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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.

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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.
Classical characters in Translations (Brian Friel)
Angelil

Classical characters in Translations (Brian Friel)

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This worksheet/activity is designed for MA-HA A Level/IB English A students. It provides the references made in the play to characters from classical literature/mythology, in the order in which they are mentioned in the play, so is a great resource for revision. Students can work in class or at home to locate the quotation where the character is mentioned (if they put act/scene numbers this helps their essay-writing/referencing skills generally). Students are then encouraged to explain the significance of this being included (this column in the chart could be an extension task for those of higher ability, or all students could be asked to do it). Prompts are included to help students with the explanation/aid differentation.
Analysing language and its effects (Bao Ninh's "The Sorrow of War")
Angelil

Analysing language and its effects (Bao Ninh's "The Sorrow of War")

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This resource consists of anonymised quotations from real sixth-form student essays about Bao Ninh’s language use in the opening pages of “The Sorrow of War”. By asking students to identify what is good about them and what could be improved, it is possible to not only develop their justifications/opinions of these aspects of the novel itself, but also to allow students to critique the quality of the analysis. This helps to develop metacognitive and essay-writing skills as well as knowledge of the text. As such, it can be used with students who have no experience of the novel, as well as with students who are studying the novel directly. It would make a great starter/plenary activity, especially in the context of revision of the novel or essay-writing classes.
Full year's lesson plans: Language and Cultural Context (IB DP English Lang/Lit)
Angelil

Full year's lesson plans: Language and Cultural Context (IB DP English Lang/Lit)

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This file contains at least 50 hours of lessons pertaining to Part 1 (Language and Cultural Context) of the English A: Language and Literature IB program. This would normally last you at least one academic year when taught alongside a minimum of 2 IB set texts (based on a schedule of 4 hours a week at standard level, with a supplementary hour per week at higher level). Topics include spoken language, censorship, translation, metalanguage, and historical and geographical contexts. Texts used include Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, Amy Tan's Mother Tongue, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time, and Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal. Tasks are differentiated and activities are suggested to support students in TOK and with their extended essay, as well as to support you in the event of your absence from school. Extra resources can be supplied upon request at no extra charge to support you as far as possible. Created by an experienced IB teacher and examiner.
Full year's lesson plans: Language and Mass Communications (IB DP English Lang/Lit)
Angelil

Full year's lesson plans: Language and Mass Communications (IB DP English Lang/Lit)

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This file contains at least 50 hours of lessons pertaining to Part 2 (Language and Mass Communications) of the English A: Language and Literature IB program. This would normally last you at least one academic year when interspersed with set text study and Part 1 (Language and Cultural Context) lessons (this equivalent pack is also available via TES). This is based on a schedule of 4 hours a week at standard level, with a supplementary hour per week at higher level. Topics include the analysis of social media and online language, advertisements, past paper practice lessons, persuasive speeches, journalistic texts, and historical and geographical contexts. Texts used are diverse and include texts from The Economist, The New York Times, The Huffington Post, and The Financial Times, as well as texts by writers such as Dave Barry, Camilla Long, and Earl Spencer. Tasks are differentiated and activities are suggested to support students in relation to TOK and other official IB assessments. Extra resources can be supplied upon request at no extra charge to support you as far as possible; where possible these are already free to download on TES. Created by an experienced IB teacher and examiner.
Mental Health History Timetable
Angelil

Mental Health History Timetable

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Adapted from the resource at http://www.studymore.org.uk/mhhtim.htm, this timeline details the history of mental health from ancient times through to the present day, showing the dates of significant moments such as groundbreaking campaigns, the opening of key mental health units and charities, and the passing of important mental health acts. Can be used as a source of good succinct background information for a project in history, social studies, PSHE/citizenship, science or literature.
Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet
Angelil

Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet

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As part of the Global Perspectives IGCSE, students need to undertake a piece of individual research of at least 750 words, accompanied by a practical solution (e.g. film, T-shirts, posters, charity campaign...) that encourages community involvement and cross-cultural evaluation. For some students, particularly EAL/ESL pupils or those with processing/executive function disorders, this can be a daunting task, so a planning sheet is essential (even for those with good planning skills - as many 14-16-year-olds will never have attempted a task of this magnitude). The planning sheet forces students to identify a topic area and refine this into a specific question before writing down their main ideas and considering problems and possible solutions from multiple perspectives (local, global...).
Information sheet - how to write a feature article
Angelil

Information sheet - how to write a feature article

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This information sheet can be used by secondary students of all ages who need guidance on how to write a feature article. It encourages the use of statistics, illustrations and vox pops for the more mathematically and artistically minded English and media students.
The Open Boat (Stephen Crane) - techniques worksheet
Angelil

The Open Boat (Stephen Crane) - techniques worksheet

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This worksheet covers techniques used in parts 1 and 2 of Stephen Crane’s short story “The Open Boat”. It was designed for MA-HA (I)GCSE students. Students are encouraged to match literary and linguistic techniques with their definitions before filling out a table that shows they can identify these techniques being used within the text, as well as finding quotations to support them. A third column is included in the table by way of extension, with students being asked to explain the effect this has if they can.
Full unit plan: Stories of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)
Angelil

Full unit plan: Stories of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit explores a prescribed selection of stories from volume 2 of Songs of Ourselves, as determined by Cambridge International Examinations. It helps students to analyse a variety of texts, techniques and historical and cultural contexts via a number of different media. Their studies will culminate in the production of a critical essay in line with CIE's requirements for official coursework. This unit was designed for students working towards CIE's IGCSE in World Literature, but could also be used for pupils (at GCSE, IGCSE, A Level, IB...) studying any of the short stories listed below: The Yellow Wallpaper (Charlotte Perkins Gilman) The Contest (Annie Proulx) On Her Knees (Tim Winton) Her First Ball (Katherine Mansfield) A Horse and Two Goats (RK Narayan) The Bath (Janet Frame) Journey (Shirley Geok-Lin Lim) The Third and Final Continent (Jhumpa Lahiri) The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) The Open Boat (Stephen Crane)
The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) - comprehension questions
Angelil

The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) - comprehension questions

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These comprehension questions were designed for use by MA-HA (I)GCSE students reading Edith Wharton’s short story “The Moving Finger”. These questions could be completed all in one go after reading the whole story (perhaps as homework) or could be completed after reading each part (maybe as a class activity). The questions encourage students to consider how characters are developed and evolve, as well as their overall significance to the story, using evidence from the text to support their ideas. As such these could also be used as stimuli for essays or presentations (as opposed to short answers). The final question could be done as an extension activity in writing and/or the quotation given to all students as a starter or plenary activity.
Full unit plan: Le Grand Meaulnes
Angelil

Full unit plan: Le Grand Meaulnes

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit plan for Alain-Fournier's novel, Le Grand Meaulnes, explores characterisation, setting, themes, techniques, and text-to-self connections, as well as the context of the author's life and the influence of these on the text. The unit is enhanced by the usage of other fictional and non-fictional texts, such as The Great Gatsby and articles from The Economist. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. They also create their own directed writing task based on the story, which is designed to demonstrate empathy and their understanding of plot and character, as well as command of authentic language appropriate to the text. The unit plan was designed for use with students of IGCSE World Literature, but could also be adapted for other (I)GCSEs in literature, as well as (I)GCSE, IB French B, or A-Level French.
Authorial and narratorial reliability: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)
Angelil

Authorial and narratorial reliability: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)

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This grid is intended to encourage sixth-formers studying the novel “The Sorrow of War” to consider the reliability of both its author (Bao Ninh) and protagonist (Kien), as well as areas where the two intersect. This is also a chance to develop their abilities in terms of supporting their ideas with evidence from the text. Aimed at MA-HA students. Examples could be filled in by the teacher (maybe one per box) along with possible sentence stems for explanation to support lower-ability students. The resource could also be adapted for use with any other text that has an unreliable narrator and/or author.
Statement-question-response grid: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)
Angelil

Statement-question-response grid: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)

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The statements and questions in this grid about Bao Ninh’s novel “The Sorrow of War” were provided by real sixth-form students, with development in the brackets being provided by me. The third column in the chart is left blank so that your students can fill in their own responses to the ideas. It may be prudent to print this on A3 paper so that students have sufficient space to write, and/or upload a copy to your school’s VLE so that students can download and type directly onto a digital copy. Excellent for revision.
The Caged Skylark (Gerard Manley Hopkins) - worksheet
Angelil

The Caged Skylark (Gerard Manley Hopkins) - worksheet

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This worksheet was designed for use by MA-HA (I)GCSE students learning about Hopkins’ poem “The Caged Skylark”. The grid on the sheet encourages them to identify techniques and imagery used to compare the man and skylark, and to cite examples using line numbers. There is also room for students to expand upon their observations, which could be used as extension. This activity could be completed in groups or alone in class, used as homework, or completed for revision.
Concrete - abstract - proper nouns
Angelil

Concrete - abstract - proper nouns

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This is a useful worksheet to be used as part of a wider selection of class activities or if you need cover work. It defines concrete, abstract and proper nouns, and then gives students a selection to sort into a chart (provided). Five should then be chosen and used in students’ own sentences. Depending on where you are, you could either remove the example of ‘God’ or use it as a stimulus for debate (proper or abstract, or both?). This latter activity could also segue nicely into a lesson on discursive or argumentative writing. This activity is aimed at KS3 but has a broad range of appeal depending on your students’ needs: it could for example be used with able KS2s or with KS4s who lack grammatical knowledge.
Blackberrying (Sylvia Plath) - literary and linguistic techniques
Angelil

Blackberrying (Sylvia Plath) - literary and linguistic techniques

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This worksheet/activity is designed to follow on from a lesson covering the poem’s content. Once students have understood its content, the sheet can be used. The first task encourages students to match techniques found in the poem with definitions. (Students can also find examples from the poem once they are done.) Suggested follow-up activities, mentioned on the sheet, include inviting students to guess information about the poem’s time period and author, and asking students to explain why the literary/linguistic techniques are used (with sentence stems included to start them off). Aimed at MA-HA KS3 but could also be used with KS4.
Fact sheet: IRA (Irish Republican Army)
Angelil

Fact sheet: IRA (Irish Republican Army)

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This is a fact sheet about the IRA designed to be distributed to students, or for teachers to use to give them some background knowledge. It has been adapted/created based on Wikipedia so naturally is basic/has limitations, but is suitable for student use and for teachers who are not history specialists. It can be useful for English teachers who are teaching plays or novels where this history is relevant, such as Brian Friel’s “Translations” or Joan Lingard’s “Across The Barricades”.
Forms of abandonment in "The Sorrow of War" - PEE grid
Angelil

Forms of abandonment in "The Sorrow of War" - PEE grid

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This point - evidence - explanation grid was designed for students of Bao Ninh’s novel “The Sorrow of War”. Students are given page numbers to help with the activity. Unfortunately both the “red edition” and “black edition” are published by Vintage so it is difficult to be more specific about this on the worksheet. Students should use the page numbers given to identify forms of abandonment, before then adding a quotation and page number to go with it. They then have to explain the importance of their chosen example. This is best done in groups as otherwise students can get bogged down by the scale of the task. It is therefore aimed at MA-HA A Level/IB students, with a further extension activity included for your most able.
Full unit plan: Songs of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)
Angelil

Full unit plan: Songs of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit explores a variety of poetry from the 1500s to the present day. It examines several aspects of poetry, including specialist structures, rhythm, rhyme and meter, as well as techniques common to several types of literature, including personification, alliteration, and onomatopoeia. An effort is made in the unit to encourage text-to-self, text-to-world, and text-to-text connections in the pupils' readings. Contextual information about the lives of the poets studied is introduced as and when it is relevant, as opposed to systematically. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. Their studies of poetry culminate in the production of a piece of official coursework – an essay addressing a key theme across several poems studied. The unit was designed for students studying the Cambridge IGCSE in World Literature, but could easily adapted for (I)GCSE, IB or A-Level students studying the same poems. The poems for which there are lesson plans in this unit are as follows: Futility (Wilfred Owen) The Death Bed (Siegfried Sassoon) First March (Ivor Gurney) Last Sonnet (John Keats) If thou must love me (Elizabeth Barrett Browning) lion heart (Amanda Chong) I years had been from home (Emily Dickinson) Homecoming (Lenrie Peters) The Border-Builder (Carol Rumens) Rhyme of the Dead Self (ARD Fairburn) The Caged Skylark (Gerard Manley Hopkins) Song (George Szirtes) The Road (Nancy Cato)
Full Wuthering Heights unit WITH POWERPOINTS
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Full Wuthering Heights unit WITH POWERPOINTS

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This Wuthering Heights unit is designed for students aged 16-18. The lesson plans are not fully developed with objectives etc but these should be implicitly clear and give you the freedom to adapt them for your own class. The lesson plans are based on the idea of virtually all reading being done in advance of the lesson taking place. Many lessons are supported by Powerpoints, but not all are.