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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.

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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.
The Open Boat (Stephen Crane) - techniques worksheet
AngelilAngelil

The Open Boat (Stephen Crane) - techniques worksheet

(0)
This worksheet covers techniques used in parts 1 and 2 of Stephen Crane’s short story “The Open Boat”. It was designed for MA-HA (I)GCSE students. Students are encouraged to match literary and linguistic techniques with their definitions before filling out a table that shows they can identify these techniques being used within the text, as well as finding quotations to support them. A third column is included in the table by way of extension, with students being asked to explain the effect this has if they can.
The Sound of Waves - key quotes and ideas
AngelilAngelil

The Sound of Waves - key quotes and ideas

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These notes on The Sound of Waves list potentially useful quotations from each chapter through the themes of innocence and experience (I have taught this text once privately and my student’s essay was based on this idea, so I read and made notes on the text with a view to helping her with this). Using the prism of these universal themes enables connections to be made between other curriculum texts, such as the poetry of William Blake and the plays of William Shakespeare. The notes are aimed at teachers (rather than students) and do not constitute full lesson plans in themselves but serve to provide inspiration for lessons depending on what skills and topics you hope to teach when instructing students on the novel. They provide opportunities to help students understand the effects of techniques such as simile and metaphor, foreshadowing, personification, pathetic fallacy, and symbolism. The notes also make links to critical thinking courses such as TOK (Theory of Knowledge) so can also be used by IB teachers to facilitate links to the Diploma core. Obviously all ideas presented in the notes are interpretations which you may agree or disagree with. Nonetheless, I hope they help!
Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet
AngelilAngelil

Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet

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As part of the Global Perspectives IGCSE, students need to undertake a piece of individual research of at least 750 words, accompanied by a practical solution (e.g. film, T-shirts, posters, charity campaign...) that encourages community involvement and cross-cultural evaluation. For some students, particularly EAL/ESL pupils or those with processing/executive function disorders, this can be a daunting task, so a planning sheet is essential (even for those with good planning skills - as many 14-16-year-olds will never have attempted a task of this magnitude). The planning sheet forces students to identify a topic area and refine this into a specific question before writing down their main ideas and considering problems and possible solutions from multiple perspectives (local, global...).
Information sheet - how to write a feature article
AngelilAngelil

Information sheet - how to write a feature article

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This information sheet can be used by secondary students of all ages who need guidance on how to write a feature article. It encourages the use of statistics, illustrations and vox pops for the more mathematically and artistically minded English and media students.
Possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour (sc 1)
AngelilAngelil

Possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour (sc 1)

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This revision sheet lists possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour in scene 1 of A Streetcar Named Desire. Underneath are spaces for students to write in evidence from the scene supporting each point. This could therefore be used not just for revision but also as a scaffold for weaker students&' essay-writing.
Full unit plan: Le Grand Meaulnes
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Le Grand Meaulnes

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit plan for Alain-Fournier's novel, Le Grand Meaulnes, explores characterisation, setting, themes, techniques, and text-to-self connections, as well as the context of the author's life and the influence of these on the text. The unit is enhanced by the usage of other fictional and non-fictional texts, such as The Great Gatsby and articles from The Economist. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. They also create their own directed writing task based on the story, which is designed to demonstrate empathy and their understanding of plot and character, as well as command of authentic language appropriate to the text. The unit plan was designed for use with students of IGCSE World Literature, but could also be adapted for other (I)GCSEs in literature, as well as (I)GCSE, IB French B, or A-Level French.
Rhapsody on a Windy Night (TS Eliot) - technique + quotation matching game
AngelilAngelil

Rhapsody on a Windy Night (TS Eliot) - technique + quotation matching game

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This resource is designed to be printed and laminated so that students can match techniques and quotations from TS Eliot’s poem “Rhapsody on a Windy Night”. It was designed for IB Diploma Programme English Language & Literature students (so KS5) but could be used with able KS4 students too. After completing the activity students can be given a non-laminated version of the file to keep (all techniques are aligned with the correct answers). Techniques covered include anaphora, personification, themes, and iambic rhythm. Great as a starter or main activity.
Full unit plan: Hedda Gabler (Henrik Ibsen)
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Hedda Gabler (Henrik Ibsen)

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit plan for Henrik Ibsen's play, Hedda Gabler, explores characterisation, setting, themes, techniques, and text-to-self connections, as well as theatrical movements and practitioners and the influence of these on the play, and is enhanced by the contrasting cultures of production and reception via study of historical context. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. They devise their own adaptation of the play to form a 1-hour staged reading of the production.
Literary and linguistic techniques matching game
AngelilAngelil

Literary and linguistic techniques matching game

(0)
This literary and linguistic techniques matching game could be printed, laminated and cut out so that students can use it kinaesthetically (which is how I used it) or distributed as a worksheet where students just draw lines between the terms and their definitions (but you would need to mix up the definitions in the document first!). It was designed for IGCSE students but could be used throughout secondary depending on your students’ abilities. It includes literary devices such as flashbacks, as well as linguistic devices such as complex sentences. Great as a starter or plenary activity, or for revision.
'Bright Star' sonnet (John Keats) - comprehension activities
AngelilAngelil

'Bright Star' sonnet (John Keats) - comprehension activities

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These comprehension questions on John Keats’ Bright Star sonnet were designed for (I)GCSE students studying the poem but could also be used for A Level/IB students. The 4-page pack includes a copy of the poem as well as a vocabulary matching activity, space for handwritten definitions of any other unfamiliar vocabulary, note-taking space, comprehension questions, and an optional extension task.
Full Wuthering Heights unit WITH POWERPOINTS
AngelilAngelil

Full Wuthering Heights unit WITH POWERPOINTS

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This Wuthering Heights unit is designed for students aged 16-18. The lesson plans are not fully developed with objectives etc but these should be implicitly clear and give you the freedom to adapt them for your own class. The lesson plans are based on the idea of virtually all reading being done in advance of the lesson taking place. Many lessons are supported by Powerpoints, but not all are.
The Demon Headmaster, chapters 2 and 3: techniques and effects
AngelilAngelil

The Demon Headmaster, chapters 2 and 3: techniques and effects

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This chart helps students to identify techniques used by Gillian Cross in chapters 2 and 3 of The Demon Headmaster. Alliteration and assonance are the most obvious ones to focus on but this can be adapted according to your students’ existing skills (other possibilities include repetition, emphasis, metaphors and imperatives). Students also have space to give examples/quotes to support their ideas. Higher ability students are encouraged to fill in the third column to explain the effects of the techniques used. Aimed at MA-HA KS3 students.
Comprehension questions Le Grand Meaulnes/The Lost Estate (Chapters 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 8)
AngelilAngelil

Comprehension questions Le Grand Meaulnes/The Lost Estate (Chapters 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 8)

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These comprehension questions can be completed by students in groups or on their own, in class or as homework. They are also great revision resources and can be handy if you need to set cover work. Multiple copies of the questions are duplicated on one sheet in some cases, for ease of printing, photocopying, and distribution. The questions are designed for MA-HA students and range from identification and interpretation of techniques used (such as paradox) to encouraging students to explore issues surrounding translation, narratorial reliability, and choices of nomenclature in the novel. Motif and symbolism are also covered. Some extension tasks are included. These questions were originally developed for use by KS4 students working towards their IGCSE in World Literature. They could also be used for native French speakers, or students of IB/A Level French (although they would of course need to be translated).
Analysing language and its effects (Bao Ninh's "The Sorrow of War")
AngelilAngelil

Analysing language and its effects (Bao Ninh's "The Sorrow of War")

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This resource consists of anonymised quotations from real sixth-form student essays about Bao Ninh’s language use in the opening pages of “The Sorrow of War”. By asking students to identify what is good about them and what could be improved, it is possible to not only develop their justifications/opinions of these aspects of the novel itself, but also to allow students to critique the quality of the analysis. This helps to develop metacognitive and essay-writing skills as well as knowledge of the text. As such, it can be used with students who have no experience of the novel, as well as with students who are studying the novel directly. It would make a great starter/plenary activity, especially in the context of revision of the novel or essay-writing classes.
Statement-question-response grid: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)
AngelilAngelil

Statement-question-response grid: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)

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The statements and questions in this grid about Bao Ninh’s novel “The Sorrow of War” were provided by real sixth-form students, with development in the brackets being provided by me. The third column in the chart is left blank so that your students can fill in their own responses to the ideas. It may be prudent to print this on A3 paper so that students have sufficient space to write, and/or upload a copy to your school’s VLE so that students can download and type directly onto a digital copy. Excellent for revision.
If Thou Must Love Me (Elizabeth Barrett Browning) - comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

If Thou Must Love Me (Elizabeth Barrett Browning) - comprehension questions

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These comprehension questions were designed for MA-HA (I)GCSE students studying Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s poem “If Thou Must Love Me”. They could be used in groups or alone in class, or as homework. They would also be good as a revision activity or if you need cover work. The questions could also be split up and used in class using a carousel format. Extension questions are included, especially regarding the poem’s form, and contextual knowledge surrounding the poet’s husband, Robert Browning. Two copies of the questions are included per sheet of paper to ease printing, photocopying and distribution.
The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) - comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) - comprehension questions

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These comprehension questions were designed for use by MA-HA (I)GCSE students reading Edith Wharton’s short story “The Moving Finger”. These questions could be completed all in one go after reading the whole story (perhaps as homework) or could be completed after reading each part (maybe as a class activity). The questions encourage students to consider how characters are developed and evolve, as well as their overall significance to the story, using evidence from the text to support their ideas. As such these could also be used as stimuli for essays or presentations (as opposed to short answers). The final question could be done as an extension activity in writing and/or the quotation given to all students as a starter or plenary activity.
Idioms
AngelilAngelil

Idioms

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This activity has 3 separate parts. After eliciting a class definition of idioms from students, the worksheet requires them to match idioms with their true meanings. Interesting discussion could follow, not just to correct the answers, but to explain how they knew/guessed if they were unsure. Students can then write sentences using the idioms before developing their ideas into a story (more than one idiom could be used in the story - e.g. through dialogue - or one idiom could be developed more thoroughly into a narrative). This was originally made to use with KS3 but could also be used with able KS2s.
Descriptive writing PPT based on Curious Incident
AngelilAngelil

Descriptive writing PPT based on Curious Incident

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This resource is a great introduction to descriptive writing for students in Years 8-9. It uses Mark Haddon’s “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” as a stimulus but you could adapt this to suit any text where the character finds a journey difficult. The PPT should get you through a minimum of 2 lessons depending on your students’ abilities. It goes through the basics of getting students to name the five senses and to talk about journeys they have completed, before progressing to finding textual evidence for why Christopher finds his journey to London difficult and planning/creating their own piece of descriptive writing based on a journey. Opportunities for peer assessment are also included.
Full unit plan: Stories of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Stories of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit explores a prescribed selection of stories from volume 2 of Songs of Ourselves, as determined by Cambridge International Examinations. It helps students to analyse a variety of texts, techniques and historical and cultural contexts via a number of different media. Their studies will culminate in the production of a critical essay in line with CIE's requirements for official coursework. This unit was designed for students working towards CIE's IGCSE in World Literature, but could also be used for pupils (at GCSE, IGCSE, A Level, IB...) studying any of the short stories listed below: The Yellow Wallpaper (Charlotte Perkins Gilman) The Contest (Annie Proulx) On Her Knees (Tim Winton) Her First Ball (Katherine Mansfield) A Horse and Two Goats (RK Narayan) The Bath (Janet Frame) Journey (Shirley Geok-Lin Lim) The Third and Final Continent (Jhumpa Lahiri) The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) The Open Boat (Stephen Crane)