1. Resources Home
  2. Early Years
  3. Computing
  4. Computer science
STEM Careers

STEM Careers

A set of over 60 STEM Careers cards to help pupils develop an understanding of the range of possible STEM careers available.
paultyler
Crash Course Computer Science Bundle Episodes 1-5 Questions & Answer Key

Crash Course Computer Science Bundle Episodes 1-5 Questions & Answer Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Crash Course Computer Science! In this series, we're going to trace the origins of our modern computers, take a closer look at the ideas that gave us our current hardware and software, discuss how and why our smart devices just keep getting smarter, and even look towards the future! Computers fill a crucial role in the function of our society, and it's our hope that over the course of this series you will gain a better understanding of how far computers have taken us and how far they may carry us into the future. (Crash Course Synopsis) 1 Early Computing 2 Electronic Computing 3 Boolean Logic & Logic Gates 4 Representing Numbers & Letters with Binary 5 How Computers Calculate - the ALU Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class &; Flipped Classroom Assignment Video Link Included
Videonotesandmore
Crash Course Computer Science #5 How Computers Calculate - the ALU Qs & A

Crash Course Computer Science #5 How Computers Calculate - the ALU Qs & A

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Take the 2017 PBS Digital Studios Survey: http://surveymonkey.com/r/pbsds2017. Today we're going to talk about a fundamental part of all modern computers. The thing that basically everything else uses - the Arithmetic and Logic Unit (or the ALU). The ALU may not have to most exciting name, but it is the mathematical brain of a computer and is responsible for all the calculations your computer does! And it's actually not that complicated. So today we're going to use the binary and logic gates we learned in previous episodes to build one from scratch, and then we'll use our newly minted ALU when we construct the heart of a computer, the CPU, in episode 7. (Crash Course Synopsis: 11:09) *CORRECTION* We got our wires crossed with the Intel 4004, which we discuss later. The 74181 was introduced by Texas Instruments in 1970 but appeared in technical manuals around 1969. The design of the 74181, like most of the 74xx/74xxx series, was an open design which was manufactured by many other companies - Fairchild was one such manufacturer. They produced a chip, the Fairchild 9341, which was pin-for-pin compatible with the 74181. Fairchild was the first to prototype an ALU, building the Fairchild 4711 in 1968 - a one-off device not optimized for scale manufacturing. In 1969, Signetics came out with the 8260, which they marketed in a very limited sense (it was attached, AFAICT, to one particular computer, the Data General SUPERNOVA). TI follows afterwards (March 1970) with the 74181, coupled with the 9341 from Fairchild. The 74181 became the standard number for this part, and was available from many manufacturers (back in those days, chip makers cross-licensed designs all over the place in order to provide assurance that their part could be sourced from multiple manufacturers). Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class &; Flipped Classroom Assignment Video Link Included
Videonotesandmore
Crash Course Computer Science #4 Representing Numbers & Letters with Binary Q&A

Crash Course Computer Science #4 Representing Numbers & Letters with Binary Q&A

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Today, we’re going to take a look at how computers use a stream of 1s and 0s to represent all of our data - from our text messages and photos to music and web-pages. We’re going to focus on how these binary values are used to represent numbers and letters, and discuss how our need to perform operations on larger and more complex values brought us from our 8-bit video games to beautiful Instagram photos, and from unreadable garbled text in our emails to a universal language encoding scheme. (Crash Course Synopsis: 10:45) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment Video Link Included
Videonotesandmore
Minecraft Pi Programming

Minecraft Pi Programming

A mixture of tasks and content linked to programming using raspberry PI, Python and Minecraft. I found this unit to be really useful and students got a lot out of it.
NextStepComputing
Scratch Lesson

Scratch Lesson

Full lesson that was used for a Job interview. Fully resourced and lesson plan attached to support. The lesson is an introduction to Scratch that can be taught to year 7 students.
NextStepComputing
Crash Course Computer Science #39 Educational Technology Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #39 Educational Technology Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Today we’re going to go a little meta and talk about how computer science can support learning with educational technology. We here at Crash Course are big fans of interactive in-class learning and hands-on experiences, but we also believe in the additive power of educational technology inside and outside the classroom from the Internet itself and Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs to AI driven intelligent tutoring systems and virtual reality. (Crash Course Synopsis: 11:51) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment Video Link Included
Videonotesandmore
Crash Course Computer Science #38 Psychology of Computing Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #38 Psychology of Computing Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin We’ve spent most of this series talking about computers. Which makes sense - this is Crash Course COMPUTER SCIENCE after all. But at their core computers are tools employed by humans and humans are pretty complicated. So today, we’re going to discuss some psychological considerations in building computers like how to make them easier for humans to use, the uncanny valley problem when humanoid robots gets more and more humanlike, and strategies to make our devices work better with us by incorporating our emotions and even altering our gaze. Oh, and we'll talk about Carrie Anne's all time favorite user interface design principle - knurling. (Crash course Synopsis 12:38) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
Videonotesandmore
Crash Course Computer Science #37 Robots Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #37 Robots Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Today we're going to talk about robots! Robots are often thought as a technology of the future, but they're already here by the millions in the workplace, our homes, and pretty soon on the roads. We'll discuss the origins of robotics to its proliferation, and even look at some common control designs that were implemented to make them more useful in the workplace. Robots are often thought of as a menace or danger to society, and although there definitely is the propensity for malicious uses, robots also have the potential to drastically improve the world. (Crash course Synopsis 12:25) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
Videonotesandmore
Crash Course Computer Science #36 Natural Language Processing Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #36 Natural Language Processing Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Today we’re going to talk about how computers understand speech and speak themselves. As computers play an increasing role in our daily lives there has been an growing demand for voice user interfaces, but speech is also terribly complicated. Vocabularies are diverse, sentence structures can often dictate the meaning of certain words, and computers also have to deal with accents, mispronunciations, and many common linguistic faux pas. The field of Natural Language Processing, or NLP, attempts to solve these problems, with a number of techniques we’ll discuss today. And even though our virtual assistants like Siri, Alexa, Google Home, Bixby, and Cortana have come a long way from the first speech processing and synthesis models, there is still much room for improvement. (Crash course Synopsis 11:49) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
Videonotesandmore
Crash Course Computer Science #31 Cybersecurity Q & A-Key

Crash Course Computer Science #31 Cybersecurity Q & A-Key

Host Carrie Anne Philbin Cybersecurity is a set of techniques to protect the secrecy, integrity, and availability of computer systems and data against threats. In today’s episode, we’re going to unpack these three goals and talk through some strategies we use like passwords, biometrics, and access privileges to keep our information as secure, but also as accessible as possible. From massive Denial of Service, or DDos attacks, to malware and brute force password cracking there are a lot of ways for hackers to gain access to your data, so we’ll also discuss some strategies like creating strong passwords, and using 2-factor authentication, to keep your information safe. (Crash course Synopsis 12:29) Fill in the blank questions with answer key In-Class & Flipped Classroom Assignment
Videonotesandmore