1. Resources Home
  2. Whole School
  3. Special educational needs
  4. Specific learning difficulty
  5. Dyslexia
Discriptive writing activity based on Treasure Island

Discriptive writing activity based on Treasure Island

Following of from writing about the description of The Captain at the opening of Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island this activity gets students to write their own description of a pirate encouraging the use of adjectives, similes, metaphors, and speech, with speech marks. There is then a guided self and peer assessment activities followed by redrafting and final write up. I used this over a sequence of 3 lessons but mainstream learners would progress more quickly. Following on from my free resource The Captain.
twewilletts
Jumbled sentences

Jumbled sentences

I used this resource with two children with dyslexia. There is clues in the jumbled sentences to help them put the sentences together properly
sarahwhitneystead
Audio Story: The Monkey and the Crocodile plus read along text

Audio Story: The Monkey and the Crocodile plus read along text

An Indian Animal Fable for KS1 & KS2 - great for whole class listening, or small groups supported reading/ listening groups. Perfect for encouraging a love of story in reluctant readers. The Monkey and the Crocodile is a classic trickster gets tricked tale, originally from the ancient Indian text - the Panchatantra - but updated and retold, keeping all the wisdom but adding modern fun. Suitable for KS1 and KS2 classes, perfect for quiet time, listening, independently or as a whole class. Brilliant for encouraging a love of stories, especially for those who struggle to read. This is a free resource, to give you a taste of Tale Time's new audio resources and teaching aids. If you liked this, please do check out our other stories and resource packs. We'd love to hear what you thought, how you used the story and if you feel we can improve, or offer any other resources. Please do leave comments. Tale Time - Nurturing a love of stories: www.taletime.co.uk
TaleTimeStories
Reading Comprehension Strategies Corner Bookmarks

Reading Comprehension Strategies Corner Bookmarks

Reading comprehension corner bookmarks help students use questions and strategies to make meaningful connections to any book. They are easy to make and fun to use. Each bookmark has a writing prompt that requires students to actively use the text. They illicit higher level thinking skills and improve comprehension. Students can write on the back and mark the place in the book for later reference and sharing. These are great for literacy centers, book circles, book clubs, and anytime. These bookmarks encourage students to make personal connections with the text, visualize, predict, infer, and summarize information. They make a great activity to send home. Use the blank template to create labels and organize reading assignments. What’s included ➠30 different corner bookmark templates in black and white. Each template has a different strategy or writing prompt and visual directions for assembly. ➠1 blank template to create individualized bookmarks. ➠5 book report templates to use as extension activities. ➠Easy to follow visual directions on each page. ➠Teaching tips and activity ideas. ➠List of writing prompts/questions for planning.
Tammys-Toolbox
Spring Cloze.

Spring Cloze.

14 cloze procedures with word banks of 6 or 8 words each. These words can be found/highlighted in sentences under three boxes for pupils to depict what they read with the same words to be filled in letter by letter underneath a main picture to color in.
butterbeans65
A parent's guide to reading and writing -  early years, primary and secondary.

A parent's guide to reading and writing - early years, primary and secondary.

This is a PDF of my book 'Teach your digital native to read and write: A guide for parents'. It is also available in paperback and for Kindle from Amazon. Young people today are known as ‘digital natives’. Constant exposure to digital devices is even changing the way that they think, learn and relate to others. Digital technologies mean we do, in fact, engage with the written word more than ever before, yet reading and writing can lack relevance in young people's lives. Many parents want to support their child with learning to read and write but are unsure where to start. Which literacy skills are needed in our digital age? How can you tempt young people away from their digital devices to learn these? How do you ensure digital devices are helping rather than hindering learning? All of these questions and more are answered in 'Teach your Digital Native to Read and Write', an essential guide for any parent or carer wanting to know how to support their ‘digital native’ to read and write in the 21st century. • Are e-books as useful as paper books? • How can I support my child with the phonics being taught in school? • Are handwriting and spelling still necessary skills in the era of digital devices and predictive texting? • How can I support my older child who is finding literacy difficult or a dyslexic child? • How can I support my child with reading and writing tasks? • And is it even possible to make reading as engaging for my child as computer games and mobile phones? This is a must-have book for any parent wanting to support their 21st century child to develop effective literacy skills needed to succeed academically, personally, socially and in employment. Overview of contents: Chapter One: Digital Natives Chapter Two: What is literacy? Chapter Three: Pre-reading skills Chapter Four: Phonics Chapter Five: After Phonics - Becoming a Skilled Reader Chapter Six: Handwriting Chapter Seven: Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar Chapter Eight: Writing - the Bigger Picture Chapter Nine: Supporting your Older Child or Teenager Chapter Ten: Digital Literacy The author, Victoria Honeybourne, has a background in education and is a senior advisory teacher with a local authority. She has spoken at national events and has written several other education books
CrookedSteeple