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I am a teacher specialising in Geography and Religious Studies with over 4 years experience to date. I pride myself on designing lessons that engages students in their learning, with an enquiry-based focus being at the forefront. Any lesson that you download is fully resourced and differentiated ready to use in a flash. I hope they make a real contributing to your own classroom like they have done to mine.

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I am a teacher specialising in Geography and Religious Studies with over 4 years experience to date. I pride myself on designing lessons that engages students in their learning, with an enquiry-based focus being at the forefront. Any lesson that you download is fully resourced and differentiated ready to use in a flash. I hope they make a real contributing to your own classroom like they have done to mine.
OCR AS Philosophy Complete Syllabus

OCR AS Philosophy Complete Syllabus

This contains a set of fully resourced, differentiated lessons to cover the entire OCR AS Philosophy syllabus. Theme 1 - Philosophical Language And Thought It was taught in the following order: What Is Plato’s Analogy Of The Cave? How Valid Is Plato’s Analogy Of The Cave? What Is Plato’s Theory Of The Forms? What Are Aristotle’s Four Causes? What Is Aristotle’s Prime Mover? How Did Plato Distinguish Between The Body And Soul? How Did Aristotle Distinguish Between The Body And Soul? How Did Descartes Distinguish Between The Mind And Soul? Theme 2 - The Existence Of God It was taught in the following order: What Is The Teleological Argument? How Can The Teleological Argument Be Challenged? What Is The Cosmological Argument? What Is The Ontological Argument? Does The Ontological Argument Work? Theme 3 - God And The World It was taught in the following order: What Are Religious Experiences? Do Religious Experiences Prove The Existence of God? How Can The Validity Of Religious Experiences Be Challenged? How Is The Problem Of Evil A Challenge To The Existence Of God? Does The Augustinian Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil? Does The Irenaean Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil?
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Hindu Funerals

Hindu Funerals

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on Hindu funerals. In the starter students have to use two images to draw out initial observations about Hindu funerals. In the main this leads to an information gathering task and a symbolism task, with a GCSE style question included to assess understanding of the material. Plenary is also included. Learning Objectives are: To describe the key features of a Hindu funeral service. To explain how these features reflect their beliefs about life after death.
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What Are Moral Decisions

What Are Moral Decisions

This is a fully resourced, introductory lesson on how people go about making moral decisions. The main part of the lesson mostly focuses on a case study to consider the effects of our moral actions, namely that the minerals from our mobile phones can be sourced (on occasion) to war zones. It contains a written task, peer discussion task and evaluation task. To describe what moral decisions are. To explain the effects of our moral decisions. To evaluate the morality of our moral decisions.
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What Is The Cosmological Argument

What Is The Cosmological Argument

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the cosmological argument. The main part of the lesson involves students working in groups to develop a mini-presentation that can be used to teach the rest of the class one of Aquinas’s 3 ways, then some quick note-taking followed by questions that students answer to consider the strength of Leibniz’s cosmological argument, followed by students producing a factfile on how David Hume criticised the argument, then an information hunt on how other philosophers (such as Bertrand Russell an Richard Dawkins) criticised the argument (within this task students have to mark on their dartboard how strong they believe that criticism is). Learning Objectives: To outline the Cosmological Argument as a case for the existence of God. To explain Leibniz’s contribution to the argument. To assess the validity of its philosophical criticisms. (The starter activity is based upon an advert for Guinness which can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sn8vcaLfMsE)
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How Can The Teleological Argument Be Challenged

How Can The Teleological Argument Be Challenged

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on how the teleological argument can be challenged, namely on three grounds: moral (John Stuart Mill), logic (David Hume), and scientific (Charles Darwin). The main part of the lesson involves students working in groups to produce a teaching tool based on their allocated challenge (use poster paper, ensure they also make their own copy), from which they then teach the other groups about their challenge. This leads into a written task where students write a model conclusion to an essay question on the challenges facing the teleological argument. Learning Objectives: To explain why David Hume, Charles Darwin and John Mill rejected the teleological argument. To assess the effectiveness of their objections. To evaluate the overall strength of the teleological argument for the existence of God.
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How Did Descartes Distinguish Between The Mind And Body

How Did Descartes Distinguish Between The Mind And Body

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on how Descartes philosophical distinction between the mind (soul) and body. The main part of the lesson involves students using an information sheet to complete a table summarising the key properties of the mind (soul) and body for Descartes, as well as grading the effectiveness of Descartes responses to the initial philosophical rejections of his theory, after which they produce a fact file on Gilbert Ryle’s criticism of Descartes viewpoint. They then, as a final activity, complete a grid showing how different philosophers would respond to an essay title with evidence/arguments they might use to support. Learning Objectives: To outline Descartes theory of mind-body dualism. To assess Gilbert Ryle’s criticism of Descartes. To evaluate the overall philosophical positions on the immortality of the soul.
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OCR AS Philosophy - Philosophical Language And Thought (Theme 1)

OCR AS Philosophy - Philosophical Language And Thought (Theme 1)

This contains a set of fully resourced, differentiated lessons on the nature of reality (Plato vs Aristotle) and the philosophical distinctions between the body and soul (Plato, Descartes, Aristotle, Dawkins, Ryle) to cover the OCR AS Philosophy specification for Theme 1 - Philosophical Language And Thought. It was taught in the following order: What Is Plato’s Analogy Of The Cave? How Valid Is Plato’s Analogy Of The Cave? What Is Plato’s Theory Of The Forms? What Are Aristotle’s Four Causes? What Is Aristotle’s Prime Mover? How Did Plato Distinguish Between The Body And Soul? How Did Aristotle Distinguish Between The Body And Soul? How Did Descartes Distinguish Between The Mind And Soul?
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What Is The Ontological Argument?

What Is The Ontological Argument?

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the ontological argument. The main part of the lesson involves an active class demonstration of Anselm’s first version of the ontological argument (supported with a card sort task), with students then drawing a perfect island to draw out how Gaunilo criticsed this version, with students finally annotating Anselm’s second version of his ontological argument. Learning Objectives: To outline Anselm’s Ontological Argument for the existence of God. To explain Gaunilo’s criticism to it. To assess the strength of Anselm’s reply. (Note: You will require chocolate or other food item for the starter activity)
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Does The Ontological Argument Work?

Does The Ontological Argument Work?

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on Descartes version of the ontological argument and its overall success. The main part of the lesson involves students using two colours to add addotations to a copy of Descartes ontological argument to show how it works and its strengths/weaknesses, followed by a comprehension exercise where students answer a series of questions on how Kant criticised the argument, which is concluded with students writing a model conclusion to an essay question relating to the success of the ontological argument. Learning Objectives: To outline Descartes version of the Ontological argument. To explain why Kant rejected the Ontological argument. To evaluate how successful the argument is in proving the existence of God.
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OCR AS Philosophy - The Existence Of God (Theme 2)

OCR AS Philosophy - The Existence Of God (Theme 2)

This contains a set of fully resourced, differentiated lessons on arguments for the existence of God to cover the OCR AS Philosophy specification for Theme 2 - The Existence Of God. It was taught in the following order: What Is The Teleological Argument? How Can The Teleological Argument Be Challenged? What Is The Cosmological Argument? What Is The Ontological Argument? Does The Ontological Argument Work?
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OCR AS Philosophy Complete Syllabus

OCR AS Philosophy Complete Syllabus

This contains a set of fully resourced, differentiated lessons to cover the entire OCR AS Philosophy syllabus. Theme 1 - Philosophical Language And Thought It was taught in the following order: What Is Plato’s Analogy Of The Cave? How Valid Is Plato’s Analogy Of The Cave? What Is Plato’s Theory Of The Forms? What Are Aristotle’s Four Causes? What Is Aristotle’s Prime Mover? How Did Plato Distinguish Between The Body And Soul? How Did Aristotle Distinguish Between The Body And Soul? How Did Descartes Distinguish Between The Mind And Soul? Theme 2 - The Existence Of God It was taught in the following order: What Is The Teleological Argument? How Can The Teleological Argument Be Challenged? What Is The Cosmological Argument? What Is The Ontological Argument? Does The Ontological Argument Work? Theme 3 - God And The World It was taught in the following order: What Are Religious Experiences? Do Religious Experiences Prove The Existence of God? How Can The Validity Of Religious Experiences Be Challenged? How Is The Problem Of Evil A Challenge To The Existence Of God? Does The Augustinian Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil? Does The Irenaean Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil?
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Do Religious Experiences Prove The Existence Of God?

Do Religious Experiences Prove The Existence Of God?

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the arguments for and against religious experiences proving the existence of God. The main part of the lesson involves some note-taking, class discussion and written tasks to explain scholarly views for and against religious experiences, followed by an extended written reflection considering whether they believe religious experiences prove the existence of God (with focus on what makes these scholarly arguments strong or weak).
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How Did Aristotle Distinguish Between The Body And Soul

How Did Aristotle Distinguish Between The Body And Soul

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on Aristotle’s philosophical distinction between the body and soul. The main part of the lesson involves students having to make an educated guess on his viewpoint through an introductory quote, followed by students creating their own diagram to show Aristotle’s philosophical viewpoint, then they complete a Venn diagram comparing this view with that of Plato, before finally creating a mind map on the reasons why Richard Dawkins rejects any notion of an immortal soul. Learning Objectives: To outline Aristotle’s distinction between the body and soul. To compare the similarities and differences with Plato’s view of the soul. To assess the philosophical opinions for the rejection of the existence of a soul.
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OCR AS Philosophy - God And The World (Theme 3)

OCR AS Philosophy - God And The World (Theme 3)

This contains a set of fully resourced, differentiated lessons on religious experiences and the problem of evil to cover the OCR AS Philosophy specification for Theme 3 - God And The World. It was taught in the following order: What Are Religious Experiences? Do Religious Experiences Prove The Existence of God? How Can The Validity Of Religious Experiences Be Challenged? How Is The Problem Of Evil A Challenge To The Existence Of God? Does The Augustinian Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil? Does The Irenaean Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil?
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How Can The Validity Of Religious Experiences Be Challenged

How Can The Validity Of Religious Experiences Be Challenged

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on how the different grounds under which religious experiences can be challenged, including psychological, physiological explanations, interpretation difficulties and the inability for humans to experience a divine reality. The main part of the lesson involves students summarising the challenge they have been allocated on the sheet, then peer teaching to others in their group. This leads onto producing a bullet-pointed essay plan on the topic. Learning Objectives: To explain the various challenges to the validity of religious experiences. To assess the strength of these challenges. To evaluate whether the notion of religious experiences is valid.
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How Is The Problem Of Evil A Challenge To The Existence Of God

How Is The Problem Of Evil A Challenge To The Existence Of God

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on how the problem of evil can be seen by some to challenge the existence of God. The main part of the lesson involves a brief section of note-taking and class discussion on the basic idea behind the problem of evil, with students suggesting their own solutions to the inconsistent triad (logical problem), followed by a written comprehension exercise on the evidential problem. The lesson concludes with a brainstorming exercise on the strengths and weaknesses of Swinburne’s Free Will Defence and class continuum on its success in resolving the problem of evil. Learning Objectives: To explain the logical and evidential problem as a challenge to the existence of God. To assess one philosophical response to the problem. To evaluate the success of this response.
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Does The Irenaean Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil

Does The Irenaean Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the Irenaean theodicy. The main part of the lesson involves using an information sheet to answer a set of questions on its key features, including a comparison to the Augustinian theodicy as an extension task, followed by class note-taking and brief discussion tasks on John Hick’s extension of the theodicy, followed by a ranking task on the strengths of the theodicy and brainstorming activity on its weaknesses before finally reflecting on their viewpoint towards the overall success of the theodicy. Learning Objectives: To explain the key features of the Irenaean theodicy. To assess its relative strengths and weaknesses. To evaluate its success in responding to the problem of evil.
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Does The Augustinian Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil

Does The Augustinian Theodicy Solve The Problem Of Evil

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the Augustianian theodicy. The main part of the lesson involves an information hunt answering key questions on the Augustinian theodicy, a ranking task on the strengths of the theodicy, then a sorting task of the weaknesses of the theodicy into different categories (moral/scientific/logical), before producing a bullet-pointed essay plan on the overall success of the theodicy.
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How Can The Impacts Of Earthquakes Be Mitigated

How Can The Impacts Of Earthquakes Be Mitigated

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on how the impacts of earthquakes can be mitigated. Focused on the 3Ps, the main part of the lesson involves a discussion task on the difference between the three approaches and the techniques it might involve, leading up to an extended note taking task on how the different techniques can help to mitigate the impacts of an earthquake. Learning Objectives: To describe the different approaches to mitigating the impacts of earthquakes. To explain how these approaches work in practice. To evaluate the effectiveness of these approaches.
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How Is A Newborn Welcomed In Islam?

How Is A Newborn Welcomed In Islam?

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on how babies are welcomed into the Islamic faith, otherwise known as the Aqiqah Ceremony. The main part of the lesson contains an information hunt on the different practices followed by pair-work where students have to compare the similarities and differences with Christian Baptism. Learning Objectives: To describe how Muslims welcome newborns into the Islam. To explain why these practices are important to Muslims. To compare this ceremony with the Christian tradition.
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Contour Island Practical Lesson

Contour Island Practical Lesson

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on contours. This lesson, well situated after a lesson on the basics of contours, involves students creating their own 3D cardboard models to show how contours can show the height and shape of the land. It contains a full set of step-by-step instructions and supporting visuals to assist students with this. Learning Objectives: To identify how contours can be represented through 3D modelling. To describe the relief of your models using appropriate geographical terminology.
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What Are Ultimate Questions

What Are Ultimate Questions

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson which acts as an introduction to the idea of 'Ultimate Questions'. The main part of the lesson involves students working in pairs to generate their own examples of ultimate questions (using stimuli to help), a class viewpoint sharing task (which could be done as a silent conversation), and a written reflection task at the end where they evaluate various viewpoints towards one ultimate question. Learning Objectives are as follows: To describe examples of ‘ultimate questions’. To explain different viewpoints towards some of these questions. To express a reasoned and balanced viewpoint to one of these questions.
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How Is The Christian Creation Story Best Understood

How Is The Christian Creation Story Best Understood

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the Christian Creation Story from Genesis. The main part of the lesson involves drawing a storyboard to show the key parts of the story, a pair discussion task on how Fundamentalist and Liberal Christians might view the story (leading to a card sorting task of the reasons behind the views), and finally a written reflection evaluating how they believe the story is best understood. Learning Objectives: To describe the Christian Creation Story. To explain how this story is viewed by different Christians. To evaluate how you personally believe it is best understood.
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How Convincing Is The Big Bang Theory

How Convincing Is The Big Bang Theory

This contains a fully resourced, differentiated lesson on the Big Bang theory. The main part of the lesson involves students annotating a set of images, in the appropriate spaces, to describe how the theory works. It also involves an information gathering exercise on the arguments (religious and scientific) for and against the Big Bang theory, and an evaluation task where students give a score according to how convincing they find the theory based on the evidence and arguments presented. Learning Objectives: To describe the Big Bang theory. To explain the arguments for and against the Big Bang theory. To evaluate how convincing you find the theory.
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