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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.

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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.
Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet
AngelilAngelil

Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet

(6)
As part of the Global Perspectives IGCSE, students need to undertake a piece of individual research of at least 750 words, accompanied by a practical solution (e.g. film, T-shirts, posters, charity campaign...) that encourages community involvement and cross-cultural evaluation. For some students, particularly EAL/ESL pupils or those with processing/executive function disorders, this can be a daunting task, so a planning sheet is essential (even for those with good planning skills - as many 14-16-year-olds will never have attempted a task of this magnitude). The planning sheet forces students to identify a topic area and refine this into a specific question before writing down their main ideas and considering problems and possible solutions from multiple perspectives (local, global...).
Identify and evaluate knowledge claims (climate change) - Global Perspectives/TOK/Critical Thinking
AngelilAngelil

Identify and evaluate knowledge claims (climate change) - Global Perspectives/TOK/Critical Thinking

(1)
This worksheet helps students (especially EAL/ESL students) to identify knowledge claims (which they should have already been introduced to in a prior lesson), especially using elements of grammar with which they are familiar. They are then encouraged to think critically about whether or not certain ideas about climate change may be true, and why. The final italic line should be cut off with scissors and only given to students towards the end of the lesson (as extension or plenary) to encourage them to consider how the sources of information can affect their answers. This activity is particularly appropriate for students studying Global Perspectives, Theory of Knowledge, or Critical Thinking.
Analysing stage directions
AngelilAngelil

Analysing stage directions

(1)
This general worksheet helps students to analyse stage directions from any play, considering character, lighting, sounds, and other elements.
Information sheet - how to write a feature article
AngelilAngelil

Information sheet - how to write a feature article

(1)
This information sheet can be used by secondary students of all ages who need guidance on how to write a feature article. It encourages the use of statistics, illustrations and vox pops for the more mathematically and artistically minded English and media students.
Mental Health History Timetable
AngelilAngelil

Mental Health History Timetable

(1)
Adapted from the resource at http://www.studymore.org.uk/mhhtim.htm, this timeline details the history of mental health from ancient times through to the present day, showing the dates of significant moments such as groundbreaking campaigns, the opening of key mental health units and charities, and the passing of important mental health acts. Can be used as a source of good succinct background information for a project in history, social studies, PSHE/citizenship, science or literature.
Full unit plan: Le Grand Meaulnes
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Le Grand Meaulnes

(1)
This 16-lesson (4-week) unit plan for Alain-Fournier's novel, Le Grand Meaulnes, explores characterisation, setting, themes, techniques, and text-to-self connections, as well as the context of the author's life and the influence of these on the text. The unit is enhanced by the usage of other fictional and non-fictional texts, such as The Great Gatsby and articles from The Economist. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. They also create their own directed writing task based on the story, which is designed to demonstrate empathy and their understanding of plot and character, as well as command of authentic language appropriate to the text. The unit plan was designed for use with students of IGCSE World Literature, but could also be adapted for other (I)GCSEs in literature, as well as (I)GCSE, IB French B, or A-Level French.
The Sound of Waves - key quotes and ideas
AngelilAngelil

The Sound of Waves - key quotes and ideas

(1)
These notes on The Sound of Waves list potentially useful quotations from each chapter through the themes of innocence and experience (I have taught this text once privately and my student’s essay was based on this idea, so I read and made notes on the text with a view to helping her with this). Using the prism of these universal themes enables connections to be made between other curriculum texts, such as the poetry of William Blake and the plays of William Shakespeare. The notes are aimed at teachers (rather than students) and do not constitute full lesson plans in themselves but serve to provide inspiration for lessons depending on what skills and topics you hope to teach when instructing students on the novel. They provide opportunities to help students understand the effects of techniques such as simile and metaphor, foreshadowing, personification, pathetic fallacy, and symbolism. The notes also make links to critical thinking courses such as TOK (Theory of Knowledge) so can also be used by IB teachers to facilitate links to the Diploma core. Obviously all ideas presented in the notes are interpretations which you may agree or disagree with. Nonetheless, I hope they help!
Full Wuthering Heights unit WITH POWERPOINTS
AngelilAngelil

Full Wuthering Heights unit WITH POWERPOINTS

(1)
This Wuthering Heights unit is designed for students aged 16-18. The lesson plans are not fully developed with objectives etc but these should be implicitly clear and give you the freedom to adapt them for your own class. The lesson plans are based on the idea of virtually all reading being done in advance of the lesson taking place. Many lessons are supported by Powerpoints, but not all are.
Full unit plan: Hedda Gabler (Henrik Ibsen)
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Hedda Gabler (Henrik Ibsen)

(1)
This 16-lesson (4-week) unit plan for Henrik Ibsen's play, Hedda Gabler, explores characterisation, setting, themes, techniques, and text-to-self connections, as well as theatrical movements and practitioners and the influence of these on the play, and is enhanced by the contrasting cultures of production and reception via study of historical context. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. They devise their own adaptation of the play to form a 1-hour staged reading of the production.
Full year's lesson plans: Language and Mass Communications (IB DP English Lang/Lit)
AngelilAngelil

Full year's lesson plans: Language and Mass Communications (IB DP English Lang/Lit)

(1)
**PLEASE NOTE: These lesson plans pertain to the 'old', outgoing Lang/Lit course (final exams in 2020). While a lot of the material will still be usable in the new course (first exams 2021), please bear this in mind when purchasing and, subsequently, using the plans yourself (whether as written or to make your own). Thanks for your understanding!** This file contains at least 50 hours of lessons pertaining to Part 2 (Language and Mass Communications) of the English A: Language and Literature IB program. This would normally last you at least one academic year when interspersed with set text study and Part 1 (Language and Cultural Context) lessons (this equivalent pack is also available via TES). This is based on a schedule of 4 hours a week at standard level, with a supplementary hour per week at higher level. Topics include the analysis of social media and online language, advertisements, past paper practice lessons, persuasive speeches, journalistic texts, and historical and geographical contexts. Texts used are diverse and include texts from The Economist, The New York Times, The Huffington Post, and The Financial Times, as well as texts by writers such as Dave Barry, Camilla Long, and Earl Spencer. Tasks are differentiated and activities are suggested to support students in relation to TOK and other official IB assessments. Extra resources can be supplied upon request at no extra charge to support you as far as possible; where possible these are already free to download on TES. Created by an experienced IB teacher and examiner.
Henrik Ibsen: context sheet
AngelilAngelil

Henrik Ibsen: context sheet

(2)
This information sheet contextualises Ibsen's origins and family relationships as well as the theatrical movements by which his drama abides (naturalism/realism). The sheet also encourages students to link these to his plays.
Full unit plan: Stories of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Stories of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)

(1)
This 16-lesson (4-week) unit explores a prescribed selection of stories from volume 2 of Songs of Ourselves, as determined by Cambridge International Examinations. It helps students to analyse a variety of texts, techniques and historical and cultural contexts via a number of different media. Their studies will culminate in the production of a critical essay in line with CIE's requirements for official coursework. This unit was designed for students working towards CIE's IGCSE in World Literature, but could also be used for pupils (at GCSE, IGCSE, A Level, IB...) studying any of the short stories listed below: The Yellow Wallpaper (Charlotte Perkins Gilman) The Contest (Annie Proulx) On Her Knees (Tim Winton) Her First Ball (Katherine Mansfield) A Horse and Two Goats (RK Narayan) The Bath (Janet Frame) Journey (Shirley Geok-Lin Lim) The Third and Final Continent (Jhumpa Lahiri) The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) The Open Boat (Stephen Crane)
The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) - comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) - comprehension questions

(1)
These comprehension questions were designed for use by MA-HA (I)GCSE students reading Edith Wharton’s short story “The Moving Finger”. These questions could be completed all in one go after reading the whole story (perhaps as homework) or could be completed after reading each part (maybe as a class activity). The questions encourage students to consider how characters are developed and evolve, as well as their overall significance to the story, using evidence from the text to support their ideas. As such these could also be used as stimuli for essays or presentations (as opposed to short answers). The final question could be done as an extension activity in writing and/or the quotation given to all students as a starter or plenary activity.
Questions about obesity (Global Perspectives/Social Studies/PSHE)
AngelilAngelil

Questions about obesity (Global Perspectives/Social Studies/PSHE)

(0)
The attached questions about obesity can be used in social studies, PSHE and Global Perspectives lessons to explore the themes of the human body, health and disease. The questions encourage students to consider how society influences how we see overweight people, to identify the differences between underweight/healthy/overweight/obese/morbidly obese, to question whether someone can be healthy and overweight, to explain why we need fat in our bodies, and to research hereditary disorders such as Prader-Willi and Cushing's syndromes. All tasks could be completed by all students, or you could divide students into groups and give each group a different question which they then research/consider more thoroughly.
Life on the climate front line: comprehension exercise (Global Perspectives/Geography)
AngelilAngelil

Life on the climate front line: comprehension exercise (Global Perspectives/Geography)

(0)
The text file is taken from the Financial Times and talks about climate change in Tibet. Students should read this in advance and come to class with a list of vocabulary questions, which could be worked through in groups for speediness if there are many questions. If there are only a few questions, this could be done as a class. The comprehension questions help to gauge student understanding of the content and begin to assess their critical thinking skills. This exercise can be used for students aged 14-18 in subjects such as Geography and Global Perspectives.
Fast food study - Global Perspectives/PSHE/Social Studies
AngelilAngelil

Fast food study - Global Perspectives/PSHE/Social Studies

(0)
Students comparatively evaluate fast foods from different popular outlets based on calories, saturated fat, size (grams), appearance, taste, price and value. The task enables numeracy and literacy integration within social studies-style subjects (including Global Perspectives and PSHE) by asking them to create bar graphs and write commentaries based on their findings, which can then be used for display.
'Parlez-vous français?' (by Dave Barry) + comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

'Parlez-vous français?' (by Dave Barry) + comprehension questions

(0)
This column by Dave Barry can be used by secondary English students to understand cultural context, as well as how humour is created and used in writing. It can also be used by French classes for a tongue-in-cheek insight into French culture. The comprehension questions are as follows: How far does Dave Barry exaggerate? Is some of what he says true? Explain your answer. Give an example of how Dave Barry uses language in a humorous way. EXTENSION: What technique(s) does he use and why? Dave Barry also makes fun of Americans. How?
'France' (by Dave Barry) with comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

'France' (by Dave Barry) with comprehension questions

(0)
This text can be used by secondary students of all ages to understand how humour is created and used in writing. Comprehension questions are included. This is designed for use by English students, but could also be used in French classes for some tongue-in-cheek insight into French culture.