Whole-school logical reasoning resources

Keeping your class engaged with new and interesting classroom resources is vital in helping them reach their potential. With Tes Resources you’ll never be short of teaching ideas. We have a range of tried and tested materials created by teachers for teachers, from early years through to A level.

Breathe new life into your lesson plans with our primary and secondary classroom resources. Whether you’re looking for fun maths worksheets or brand new guided reading activities, we have thousands of free and premium resources for you to download. From early years to primary, you’ll find phonics worksheets and numeracy games and all you need to revise for Sats. From secondary to post-16, we have everything from French lessons to algebra activities, as well as GCSE revision guides and more.

Creating more GUI interfaces using TKinter (Python Challenges)

Creating more GUI interfaces using TKinter (Python Challenges)

A useful single document to help improve pupils (and teachers) knowledge of creating a GUI (Graphical User Interface) using the TKinter library in Python. This is the second document about GUI interfaces using TKinter and it is strongly recommended that the pupils are familiar with the first document before attempting to tackle the challenges in this document. SUITABLE FOR A STUDENT’S NON-EXAM ASSESSMENT (NEA) RESOURCE BANK. This handout helps pupils and teacher brush up on thier Python skills and works well as a handy reference guide. This document includes an explanation of using functions in Python and gives examples of code with easy to follow explanations. It also includes a single page of 4 challenges for students to complete which is ideal for photocopying and distributing to students to work through and practice their new skills. There is even a suggested answer to each of the challenges in case you get stuck. The challenges in this document do assume your pupils have confidence with using Python's programming structure before they tackle this section. Your pupils should have a sound knowledge of using that basics of GUI interfaces using TKinter, tuples and lists along with saving to and reading from a text file and using functions. For more lessons and complete units of work visit www.nicholawilkin.com.

By nwilkin

How do you teach coding?

How do you teach coding?

How do you teach coding? Who is this for? For primary teachers who teach programming - for both non-specialist and specialist computing teachers. What is it? This is a 15-minute research questionnaire by researchers at Queen Mary University of London. Why might you do this? Just doing the questionnaire, will help you think about your own planning and how you teach coding. If you are interested in taking part in the research to improve how we teach programming, pop your email at the end of the survey. Please help us find out more about how we teach programming so we can improve what how we teach our primary pupils how to code! Here is the research questionnaire. https://goo.gl/forms/4nWlR1kQ2r8mnFud2

By jlisaw8

OCR GCSE Computer Science NEA Example (Python and Documentation)

OCR GCSE Computer Science NEA Example (Python and Documentation)

I have produced a complete working solution for the OCR sample NEA Mr. Leeman task. This has been placed in a text file and will just need to be copied to Python. There is also part of a write up for the task (showing students how this task could be completed and what to include during the write-up process). There is a full write-up for task 1 and 2 of the task.

By jamie250

Algorithms  to Code Python Projects -  Computer Science

Algorithms to Code Python Projects - Computer Science

Learning what an Algorithm is and how to take Algorithms and convert them into Computing Code using the Python Programming Language. Resources pack covers 8 lessons including all the teaching materials, work sheets, presentations, home works and python codes for students (python solutions for teachers) listed below: Never lose at Noughts and Crosses / Tic Tac Toe Exploring Fibonacci The Bubble Sort Algorithm Cryptography - Understanding the Caesar Cipher File Operations and Random Quiz Projects An end of unit assessment is also included and a unit marksheet

By HeatonMoorDigital

GCSE Computer Science 9-1: Think - Make the Link (Unit 2 Exam and Unit 3 NEA)

GCSE Computer Science 9-1: Think - Make the Link (Unit 2 Exam and Unit 3 NEA)

OCR GCSE Computer Science Think - Make the Link A presentation developed from the OCR Specification to demonstrate to students how the knowledge and understanding for the new Unit 2 exam correlates with the skills required for the Unit 3 Non-Exam Assessment. By drawing the parallels between the content for the two assessments, I hope to develop stronger students with greater clarity in computational thinking as they approach the NEA in the Autumn term 2017, and prepare for the exam in Summer 2018. Scheme of work and lesson plans currently under development, and will follow.

By Pipjen77

Algorithms in Scratch

Algorithms in Scratch

A great scheme of work to introduce KS2 and KS3 students to coding, learning fundamentals of computer programming. Exercises, keyterms, examplars, guidance notes, assessments, student self evaluation and medium term plan supplied. This scheme of work is based on the new national curriculum for computer science.

By chris_vidal

Beginning Scratch - A Simple Game - Resource Pack

Beginning Scratch - A Simple Game - Resource Pack

Teacher Resources including links to all 7 videos with over 35 minutes of instruction. Each video addresses common mistakes and ensures students think about how to implement each piece of code and apply it to their own work. Completion of the tutorials will enable students to create their own simple games that can be evaluated against the worksheet. - 7 Instruction Videos - 2 Working Example Games (Task and Extension) - 2 Wordsearches - 3 Code Helpsheets - 1 Quiz (15 marks) - 1 Evaluation Scheme

By hackdragn

More Advanced Challenges Python Bundle

More Advanced Challenges Python Bundle

A bundle of more advanced challenges (SUITABLE FOR A STUDENT’S NON-EXAM ASSESSMENT (NEA) RESOURCE BANK) which allow pupils to practice the following skills in Python: - tuples, - lists, - dictionaries - 2D arrays, - 2D lists, - 2D directories, -writing to and reading from an external text file - writing to and reading from an external .csv file - Using functions - Creating a GUI using the TKinter library An explanation and sample code included along with one possible answer for each challenge. These challenges do assume pupils are familiar with the basic skills such as input, output, If statements, using loops, strings and mathematical operators and using the random library. For challenges which cover these basics skills look at our other bundle (https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/basic-challenges-python-bundle-11654010) For more lessons and complete units of work visit www.nicholawilkin.com.

By nwilkin

Basic Challenges Python Bundle

Basic Challenges Python Bundle

A bundle of basic challenges (SUITABLE FOR KS3 AND STUDENT’S NON-EXAM ASSESSMENT (NEA) RESOURCE BANK FOR GCSE PUPILS) which allow pupils to practice the following basic skills in Python : - basics including input and print, strings, integers and arithmetic operators, - basic maths operators, - if..else and if...elif..else, - for loops, - while loops, - random, - using a turtle in Python. One possible answer for each challenge included. For more lessons and complete units of work visit www.nicholawilkin.com.

By nwilkin

Huffman Coding - What's the Magic Word?

Huffman Coding - What's the Magic Word?

I created this resource as a Homework activity to consolidate the learning of Huffman Coding for year 10 Students. Teachers - The magic word is 'ABRACADABRA', however students need to show all their working out in order to score full marks. Marks are awarded for showing the following: Place each character in the correct place at the start of the Huffman tree (1 mark). Correct position of each node on the Huffman tree (5 marks). Correct binary allocation (1 mark). Correct allocation of each character to a binary number (5 marks). Work out the magic word (3 marks) Max 15 marks

By RobbotResources

From Scratch to Python - Introduction into high level computer programming. Lesson2

From Scratch to Python - Introduction into high level computer programming. Lesson2

A sound understanding of computing concepts will help students to see how to get the best from systems they use and how to solve problems when things go wrong. This series of lessons will empower students with fundamental computer coding skills to become potential creators of technology, and not limited to users. In addition, they will prepare potential computer science students who would like to study the subject at GCSE level with secure knowledge and computational thinking ability in key stage 2 and 3. This is the introductory lesson, structured in a flexible format to accommodate students with different abilities. It is advisable for students to be taught algorithms in scratch series before moving on to python. There adequate opportunity for students to practise and apply their skills whilst demonstrating/ documenting knowledge and understanding in attached evidence sheets. The lesson structure is simple to follow or teach even if you are not an experienced computer science teacher. This lesson covers the languages, algorithms and computation aspect from the national curriculum for computer science in England and Wales. Students will design, debug, test and discuss and document their own programs. Python Software required to teach this series of lessons can be downloaded from https://www.python.org/downloads/ without cost. Students can take advantage of this opportunity to practise their skills at home. Contact chris_vidal2000@yahoo.com for further advice or support.

By chris_vidal