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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.

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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.
WW1 letters comprehension/analysis activities
AngelilAngelil

WW1 letters comprehension/analysis activities

(0)
This resource collates multiple WW1 letters from an American soldier, deployed in France, to his father back home in the US. The ensuing activities check on students’ comprehension of vocabulary and ask them to analyse the context, audience, purpose, and stylistic elements of the text. Best for students with some confidence at doing this already but could be adapted for weaker students or students who are only just starting to develop these skills. If using the final analysis-writing activity this could easily stretch to 2-3 lessons depending on the amount of groundwork you need to lay with your students beforehand. An alternative approach could be, for instance, to carousel the reading and analysis of letters so that e.g. a small group just works with one letter.
Possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour (sc 1)
AngelilAngelil

Possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour (sc 1)

(0)
This revision sheet lists possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour in scene 1 of A Streetcar Named Desire. Underneath are spaces for students to write in evidence from the scene supporting each point. This could therefore be used not just for revision but also as a scaffold for weaker students&' essay-writing.
Text types revision PPT
AngelilAngelil

Text types revision PPT

(1)
This Powerpoint is most suitable for IB Diploma (Language A) or A Level language and literature students looking to revise text types. The Powerpoint covers the features of the following text types, as well as things that students can look for/consider when analysing an unseen text of this type: News article Editorial Blog or diary entry Political cartoons Graphic novels Brochures and leaflets Forum posts Academic journal articles Reviews Speeches and talks Tweets Letters and emails Interviews Advertisements Infographics The resource also covers reminders of the purposes of writing, the differences between literary and linguistic features, and further tips to enhance performance in analytical tasks of this nature (e.g. commenting on context, planning skills). This is not intended to serve as a full lesson in itself but could potentially be developed by teachers to create one according to the needs of their class. It’s perhaps more appropriate as a revision resource to be distributed for students’ own independent learning.
THE DEMON HEADMASTER 6-week unit plan
AngelilAngelil

THE DEMON HEADMASTER 6-week unit plan

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This unit of work is designed to guide Year 8/Grade 7 students through Gillian Cross' The Demon Headmaster. While Teachit resources are referenced (and are available for free download via that website), many other resources and activities are also included, which are designed to stretch students in this age bracket given the text involved. Ultimately, however, it is accessible to all, including ESL, with various differentiation suggestions included (e.g. vocabulary-based activities).
Idioms
AngelilAngelil

Idioms

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This activity has 3 separate parts. After eliciting a class definition of idioms from students, the worksheet requires them to match idioms with their true meanings. Interesting discussion could follow, not just to correct the answers, but to explain how they knew/guessed if they were unsure. Students can then write sentences using the idioms before developing their ideas into a story (more than one idiom could be used in the story - e.g. through dialogue - or one idiom could be developed more thoroughly into a narrative). This was originally made to use with KS3 but could also be used with able KS2s.
Media bias (UK) - webquest
AngelilAngelil

Media bias (UK) - webquest

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This webquest encourages students to investigate a variety of topics relating to media bias, including: what is bias factors influencing media bias how to assess whether bias is being used political agendas in the press balance of media coverage how readers of different newspapers tend to vote This webquest involves the use of a variety of skills, such as: interpreting data finding examples of facts and opinions in texts reading academic research summary-writing the use of in-text citations Students will read a variety of texts as part of this webquest, including: letters to newspapers fact-checkers First News research from the University of Oxford and the University of Hannover statistics from public opinion and data companies, such as YouGov and Statista Video resources are also included, along with ‘shortcuts’ for learners who can’t handle a full text, as well as a “go further” activity. The webquest is designed to not only develop students’ knowledge and understanding of bias, but also to develop their critical thinking skills. The resource is suitable for students aged 14 and up, particularly those studying Media, English Language, Global Perspectives, PSHE, Citizenship, TOK, Critical Thinking, or General Studies. This editable resource is designed for online learning, as students can type their responses directly into the document and click on the links directly. If uploaded to a collaborative workspace such as Google Docs, students could also work in groups to complete the webquest.
Character impressions grid: Death and the King's Horseman
AngelilAngelil

Character impressions grid: Death and the King's Horseman

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This grid serves as an ongoing revision resource that students build up themselves over time. It encourages students to take notes on characters encountered in Wole Soyinka’s play “Death and the King’s Horseman”, including appearance, speech, and attitudes. This grid could then be used to help students plan an essay on any topic relevant to the notes they have taken (e.g. compare/contrast 2 characters’ attitudes towards the British). Printing on A3 is recommended.
Ode to a Nightingale (Keats) comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

Ode to a Nightingale (Keats) comprehension questions

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These two pages of comprehension questions are divided by stanza, enabling students to work on these as they progress through the poem and allowing teachers to use them as a carousel or jigsaw activity if preferred. The questions cover comprehension of techniques (e.g. imagery, symbolism, allusion) as well as ideas.
Literary and linguistic techniques matching game
AngelilAngelil

Literary and linguistic techniques matching game

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This literary and linguistic techniques matching game could be printed, laminated and cut out so that students can use it kinaesthetically (which is how I used it) or distributed as a worksheet where students just draw lines between the terms and their definitions (but you would need to mix up the definitions in the document first!). It was designed for IGCSE students but could be used throughout secondary depending on your students’ abilities. It includes literary devices such as flashbacks, as well as linguistic devices such as complex sentences. Great as a starter or plenary activity, or for revision.
Concrete - abstract - proper nouns
AngelilAngelil

Concrete - abstract - proper nouns

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This is a useful worksheet to be used as part of a wider selection of class activities or if you need cover work. It defines concrete, abstract and proper nouns, and then gives students a selection to sort into a chart (provided). Five should then be chosen and used in students’ own sentences. Depending on where you are, you could either remove the example of ‘God’ or use it as a stimulus for debate (proper or abstract, or both?). This latter activity could also segue nicely into a lesson on discursive or argumentative writing. This activity is aimed at KS3 but has a broad range of appeal depending on your students’ needs: it could for example be used with able KS2s or with KS4s who lack grammatical knowledge.
Comprehension activity - Black Roses (Simon Armitage)
AngelilAngelil

Comprehension activity - Black Roses (Simon Armitage)

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This file consists of 9 questions in relation to poems 4-6 from Simon Armitage’s Black Roses collection. (The questions are repeated twice on one page in the file for easy printing/cutting out/distribution). Students could complete these in small groups or on their own. These were devised for a sixth-form group of EAL students. However, they could be used in KS4 as well (not sure I would recommend for KS3 as the content of the Black Roses collection could be disturbing for children who are too young).
Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet
AngelilAngelil

Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet

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As part of the Global Perspectives IGCSE, students need to undertake a piece of individual research of at least 750 words, accompanied by a practical solution (e.g. film, T-shirts, posters, charity campaign…) that encourages community involvement and cross-cultural evaluation. For some students, particularly EAL/ESL pupils or those with processing/executive function disorders, this can be a daunting task, so a planning sheet is essential (even for those with good planning skills - as many 14-16-year-olds will never have attempted a task of this magnitude). The planning sheet forces students to identify a topic area and refine this into a specific question before writing down their main ideas and considering problems and possible solutions from multiple perspectives (local, global…).
Identify and evaluate knowledge claims (climate change) - Global Perspectives/TOK/Critical Thinking
AngelilAngelil

Identify and evaluate knowledge claims (climate change) - Global Perspectives/TOK/Critical Thinking

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This worksheet helps students (especially EAL/ESL students) to identify knowledge claims (which they should have already been introduced to in a prior lesson), especially using elements of grammar with which they are familiar. They are then encouraged to think critically about whether or not certain ideas about climate change may be true, and why. The final italic line should be cut off with scissors and only given to students towards the end of the lesson (as extension or plenary) to encourage them to consider how the sources of information can affect their answers. This activity is particularly appropriate for students studying Global Perspectives, Theory of Knowledge, or Critical Thinking.
Contextual information: Machiavelli
AngelilAngelil

Contextual information: Machiavelli

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This handout is designed to provide students with background information regarding Machiavelli. Presented as a list of bullet points for easier absorption of information, the text is also printed three times on one page for ease of photocopying/printing and distribution. Useful for the study of both English and History.
Full Wuthering Heights unit WITH POWERPOINTS
AngelilAngelil

Full Wuthering Heights unit WITH POWERPOINTS

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This Wuthering Heights unit is designed for students aged 16-18. The lesson plans are not fully developed with objectives etc but these should be implicitly clear and give you the freedom to adapt them for your own class. The lesson plans are based on the idea of virtually all reading being done in advance of the lesson taking place. Many lessons are supported by Powerpoints, but not all are.
Descriptive writing PPT based on Curious Incident
AngelilAngelil

Descriptive writing PPT based on Curious Incident

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This resource is a great introduction to descriptive writing for students in Years 8-9. It uses Mark Haddon’s “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” as a stimulus but you could adapt this to suit any text where the character finds a journey difficult. The PPT should get you through a minimum of 2 lessons depending on your students’ abilities. It goes through the basics of getting students to name the five senses and to talk about journeys they have completed, before progressing to finding textual evidence for why Christopher finds his journey to London difficult and planning/creating their own piece of descriptive writing based on a journey. Opportunities for peer assessment are also included.
Terminology for analysing comics and graphic novels
AngelilAngelil

Terminology for analysing comics and graphic novels

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This handout provides students with a glossary and definitions of key terms to help them analyse comics (e.g. political strips in newspapers) and graphic novels (e.g. Maus, Fun Home, Persepolis), and is useful for revision purposes so that students can use the correct terminology accurately in assessment situations.
Reliability in 'The Handmaid's Tale'
AngelilAngelil

Reliability in 'The Handmaid's Tale'

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This resource relates to the end of Margaret Atwood’s novel ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ and contains questions encouraging students to assess the reliability of the novel, its narrator, and its ending. This helps to integrate critical thinking into English lessons, and as such is especially helpful for teachers teaching the text as part of the IB Diploma programme, which requires integration of the IB core component of Theory of Knowledge.
Comprehension questions: Presents From My Aunts in Pakistan
AngelilAngelil

Comprehension questions: Presents From My Aunts in Pakistan

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This resource consists of 7 comprehension questions (printed on the page three times for ease of printing/distribution) based on the Moniza Alvi poem ‘Presents from my Aunts in Pakistan’. The questions help students to interpret the use of techniques including juxtaposition, metaphor, and imagery, and to better understand the effects of these on the reader.
Personification/anthropomorphism examples PPT
AngelilAngelil

Personification/anthropomorphism examples PPT

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This Powerpoint introduces the etymology of ‘anthropomorphism’ and explains the differences between personification and anthropomorphism. The PPT then showcases examples of texts which use these, before setting students a task to anthropomorphise a classroom object and write a monologue ‘in character’ (students should be familiar with monologue-writing). There is still scope to add additional imagery/animations to the PPT if desired, as well as film clips (e.g. Fantastic Mr Fox, Toy Story, Cars).