facts. I couldn't find them as a word document anywhere, so I made these two simple grids. They can be used in so many ways, for teaching, practising and assessing how children are doing with their basic number facts.
extra golden-time
Paragraph Party! Grouping information, organise paragraphs, fun whole class activity, football

Paragraph Party! Grouping information, organise paragraphs, fun whole class activity, football

This is a fun and engaging whole class activity about organisation within a paragraph. Using a non-fiction context (information about football) pupils go to a paragraph party. They have to work out who is hosting the party (the topic sentence), who is the uninvited guest (information that doesn't belong) and various other activities. In short, it's a lively and memorable way of exploring non-fiction paragraphs.
extra golden-time
Paragraph Party! Organisation within a paragraph, fun whole class activity, space

Paragraph Party! Organisation within a paragraph, fun whole class activity, space

This is a fun and engaging whole class activity about organisation within a paragraph. Using a non-fiction context (information about space) pupils go to a paragraph party. They have to work out who is hosting the party (the topic sentence), who is the uninvited guest (information that doesn't belong) and various other activities. In short, it's a lively and memorable way of exploring non-fiction paragraphs.
extra golden-time
spell ie and ei words, dice game: 'Follow the rule/break the rule', i before e except after c

spell ie and ei words, dice game: 'Follow the rule/break the rule', i before e except after c

I can spell ‘ie’ and ‘ei’ words Lots of children (and adults) get mixed-up when spelling 'ie' and 'ei' words. Is the rule 'i before e except after c' actually helpful? This dice game encourages children to explore the rule and decide for themselves. Here are some words that keep to the rule: field, shield, brief, chief, belief, believe, unbelievable, relief, relieved, piece, achieve receive, conceit, deceive, deceit, conceive, misconceive, perceive, perceivable, ceiling, receipt Here are some that don't: neighbour, weigh, counterfeit, foreign, kaleidoscope, their, caffeine, leisure, protein, seize, weird ancient, deficient, glacier, proficient, society, science, sufficient, species Play the game ‘Follow the rule/break the rule’, classifying words into two groups. After the game, the class could consider if this rule may work best: “i before e except after c, but only if it rhymes with a bee!”
extra golden-time