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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.

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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.
Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet
AngelilAngelil

Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet

(6)
As part of the Global Perspectives IGCSE, students need to undertake a piece of individual research of at least 750 words, accompanied by a practical solution (e.g. film, T-shirts, posters, charity campaign...) that encourages community involvement and cross-cultural evaluation. For some students, particularly EAL/ESL pupils or those with processing/executive function disorders, this can be a daunting task, so a planning sheet is essential (even for those with good planning skills - as many 14-16-year-olds will never have attempted a task of this magnitude). The planning sheet forces students to identify a topic area and refine this into a specific question before writing down their main ideas and considering problems and possible solutions from multiple perspectives (local, global...).
Mental Health History Timetable
AngelilAngelil

Mental Health History Timetable

(1)
Adapted from the resource at http://www.studymore.org.uk/mhhtim.htm, this timeline details the history of mental health from ancient times through to the present day, showing the dates of significant moments such as groundbreaking campaigns, the opening of key mental health units and charities, and the passing of important mental health acts. Can be used as a source of good succinct background information for a project in history, social studies, PSHE/citizenship, science or literature.
Analysing stage directions
AngelilAngelil

Analysing stage directions

(1)
This general worksheet helps students to analyse stage directions from any play, considering character, lighting, sounds, and other elements.
Identify and evaluate knowledge claims (climate change) - Global Perspectives/TOK/Critical Thinking
AngelilAngelil

Identify and evaluate knowledge claims (climate change) - Global Perspectives/TOK/Critical Thinking

(1)
This worksheet helps students (especially EAL/ESL students) to identify knowledge claims (which they should have already been introduced to in a prior lesson), especially using elements of grammar with which they are familiar. They are then encouraged to think critically about whether or not certain ideas about climate change may be true, and why. The final italic line should be cut off with scissors and only given to students towards the end of the lesson (as extension or plenary) to encourage them to consider how the sources of information can affect their answers. This activity is particularly appropriate for students studying Global Perspectives, Theory of Knowledge, or Critical Thinking.
Information sheet - how to write a feature article
AngelilAngelil

Information sheet - how to write a feature article

(1)
This information sheet can be used by secondary students of all ages who need guidance on how to write a feature article. It encourages the use of statistics, illustrations and vox pops for the more mathematically and artistically minded English and media students.
Possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour (sc 1)
AngelilAngelil

Possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour (sc 1)

(0)
This revision sheet lists possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour in scene 1 of A Streetcar Named Desire. Underneath are spaces for students to write in evidence from the scene supporting each point. This could therefore be used not just for revision but also as a scaffold for weaker students&' essay-writing.
Life on the climate front line: comprehension exercise (Global Perspectives/Geography)
AngelilAngelil

Life on the climate front line: comprehension exercise (Global Perspectives/Geography)

(0)
The text file is taken from the Financial Times and talks about climate change in Tibet. Students should read this in advance and come to class with a list of vocabulary questions, which could be worked through in groups for speediness if there are many questions. If there are only a few questions, this could be done as a class. The comprehension questions help to gauge student understanding of the content and begin to assess their critical thinking skills. This exercise can be used for students aged 14-18 in subjects such as Geography and Global Perspectives.
Fast food study - Global Perspectives/PSHE/Social Studies
AngelilAngelil

Fast food study - Global Perspectives/PSHE/Social Studies

(0)
Students comparatively evaluate fast foods from different popular outlets based on calories, saturated fat, size (grams), appearance, taste, price and value. The task enables numeracy and literacy integration within social studies-style subjects (including Global Perspectives and PSHE) by asking them to create bar graphs and write commentaries based on their findings, which can then be used for display.
Questions about obesity (Global Perspectives/Social Studies/PSHE)
AngelilAngelil

Questions about obesity (Global Perspectives/Social Studies/PSHE)

(0)
The attached questions about obesity can be used in social studies, PSHE and Global Perspectives lessons to explore the themes of the human body, health and disease. The questions encourage students to consider how society influences how we see overweight people, to identify the differences between underweight/healthy/overweight/obese/morbidly obese, to question whether someone can be healthy and overweight, to explain why we need fat in our bodies, and to research hereditary disorders such as Prader-Willi and Cushing's syndromes. All tasks could be completed by all students, or you could divide students into groups and give each group a different question which they then research/consider more thoroughly.
Henrik Ibsen: context sheet
AngelilAngelil

Henrik Ibsen: context sheet

(2)
This information sheet contextualises Ibsen's origins and family relationships as well as the theatrical movements by which his drama abides (naturalism/realism). The sheet also encourages students to link these to his plays.
Christmas advertisements
AngelilAngelil

Christmas advertisements

(0)
These Christmas ads can be stuck to the wall so that your students can react to them in relation to context, audience, purpose and style. If laminated on first printing they can be used for years to come. Students can annotate using Post-It notes. If you are in a rush, then just print them and have students write on them directly. Colour printing is highly recommended. These posters are mainly of use to A-Level/IB students, but could also be used for (I)GCSE language and media courses. Note: one of the posters is appropriate for 16+ only.
resources to go with The Great Gatsby lesson pack
AngelilAngelil

resources to go with The Great Gatsby lesson pack

(0)
Many of these resources were made by Penguin to support work on The Great Gatsby. They are also referred to in my lesson plan pack, available for download on TES. There is also a file containing ideas for teaching The Great Gatsby, compiled from around the internet. Finally, there is an article about flappers that can be used with your most able students.
'Parlez-vous français?' (by Dave Barry) + comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

'Parlez-vous français?' (by Dave Barry) + comprehension questions

(0)
This column by Dave Barry can be used by secondary English students to understand cultural context, as well as how humour is created and used in writing. It can also be used by French classes for a tongue-in-cheek insight into French culture. The comprehension questions are as follows: How far does Dave Barry exaggerate? Is some of what he says true? Explain your answer. Give an example of how Dave Barry uses language in a humorous way. EXTENSION: What technique(s) does he use and why? Dave Barry also makes fun of Americans. How?
'France' (by Dave Barry) with comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

'France' (by Dave Barry) with comprehension questions

(0)
This text can be used by secondary students of all ages to understand how humour is created and used in writing. Comprehension questions are included. This is designed for use by English students, but could also be used in French classes for some tongue-in-cheek insight into French culture.
Sonnet features: table to complete
AngelilAngelil

Sonnet features: table to complete

(0)
This worksheet encourages students to identify key sonnet features (iambic pentameter, volta, syllabic count), give examples of these, and comment on effects.
Weblog pack: reactions to changes to Enid Blyton's books
AngelilAngelil

Weblog pack: reactions to changes to Enid Blyton's books

(0)
This weblog pack consists of a compilation of blog entries which appeared online on a variety of websites after certain Enid Blyton books were reissued with changes to characters' names (e.g. Jo-> Joe) and actions (Dame Slap apparently only snaps now). The blog pack can be issued in its entirety to each child or it can be divided up and individual blog entries given to students according to their level of English (the entries vary in length and complexity). The blog entries also present a variety of viewpoints. A great way to discuss language change with secondary students of all ages alongside other topics such as revisionism. Possible questions for students include: Why are people so demonstrably upset by the changes? Is their protest reasonable (why/why not)? Is it right to change parts of an author’s work once it has been published (why/why not)?