Japanese  (Hiragana) Alphabet Bingo

Japanese (Hiragana) Alphabet Bingo

With this Alphabet Bingo game cards, your students will benefit by hearing and seeing the letters in a fun way. There are enough cards for 36 students. Although the bingo cards can stock and them laminated so they last for years. In addition to the 36 cards, there are instructions for playing alphabet bingo with suggestions for variations
lonniedaizovi
114 Japanese Writing Worksheets For Writing Practice + 31 Fun Teaching Activities For These Cards

114 Japanese Writing Worksheets For Writing Practice + 31 Fun Teaching Activities For These Cards

Welcome to the 'Let’s Write in Japanese!' pack. There are lots of ways of using this teaching pack. It could be used as writing assessment for students learning Japanese. The students could write about a topic in Japanese before starting a unit, and then write again about the topic, using the second worksheet at the end of the topic to see how much they have progressed. This pack contains a 31 Teaching Activity Teacher Guide using these photo flash cards. These activities are quick and fun to do and will improve both your students' memory and vocabulary skills. It could also be used as an introduction to guided writing. Students can write sentences as a class and share the sentences together and they can then write them on their own. Alternatively, students could work in pairs - one student dictates to the other what to write down about what they see in the picture. These pages could also be used to write different stories, using the pictures as a stimulus. ***** Please note - these resources provide visual prompts and support to the students, not direct language instruction **************
peterfogarty
Whizzy loop

Whizzy loop

Use this whizzy loop by pressing the 's' key on your keyboard to start and stop it spinning super fast. You can change the text on the slides quite easily to suit your purposes - there is one here with numbers, one with dates and one with sentences on and several other ideas - at its simplest you can just ask pupils to translate the slide it stops on but you can use it in many, many different ways - put pupil names on it as a name selector, or sentences starters and a connective to build sentences - you choose. I have put several examples on here to help with ideas, but the concept of randomising things is the same throughout. Enjoy! The pupils LOVE coming to press the 's' key.....the simplest of things seem to please them.
s.barfoot
Japanese Festivals and Culture

Japanese Festivals and Culture

A cross curriculum resource for Japanese and Social Studies/ Humanities. This assignment includes library (research skills) and discussion with your librarian is recommended and a library lesson (or several) booked. There are several elective topics within the Festivals and Cultural activities to choose from and students can also pick their own useful phrases to include. Teacher notes and an Assessment/marking sheet are included.
Balance4Life
Passport to Japan & its Culture

Passport to Japan & its Culture

Ideally suited to students from Yr 3 upwards, this Multiple Intelligences assignment requires students to complete 8 of 16 tasks over a 10 week term. Teachers will need to download the assignment and print double sided, then fold in half. Select coloured card/heavier paper for the students to create their "passport" - extending them by using kana. Staple in the centre. As each task is completed, a sticker is placed on that page. Suitable Japanese icons/pictures are readily available on the web if the accompanying worksheet of stickers doesn't suit. Some students will seek to do more than the 8 tasks and I would suggest that this be counted as extension work. A marking sheet is also included.
Balance4Life
Basic Expressions Bingo in Many Languages

Basic Expressions Bingo in Many Languages

Basic Expression Bingo in Many Languages - This bingo game is a "must have"; for all ages and all languages. The 32 pictures are of very common and necessary expressions that all language learners need to know. There are 36 cards for those lucky teachers who have many student in their classes (Me) or for the eager students who want to increase their chances of winning by playing with more than one card. Larger calling cards are provided and it is suggested that the teacher paste the phrases on the back (provided in English, Spanish, French, Italian, German, Arabic, Chinese and Japanese) . Of course teachers of ANY language, less commonly taught languages or simply not a language listed above, can use this game and simply use their language of choice. The phrases pictured are: - Good morning - Good afternoon - Good evening - Bless you! - What;s your name? - My name is... - Hello - Good bye - Please - Thank you - Be careful - I like - I don't know - I know - I'm sorry - excuse me, pardon me - I'm sleepy - I'm afraid - I'm thirsty - I'm hungry - I'm embarrassed - I don't understand - How much does this cost? - What's the weather like? - I'm ...years old - How old are you? - It's the ...of... - What's the date today? - What time is it? - It's ...o'clock - Pleased to meet you. - Let me introduce you to...
lonniedaizovi
Japanese Classroom Expression Pics for Walls or Boards

Japanese Classroom Expression Pics for Walls or Boards

Japanese Classroom Expression Pics (coloured) for Walls or Boards help students speak Japanese in class. This packet includes 16 big coloured pictures of necessary expressions (and the written Japanese expressions associated with them) said by the teacher or student on an everyday basis. The coloured pictures represent our multi-cultural classrooms. Hang them on the wall with the words (I put a colorful construction paper as a background behind each drawing with the sentence or question under it.) or on the bulletin boards. The expressions ( but in Japanese) are: May I borrow a pencil? May I sharpen my pencil? What page are we on? May I go to the nurse’s office? Please write it on the board. May I get a drink of water? Listen please. May I go to the office? I’m sorry. I didn’t do the homework. Please take out a piece of paper. May I throw this away? Please open your books. I don’t understand. Silence please. May I go to the bathroom? May I go to my locker? If you'd prefer other phrases, words,or alphabets, use them! The pictures work your words or mine.
lonniedaizovi
114 Japanese Bingo Game Cards

114 Japanese Bingo Game Cards

Welcome to the Japanese Bingo pack. This is a simple starter game for students. There are 114 different pictures to choose from. Select a single picture and project the image on the wall or share it with the class as a handout. Talk about the picture and then ask your students to select and write down 5 items from the picture. Then look at the picture and pick out all the key vocabulary you want them to talk about. The first student to have all their items read out is the winner. With 57 different settings and 114 different game cards, there are plenty chances for great vocabulary. ***** Please note - these resources provide visual prompts and support to the students, not direct language instruction **************
peterfogarty
Speak, Write and Play In Japanese - The Fun Way Of Learning!

Speak, Write and Play In Japanese - The Fun Way Of Learning!

Are you learning Japanese? Are you looking for a fun way to learn Japanese? I have developed a way to learn different languages based on my experience as an ESL teacher. This pack has 57 different settings for students to talk about in Japanese. The worksheets themselves are in English and the students do need to translate the places and objects they see into Japanese. At the end of the session, the students can play a fun game of word bingo to show they have mastered that day's vocabulary. Try it, it is a lot of fun for everyone! Japanese Bingo pack: This is a simple starter game for students. There are 114 different pictures to choose from. Select a single picture and project the image on the wall or share it with the class as a handout. Let's Talk in Japanese!: This set of cards looks at 57 different settings. The teacher describes something in the top card. The students then use this to model a sentence using the bottom set of pictures. There are lots of things to see and describe in every picture. When the students have completed this task, they can repeat it by working in pairs to discuss each picture. Let's Write in Japanese pack: There are lots of ways of using this teaching pack. It could be used as writing assessment for students learning Japanese. * Please note - these resources provide visual prompts, not specific language instruction.
peterfogarty
57 Japanese Setting Cards For Conversation Practice

57 Japanese Setting Cards For Conversation Practice

Welcome to the Let’s Talk in Japanese! pack. This set of cards looks at 57 different settings. The teacher describes something in the top card. The students then use this to model a sentence using the bottom set of pictures. There are lots of things to see and describe in every picture. When the students have completed this task, they can repeat it by working in pairs to discuss each picture. What works very well is for the two pictures to be directly projected on a wall. The teacher talks about the top picture, such as 'In my picture, I can see two seagulls flying.'... then the students model their responses, using the sentence structure provided by the teacher. There are lots of different ways you could use this pack. You could laminate them into two cards and get each student to talk about what they had seen in their picture. ***** Please note - these resources provide visual prompts and support to the students, not direct language instruction **************
peterfogarty