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I am a teacher specialising in Geography and Religious Studies with over 4 years experience to date. I pride myself on designing lessons that engages students in their learning, with an enquiry-based focus being at the forefront. Any lesson that you download is fully resourced and differentiated ready to use in a flash. I hope they make a real contributing to your own classroom like they have done to mine.

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I am a teacher specialising in Geography and Religious Studies with over 4 years experience to date. I pride myself on designing lessons that engages students in their learning, with an enquiry-based focus being at the forefront. Any lesson that you download is fully resourced and differentiated ready to use in a flash. I hope they make a real contributing to your own classroom like they have done to mine.
How Did Aristotle Distinguish Between The Body And Soul
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How Did Aristotle Distinguish Between The Body And Soul

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on Aristotle’s philosophical distinction between the body and soul. The main part of the lesson involves students having to make an educated guess on his viewpoint through an introductory quote, followed by students creating their own diagram to show Aristotle’s philosophical viewpoint, then they complete a Venn diagram comparing this view with that of Plato, before finally creating a mind map on the reasons why Richard Dawkins rejects any notion of an immortal soul. Learning Objectives: To outline Aristotle’s distinction between the body and soul. To compare the similarities and differences with Plato’s view of the soul. To assess the philosophical opinions for the rejection of the existence of a soul.
Christian Charities
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Christian Charities

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the work of Christian charities. The main part of the lesson consists of an information gathering and consolidation carousel group task (based on four charities, including Barnando's and the Salvation Army) and evaluating which cause they believe is worthy of support, linking their answer to Christian views towards charity and wealth. Learning Objectives for the lesson are as follows: To describe the aims of different Christian charities. To explain why their work is important. To evaluate which cause you believe is particularly worthy.
Poverty in the UK
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Poverty in the UK

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the causes and effects of poverty in the UK. In the main part of the lesson students have to use a set of images to describe the impacts of poverty and then use annotate an A3 sheet with the different reasons why poverty exists in the UK today. Finally students have to come up with their own suggestions as to how poverty in the UK could be tackled. Learning Objectives: To describe the impacts of poverty in the UK. To explain the reasons why we see poverty in the UK. To begin to suggest your own solutions to poverty in the UK.
How Can The Impacts Of Earthquakes Be Mitigated
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How Can The Impacts Of Earthquakes Be Mitigated

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on how the impacts of earthquakes can be mitigated. Focused on the 3Ps, the main part of the lesson involves a discussion task on the difference between the three approaches and the techniques it might involve, leading up to an extended note taking task on how the different techniques can help to mitigate the impacts of an earthquake. Learning Objectives: To describe the different approaches to mitigating the impacts of earthquakes. To explain how these approaches work in practice. To evaluate the effectiveness of these approaches.
What Is The Prime Mover
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What Is The Prime Mover

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on Aristotle's concept of the Prime Mover. The main part of the lesson involves students generating examples to show their understanding of potentiality and actuality, a class discussion and note-taking exercise on why Aristotle believed the Prime Mover had to exist, a worksheet where students have to explain why Aristotle believed the Prime Mover had to possess certain attributes, develop explanations of key problems associated with the Prime Mover, and finally an extended writing exercise where they justify what they find to be the two most convincing criticisms of Aristotle's theory of the Four Causes. Learning Objectives: To understand the idea of potentiality and actuality. To outline Aristotle’s concept of the Prime Mover. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of Aristotle’s theory of the Four Causes.
The Beatitudes
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The Beatitudes

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the Beatitudes. In the main part of the lesson students have to write a modern day translation for each one, explain why they are important in pairs and write an extended analysis of how they could be applied in someone's life. Learning Objectives: To describe the meaning of the Beatitudes. To explain why they are important for Christians. To analyse how these could be followed by people in their own lives.
OCR AS Philosophy Complete Syllabus
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OCR AS Philosophy Complete Syllabus

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This contains a set of fully resourced, differentiated lessons to cover the entire OCR AS Philosophy syllabus. Theme 1 - Philosophical Language And Thought It was taught in the following order: What Is Plato’s Analogy Of The Cave? How Valid Is Plato’s Analogy Of The Cave? What Is Plato’s Theory Of The Forms? What Are Aristotle’s Four Causes? What Is Aristotle’s Prime Mover? How Did Plato Distinguish Between The Body And Soul? How Did Aristotle Distinguish Between The Body And Soul? How Did Descartes Distinguish Between The Mind And Soul? Theme 2 - The Existence Of God It was taught in the following order: What Is The Teleological Argument? How Can The Teleological Argument Be Challenged? What Is The Cosmological Argument? What Is The Ontological Argument? Does The Ontological Argument Work? Theme 3 - God And The World It was taught in the following order: What Are Religious Experiences? Do Religious Experiences Prove The Existence of God? How Can The Validity Of Religious Experiences Be Challenged? How Is The Problem Of Evil A Challenge To The Existence Of God? Does The Augustinian Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil? Does The Irenaean Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil?
Revelation of God
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Revelation of God

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on how theists claim that God can be revealed to humanity (this includes general revelation and special revelation). The main part of the lesson consists of a class discussion task on the two groups of revelation (general and special), a picture sorting task where they sort different types into general revelation or special revelation, a written task where they become an 'expert' on one type of revelation, a peer teaching task and an exam question plenary. This lesson is aimed at the new 2016 AQA Religious Studies unit. It does require reference to the old AQA Philosophy textbook for the written task. Learning Objectives: To describe the different types of revelation. To explain their key characteristics. To analyse the validity of these types of revelation.
What On Earth Is A Human Being
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What On Earth Is A Human Being

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on what makes us truly human. The main part of the lesson involves students working in pairs to describe characteristics that make us human (table outline provided), using a clip to add further ideas, then finally completing a piece of writing on what they believe is the most important thing that makes us human. Learning Objectives: To describe the different characteristics that makes us human. To explain your viewpoint on what makes us human.
How Did Plato Distinguish Between The Body And Soul
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How Did Plato Distinguish Between The Body And Soul

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on Plato's dualistic distinction between the body and soul. The main part of the lesson involves note-taking and discussion tasks on the different philosophical distinctions between the body and soul, an information comprehension exercise on Plato's approach, and lastly peer teaching of Plato's rationalist arguments for an independent soul from the body (which includes analysis and ranking). Learning Objectives: To outline the key philosophical views on the distinction between the body and soul. To explain Plato’s distinction between the body and the soul. To examine the credibility of Plato’s arguments.
How Can Symbols Be Used On A O.S. Map
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How Can Symbols Be Used On A O.S. Map

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on being able to recognise map symbols on Ordnance Survey maps. The main part of the lesson involves a worksheet task, map assessment task and brief discussion as to why the use of map symbols is important. The plenary involves a game of bingo. Learning Objectives: To identify what a symbol is. To recognise symbols commonly shown on a O.S. map. To demonstrate an understanding why O.S. map symbols are used.
Arguments For The Existence Of God Revision Lesson
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Arguments For The Existence Of God Revision Lesson

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated revision lesson on arguments for the existence of God, namely the Teleological Argument, Cosmological Argument and Ontological Argument. Main activities in the lesson include a mind mapping task and an essay planning task. It is designed to support the 'Philosophy of Religion' component AS-Level 'OCR Religious Studies' specification. Learning Objectives: To explain the key arguments for the existence of God. To evaluate the overall credibility of their arguments.
Christian Attitudes to Homosexuality
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Christian Attitudes to Homosexuality

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This contains a fully resourced lesson on Christian attitudes to homosexuality, focusing in particular on the the differences between those focused on sexual orientation and those on sexual activity. Extension tasks are positioned throughout to push the learning of the more able students. Learning Objectives are as follows: To describe how attitudes towards homosexuality in the UK in the last 50 years have changed. To explain the different Christian attitudes towards homosexuality. To evaluate your own opinion towards the Christian viewpoint. It is designed specifically to support the new AQA Religious Studies Thematic Unit, but can easily be adapted to other specifications or years.
How the Media influences our ideas
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How the Media influences our ideas

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This lesson focuses on the different ways in the mass media influences our values, whether that be in a positive or negative manner. This is designed to take place over two 50-minute lessons.
Scale and Distance
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Scale and Distance

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A fully resourced lesson where students are introduced to the skill of measuring scale. It also includes an idea for a class practical on scale, where they have to measure out and scale the classroom itself!
The Four Noble Truths
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The Four Noble Truths

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A lesson on the Four Noble Truths that aims to take a different direction to other lessons posted on TES. It focuses on whether they adequately explain why there is suffering in the world. Please comment for feedback.
Savanna Ecosystem
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Savanna Ecosystem

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on Savanna ecosystems. The main activities include using a range of sources to bullet point the characteristics of the ecosystem, an information comprehension task to understand how plants and animals have adapted, and a picture analysis task to begin to investigate the different challenges facing the ecosystem. It is aimed primarily at KS3 students: Learning Objectives: To describe the characteristics of a Savanna ecosystem. To explain how animals and plants have adapted to this ecosystem. To investigate the challenges facing this ecosystem.
The Teleological (Design) Argument
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The Teleological (Design) Argument

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the Teleological (Design) Argument for the existence of God.The main part of the lesson involves a class discussion on the elements of design they can think of from the natural world and relate this to the teleological argument in a written exercise, followed by an active class demonstration of Paley’s watch analogy (you could include props such as a pocket watch!) consolidated with a card sort task, then students create their own labelled diagram (text-to-picture) exercise to show the modern reformulations of the teleological argument. An essay question is provided at the end. Learning Objectives: To outline the teleological argument for the existence of God. To explain Paley’s version of the teleological argument. To assess the effectiveness of its modern reformulations.
Plato's Analogy of the Cave
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Plato's Analogy of the Cave

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This contains a fully resourced lesson on Plato's analogy of the cave. It contains a set of activities to meet the following objectives: To describe the story of Plato’s cave. To explain how the story questions our idea of reality. To understand the symbolism of Plato’s ideas in The Matrix. Has worked very well with my classes. It is ideally aimed at KS4, but can easily be adapted for KS3.
How Convincing Is The Theory Of Evolution
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How Convincing Is The Theory Of Evolution

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This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the theory of evolution. In the main part of the lessons students complete a gap-filling exercise in order to understand how the basic theory works, work in pairs to rank different arguments (religious and scientific) on the 'Layers of Inference' grid, and finally complete an extended writing task on how convincing they find the theory based on the evidence and argument provided. Learning Objectives: To describe the theory of evolution. To explain the arguments for and against the theory of evolution. To evaluate how convincing you find the theory.