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Planning

Children should come to school and love being there! Innovation, engagement and excitement should be the hallmarks of their learning. They should be given skills and tools which will allow them to become better prepared for life in an uncertain future. Having a purpose to their learning and knowing why they are learning something are also integral to their formative education. And remember, it isn't only the children who need to be engaged - so do you! I hope these plans help to achieve this.

Children should come to school and love being there! Innovation, engagement and excitement should be the hallmarks of their learning. They should be given skills and tools which will allow them to become better prepared for life in an uncertain future. Having a purpose to their learning and knowing why they are learning something are also integral to their formative education. And remember, it isn't only the children who need to be engaged - so do you! I hope these plans help to achieve this.
Year 6 History WW1 unit
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Year 6 History WW1 unit

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This unit is designed for year 6. The unit focuses on WW1 – paying particular attention to the main participants, military innovation and key dates. Throughout this unit, children will spend time learning the geography of the different empires. They will also learn how to carry out different types of historical research; develop their understanding of the weapons used to fight WW1; better understand the Treaty of Versailles and the role it played in WW2. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: To know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; achievements and follies of mankind To gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’ and ‘civilisation’ Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses. Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed. Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. Lesson 1: A Chronology lesson which uses photographic evidence to give the children a deeper understanding of how and why different periods/peoples in time were so different. Children make links between different time periods as they start to use the language of chronology. Lesson 2: Children use atlases and maps to gain a better understanding of the different countries and empires involved in WW1. Lesson 3/4: Children work together to collaboratively research some of the major events of WW1. They also spend time researching some of the key technologies which were vital to the War. Lesson 5: Children learn more about the key weapons used to fight WW1 whilst also making decisions about the effectiveness of these methods of warfare. Lesson 6: Children create a multimedia presentation by researching the lives of different people living through that time. Lesson 7. Children research different reasons why WW1 started so they can engage in a class debate. Lesson 8: Children work in teams to compete in a game which helps them better understand the importance of the Treaty of Versailles. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Mystery Story Writing Unit
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Mystery Story Writing Unit

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This English unit is designed for year 4. The unit requires at least one copy of the book ‘Thieves of Ostia’ by Caroline Lawrence. The aim is for the children to write a Roman mystery story based on the text. The unit allows the children the opportunity to become more familiar with crime/mystery stories and their composition. It also gives the children the chance to take solve an actual classroom mystery. This unit is very specific and detailed when it comes to the planning and writing stages (a modelled write is included in the plan). It also develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Writing (composition): (Vocabulary, grammar, punctuation): ○ using fronted adverbials (prepositional phrases) ○ using commas after fronted adverbials ○ using and punctuating direct speech ● Plan their writing by: ○ discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar ○ discussing and recording ideas ● Draft and write by: ○ composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures ○ organising paragraphs around a theme ○ creating settings, characters and plot ● Evaluate and edit by: ○ assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements ○ proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences ○ reading their own writing aloud, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear ● Proofread for spelling and punctuation errors This is a 4 week unit which includes 14 separate lessons/activities. However, some of these lessons will often need more than a single lesson to complete (particularly the writing and planning sections). Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 4 History Ancient Greeks Unit
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Year 4 History Ancient Greeks Unit

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This unit is designed for year 4 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. The unit focuses on the classical period of Ancient Greece. Throughout this unit, children will spend time learning what an archaeologist does. They will also learn how to carry out different types of historical research; develop their understanding of triremes and hoplites; Use Google Apps to become more familiar with the region; Better understand leadership by understanding Pericles and use historical artefacts to make inferences about the time. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: To know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; achievements and follies of mankind To gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’ and ‘civilisation’ Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses. Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed. Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. Lesson 1: A Chronology lesson which uses photographic evidence to give the children a deeper understanding of how and why different periods/peoples in time were so different. Children make links between different time periods as they start to use the language of chronology. Lesson 2: Children learn why the Ancient Greek gods were so important to the Ancient Greeks. Lesson 3: Children use a Google App to better explore the physical geography of Greece and Ancient Greek city states. Lesson 4/5: Children take the role of an Archaeologist to better understand the Ancient Greeks. Lesson 6: A research activity where the children are given the opportunity to discover more about Ancient Greek warfare and its importance to the Greeks. Lesson 7. A practical activity where the children make choices about which Greek city state they would prefer to be a part of. Lesson 8: Children work in teams to compete in a game which helps them better understand the importance of Pericles, democracy and leadership. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 3 History Egyptians Unit
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Year 3 History Egyptians Unit

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This unit is designed for year 3 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. The unit focuses on the time of the Ancient Egyptians – paying particular attention to settlement and the physical geography of the Nile. Throughout this unit, children will spend time learning what an archaeologist does. They will also learn how to carry out different types of historical research; develop their understanding of the Egyptian farming cycle; Use Google Apps to become more familiar with the region; Use historical artefacts to make inferences about the time. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: To know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; achievements and follies of mankind To gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’ and ‘civilisation’ Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses. Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed. Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. Lesson 1: A Chronology lesson which uses photographic evidence to give the children a deeper understanding of how and why different periods/peoples in time were so different. Children make links between different time periods as they start to use the language of chronology. Lesson 2: Children use artefacts to develop their ideas about the Ancient Egyptians. Lesson 3: Children use a Google App to better explore the physical geography of Egypt. Lesson 4: Children research the Egyptian farming cycle then use multimedia to present their findings. Lesson 5: A practical activity where the children take the role of an Egyptologist. Lesson 6. Children work collaboratively to better understand why ancient people decided to settle where they did. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 4 English Newspaper Writing Unit
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Year 4 English Newspaper Writing Unit

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This English unit is designed for year 4. The unit requires at least one copy of the book ‘Thieves of Ostia’ by Caroline Lawrence. The aim is for the children to write two newspaper articles based on the text. The unit allows the children the opportunity to become more familiar with newspaper reports and their composition. It also gives the children the chance to role-play newspaper reporters and eye-witnesses. It also develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Writing (composition): Plan their writing by: i.Discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar ii. Discussing and recording ideas Draft and write by: i. Organising paragraphs around a theme ii. In non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices Evaluate and edit writing by: i. Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements ii. Proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences Writing (Vocabulary, grammar, punctuation) i. Extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although ii. Using and punctuating direct speech This is a 2/3 week unit which includes 9 separate lessons/activities. However, some of these lessons will often need more than a single lesson to complete (particularly the writing and planning sections). Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 4 Mythical Story Writing Unit
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Year 4 Mythical Story Writing Unit

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This English unit is designed for year 4. The unit requires at least one version of the myth ‘Midas and the Golden Touch’. The aim is for the children to write a mythical story based on an edited version of the Greek myth – King Midas. The unit allows the children the opportunity to become more familiar with mythical stories and their composition. It also gives the children the opportunity to role-play, read and immerse themselves in a variety of different mythical stories. This unit is very specific and detailed when it comes to the planning and writing stages (a modelled write is included in the plan). It also develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Writing (Composition): Plan their writing by: i. discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar ii. discussing and recording ideas Draft and write by: i. composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures ii. organising paragraphs around a theme in narratives, creating settings, characters and plot iii. using commas after fronted adverbials develop their understanding of the Vocabulary, grammar and punctuation by: i. choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition ii. extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although iii. using fronted adverbials Evaluate and edit by: i. assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements ii. proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences iii. proofread for spelling and punctuation errors iv. read their own writing aloud, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear. This is a 3/4-week unit which includes 12 separate lessons/activities. However, some of these lessons will often need more than a single lesson to complete (particularly the writing and planning sections). Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
RE Hinduism Unit on Good, Evil and Diwali
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RE Hinduism Unit on Good, Evil and Diwali

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This unit is designed for year 4 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. Ultimately the unit is focused around the concept of ‘Good’ and ‘Evil’ and its link to the Hindu festival of Diwali. In this unit, children will spend time learning to discuss what ‘Good’ and ‘Evil’ are and how these concepts are linked to Hinduism. It develops the following skills: Children can express a personal response to the concept of good and evil. Children can describe how the concept can be applied in their own and others’ lives. Children can describe what ‘Good and Evil’ means. Children can describe how Good and Evil is expressed by Hindus in the festival of Diwali. Children describe the value, for Hindus, of recognising good and evil through celebration. Lesson 1: Children discuss the concept of Good and Evil Lesson 2: Children use examples and work in teams to better explain the impact of Good and Evil. Lesson 3: Children learn about Diwali and its link to Good and Evil. Lesson 4: Children use what they have learned to take part in a debate on the relevance of Good and Evil to Diwali. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Guided Reading Lesson Planning Template
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Guided Reading Lesson Planning Template

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This resource is designed to be used for any Key Stage 2 (possibly Key Stage 1) guided reading lessons/activities. It can be used for every guided reading activity and is designed to be used in the following way: Print out a copy of the sheet. The person planning the guided reading activity should follow the instructions on the guided reading activity sheet. Make notes at the bottom of the sheet about the session based on the reading skills focus. Keep the sheet for assessment purposes. This guided reading resource is an easy way to plan, monitor and assess the reading strategies, fluency and skills of any child taking part in small guided reading sessions.
Year One history unit on Old and New
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Year One history unit on Old and New

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This unit is designed for year 1. This unit introduces children to some of the key vocabulary they will need to better understand the past. It uses ‘toys, cartoons and stories to consolidate this understanding. Also, there is a focus on the meaning of ‘exploration’ and ‘invention’. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Pupils should develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented. Changes within living memory - Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life Lesson 1: Children are introduced to age appropriate historical vocabulary through the use of photographs. Lesson 2: A practical activity where the children learn about invention and exploration. Lesson 3: Children further develop their understanding of historical vocabulary through cartoons. Lesson 4: Children use a story to further focus in on what the difference between old and new is. Lesson 5: Children use artefacts (toys) to build their understanding of the past. Lesson 6: Now the children switch their focus to the future and compare with the past and now. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 4 Lorax Playscript Unit
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Year 4 Lorax Playscript Unit

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This English unit is designed for year 4. The unit requires at least one copy of the book ‘The Lorax’ by Doctor Seuss. The aim is for the children to rewrite the book as a playscript which will then be acted out to a live audience. The unit allows the children the opportunity to become more familiar with playscripts and their composition. It also gives the children the chance to read in character as well as role-play the parts of the different characters involved in the book. It also develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Develop positive attitudes to reading, and an understanding of what they read, by: • Preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action Writing (composition): • discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar • discussing and recording ideas Draft and write by: • composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures • in narratives, creating settings, characters and plot Evaluate and edit by: • assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements • proofread for spelling and punctuation errors • read their own writing aloud, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear. Indicate grammatical and other features by: • using commas after fronted adverbials This is a 2/3-week unit which includes 10 separate lessons/activities. However, some of these lessons will often need more than a single lesson to complete (particularly the writing and planning sections). Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
RE Finding out about Hinduism Unit
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RE Finding out about Hinduism Unit

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This unit is designed for year 4 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. Ultimately the unit is focused on children researching ‘Hinduism’ and the various different aspects which help to differentiate Hinduism from other religions. It develops the following skills: Children can provide a personalised summary on the religion of Hinduism. Children can describe some of the key aspects of Hinduism. Children describe the value, for Hindus, of some of the key parts of Hinduism i.e. festivals, place of worship, sacred text and inspirational leader. Lesson 1: Children are introduced to the term ‘religion’ and what makes up a religion. Lesson 2-5: Children are provided with a research challenge where they must find out as much as possible about certain aspects of the religion. Lesson 3: Children present their understanding of the religion to an audience. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 4 Science Unit on Habitats
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Year 4 Science Unit on Habitats

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This unit is designed for year 4 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. Ultimately the unit is focused on better understanding different animals and plants and the positives and negatives of natural and artificial habitats. In this unit, children will spend time classifying different animals/plants, creating their own habitats, debating the positive and negative aspects of artificial habitats. It develops the following skills: • Using and making simple guides or keys [sorting, grouping, comparing, classifying] to explore and identify plants and animals. • Making a guide [sorting, grouping, comparing, classifying] to local living things. • Raising and answering questions based on their observations of animals and what they have found out about other animals that they have researched. Lesson 1: Children build classification keys to better understand different animals and plants Lesson 2: Children learn about different habitats and learn to distinguish between them Lesson 3: Children create their own zoo and debate the ethics of zoos as habitats for animals Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 2 History Neil Armstrong unit
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Year 2 History Neil Armstrong unit

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This unit is designed for year 2 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. Ultimately the unit is focused on the life of Neil Armstrong but it brings in the idea of exploration, the space race and animal rights. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Pupils develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented. Changes within living memory. The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods Different significant historical events. Lesson 1: A Chronology lesson which uses photographic evidence to give the children a deeper understanding of how and why different periods/peoples in time were so different. Children make links between different time periods as they start to use the language of chronology. Lesson 2: A Practical and engaging lesson which introduces the concept of exploration. Children solve puzzles, challenges and other activities which will allow them to reach a place which is difficult to get to. Lesson 3: A practical and fun lesson which explores the Space Race and what it would be like to be part of the Space Race. Lesson 4: This lesson involves animal in space and whether it was right or wrong to send them into space. Lesson 5: A research activity where the children are given the opportunity to discover more about the importance of Space Exploration and the life of Neil Armstrong. They are also given the opportunity to present their findings to the whole class! Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 4 Setting Description Unit
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Year 4 Setting Description Unit

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This English unit is designed for year 4. The unit requires at least one copy of the book ‘How to live forever plan’ by Colin Thompson’. The aim is for the children to write a setting description based on the book. The unit allows the children the opportunity to become more familiar with setting descriptions and develop their understanding of how to use powerful vocabulary. It also gives the children the chance to create setting descriptions using the ‘journey of the eye’ method. It also develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Writing (Vocabulary, grammar, punctuation): • choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition • use and understand the grammatical terminology accurately and appropriately in discussing their writing and reading. Writing (composition): Plan their writing by: • discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar • discussing and recording ideas Draft and write by: • composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures • in narratives, creating settings, characters and plot Evaluate and edit by: • assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements • proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences • proofread for spelling and punctuation errors This is a 2-week unit which includes 8 separate lessons/activities. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 2 Great Fire of London
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Year 2 Great Fire of London

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This unit is designed for year 2 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. Ultimately the unit is focused around Great Fire of London and those who could have been responsible for causing the fire. Throughout this unit, children will spend time learning how to carry out different types of historical research; present arguments based on historical evidence; question sources and work collaboratively. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Pupils develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented. Changes within living memory. The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods Different significant historical events. Lesson 1: A Chronology lesson which uses photographic evidence to give the children a deeper understanding of how and why different periods/peoples in time were so different. Children make links between different time periods as they start to use the language of chronology. Lesson 2: Children identify the main events connected to the GFL and make initial decisions about who might be responsible for starting it. Lesson 3: Children are introduced to different sources of historical evidence for the GFL. They learn how to use these sources of evidence to carry out historical research. Lesson 4: Children use sources and research to make decisions about the GFL. Lesson 5 - 7: Children present their findings on the GFL through a dramatized role play. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 5 History Vikings Plan
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Year 5 History Vikings Plan

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This unit is designed for year 5 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. The unit focuses on the Vikings as raiders – paying particular attention to their methods of travel and way of life. Throughout this unit, children will spend time learning about raiding and settlement. They will also learn how to carry out different types of historical research; develop their understanding of bias/historical interpretation. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: To know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; achievements and follies of mankind Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses. Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed. Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. Lesson 1: A Chronology lesson which uses photographic evidence to give the children a deeper understanding of how and why different periods/peoples in time were so different. Children make links between different time periods as they start to use the language of chronology. Lesson 2: A practical activity which gives the children a deeper understanding of the ‘Viking Raids’ on Britain. Lesson 3: Children look more closely at the Viking Raid on Lindisfarne and the different Historical interpretations of the raid. Lesson 4/5: A research activity where the children are given the opportunity to discover more about the Vikings – and whether they were just bloodthirsty raiders. Lesson 6/7: Children present their findings (to their own questions) on the Vikings through multimedia presentations. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 4 Ice Trap Poetry Writing Unit
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Year 4 Ice Trap Poetry Writing Unit

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This English unit is designed for year 4. The unit requires at least one copy of the book ‘Ice Trap’ by Meredith Hooper. The aim is for the children to write a poem based on the book Ice Trap. The unit allows the children the opportunity to become more familiar with different forms of poetry and their composition. It also gives the children the chance to role-play the parts the journey of Ernest Shackleton and experiment with different poetic devices. It also develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Develop positive attitudes to reading, and an understanding of what they read, by: • Listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks • Recognising some different forms of poetry • Identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning Writing (Composition): Plan their writing by: • discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar • discussing and recording ideas Draft and write by: • composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures Evaluate and edit by: • assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements • proofread for spelling and punctuation errors • read their own writing aloud, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear. This is a 3-week unit which includes 10 separate lessons/activities. However, some of these lessons will often need more than a single lesson to complete (particularly the writing and planning sections). Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 3 History Stone Age unit
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Year 3 History Stone Age unit

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This unit is designed for year 3 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. The unit focuses on giving the student’s a better understanding of the Stone Age and what made the Stone Age so different to other time periods. Throughout this unit, children will spend time learning what it was like to be a person living in the Stone Age. They will also learn how to carry out different types of historical research; develop their understanding of the time based on historical evidence/lack of historical evidence and work collaboratively. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: Know and understand history as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped Britain has influenced. To know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world. Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses. Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed. Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. Lesson 1: A Chronology lesson which uses photographic evidence to give the children a deeper understanding of how and why different periods/peoples in time were so different. Children make links between different time periods as they start to use the language of chronology. Lesson 2: Children work in teams to compete in a Stone Age game which helps them better understand whether it was better to be a hunter gatherer or a farmer. Lesson 3: A practical activity which helps them to understand why the Stone Age was so different to other times. Lesson 4: A discussion based lesson on the beliefs of Stone Age people. Lesson 5: A research activity where the children are given the opportunity to discover more about a major Stone Age site. Lesson 6. Children use photographic evidence to better understand the Stone Age. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.
Year 4 History Roman Invasion Unit
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Year 4 History Roman Invasion Unit

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This unit is designed for year 4 but could be adapted to fit into other year groups. The unit focuses on the Romans and their invasion of Britain – paying particular attention to religion, military innovation, reasons for invasion and size of the Roman Empire. Throughout this unit, children will spend time learning what an archaeologist does. They will also learn how to carry out different types of historical research; Develop their own questions to find out more about areas of Roman life; Develop their understanding of Roman and Celtic life and understand invasion and the positive/negative consequences of it. It develops the following skills and knowledge from the National Curriculum: To know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; achievements and follies of mankind To gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’ and ‘civilisation’ Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses. Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed. Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. Lesson 1: A Chronology lesson which uses photographic evidence to give the children a deeper understanding of how and why different periods/peoples in time were so different. Children make links between different time periods as they start to use the language of chronology. Lesson 2: Children take the role of Archaeologists to better understand the uses of different Roman artefacts. Lesson 3: A practical activity which gives the children a deeper understanding of the ‘Roman invasion’ of Britain. Lesson 4: Children gain a better understanding of the size and geography of the Roman Empire. Lesson 5: Children create their own questions to gain further understanding of the reasons why the Romans wanted to invade Britain. Lesson 6/7. A research activity where the children are given the opportunity to discover more about the Roman and (British) Celt’s way of life. Within this unit plan there are hyperlinks to other resources associated with the plan.