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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.

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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.
WW1 letters comprehension/analysis activities
AngelilAngelil

WW1 letters comprehension/analysis activities

(0)
This resource collates multiple WW1 letters from an American soldier, deployed in France, to his father back home in the US. The ensuing activities check on students’ comprehension of vocabulary and ask them to analyse the context, audience, purpose, and stylistic elements of the text. Best for students with some confidence at doing this already but could be adapted for weaker students or students who are only just starting to develop these skills. If using the final analysis-writing activity this could easily stretch to 2-3 lessons depending on the amount of groundwork you need to lay with your students beforehand. An alternative approach could be, for instance, to carousel the reading and analysis of letters so that e.g. a small group just works with one letter.
Possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour (sc 1)
AngelilAngelil

Possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour (sc 1)

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This revision sheet lists possible reasons for Blanche's behaviour in scene 1 of A Streetcar Named Desire. Underneath are spaces for students to write in evidence from the scene supporting each point. This could therefore be used not just for revision but also as a scaffold for weaker students&' essay-writing.
Christmas advertisements
AngelilAngelil

Christmas advertisements

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These Christmas ads can be stuck to the wall so that your students can react to them in relation to context, audience, purpose and style. If laminated on first printing they can be used for years to come. Students can annotate using Post-It notes. If you are in a rush, then just print them and have students write on them directly. Colour printing is highly recommended. These posters are mainly of use to A-Level/IB students, but could also be used for (I)GCSE language and media courses. Note: one of the posters is appropriate for 16+ only.
'Parlez-vous français?' (by Dave Barry) + comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

'Parlez-vous français?' (by Dave Barry) + comprehension questions

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This column by Dave Barry can be used by secondary English students to understand cultural context, as well as how humour is created and used in writing. It can also be used by French classes for a tongue-in-cheek insight into French culture. The comprehension questions are as follows: How far does Dave Barry exaggerate? Is some of what he says true? Explain your answer. Give an example of how Dave Barry uses language in a humorous way. EXTENSION: What technique(s) does he use and why? Dave Barry also makes fun of Americans. How?
The Great Gatsby 4-week unit plan - NEW AND IMPROVED!
AngelilAngelil

The Great Gatsby 4-week unit plan - NEW AND IMPROVED!

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This unit plan for The Great Gatsby is aimed at students aged 14+. While many ideas will suit abler students more, it is ultimately made accessible to all with differentiation suggestions included. The unit should take around 4 weeks to complete (based on the idea of 4 x 55-minute lessons per week), but this may vary depending on your class' ability. Also included is an extension task regarding the reference to the 'Platonic conception of himself'.
The Sorrow of War: quotes quiz
AngelilAngelil

The Sorrow of War: quotes quiz

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This quotes quiz was created for students revising Bao Ninh’s novel “The Sorrow of War” for their final exams. No answers are provided as the emphasis is on the quality of student analysis. Techniques-wise it tests student knowledge of literary and linguistic devices including personification, simile and metaphor, and alliteration. Aimed at MA-HA sixth-formers.
Analysing language and its effects (Bao Ninh's "The Sorrow of War")
AngelilAngelil

Analysing language and its effects (Bao Ninh's "The Sorrow of War")

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This resource consists of anonymised quotations from real sixth-form student essays about Bao Ninh’s language use in the opening pages of “The Sorrow of War”. By asking students to identify what is good about them and what could be improved, it is possible to not only develop their justifications/opinions of these aspects of the novel itself, but also to allow students to critique the quality of the analysis. This helps to develop metacognitive and essay-writing skills as well as knowledge of the text. As such, it can be used with students who have no experience of the novel, as well as with students who are studying the novel directly. It would make a great starter/plenary activity, especially in the context of revision of the novel or essay-writing classes.
The Border-Builder (Rumens) - comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

The Border-Builder (Rumens) - comprehension questions

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These comprehension questions were designed to support student learning when studying the Rumens poem “The Border-Builder”. They could be completed in class (in groups or alone), or set as homework. They are aimed at MA-HA (I)GCSE students and come with an optional extra credit assignment for extension purposes. Multiple copies of the questions are printed on one page to aid printing, photocopying and distribution.
Comprehension questions Le Grand Meaulnes/The Lost Estate (Chapters 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 8)
AngelilAngelil

Comprehension questions Le Grand Meaulnes/The Lost Estate (Chapters 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 8)

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These comprehension questions can be completed by students in groups or on their own, in class or as homework. They are also great revision resources and can be handy if you need to set cover work. Multiple copies of the questions are duplicated on one sheet in some cases, for ease of printing, photocopying, and distribution. The questions are designed for MA-HA students and range from identification and interpretation of techniques used (such as paradox) to encouraging students to explore issues surrounding translation, narratorial reliability, and choices of nomenclature in the novel. Motif and symbolism are also covered. Some extension tasks are included. These questions were originally developed for use by KS4 students working towards their IGCSE in World Literature. They could also be used for native French speakers, or students of IB/A Level French (although they would of course need to be translated).
Literary and linguistic techniques matching game
AngelilAngelil

Literary and linguistic techniques matching game

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This literary and linguistic techniques matching game could be printed, laminated and cut out so that students can use it kinaesthetically (which is how I used it) or distributed as a worksheet where students just draw lines between the terms and their definitions (but you would need to mix up the definitions in the document first!). It was designed for IGCSE students but could be used throughout secondary depending on your students’ abilities. It includes literary devices such as flashbacks, as well as linguistic devices such as complex sentences. Great as a starter or plenary activity, or for revision.
Classical characters in Translations (Brian Friel)
AngelilAngelil

Classical characters in Translations (Brian Friel)

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This worksheet/activity is designed for MA-HA A Level/IB English A students. It provides the references made in the play to characters from classical literature/mythology, in the order in which they are mentioned in the play, so is a great resource for revision. Students can work in class or at home to locate the quotation where the character is mentioned (if they put act/scene numbers this helps their essay-writing/referencing skills generally). Students are then encouraged to explain the significance of this being included (this column in the chart could be an extension task for those of higher ability, or all students could be asked to do it). Prompts are included to help students with the explanation/aid differentation.
Full unit plan: Stories of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Stories of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit explores a prescribed selection of stories from volume 2 of Songs of Ourselves, as determined by Cambridge International Examinations. It helps students to analyse a variety of texts, techniques and historical and cultural contexts via a number of different media. Their studies will culminate in the production of a critical essay in line with CIE's requirements for official coursework. This unit was designed for students working towards CIE's IGCSE in World Literature, but could also be used for pupils (at GCSE, IGCSE, A Level, IB...) studying any of the short stories listed below: The Yellow Wallpaper (Charlotte Perkins Gilman) The Contest (Annie Proulx) On Her Knees (Tim Winton) Her First Ball (Katherine Mansfield) A Horse and Two Goats (RK Narayan) The Bath (Janet Frame) Journey (Shirley Geok-Lin Lim) The Third and Final Continent (Jhumpa Lahiri) The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) The Open Boat (Stephen Crane)
Authorial and narratorial reliability: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)
AngelilAngelil

Authorial and narratorial reliability: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)

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This grid is intended to encourage sixth-formers studying the novel “The Sorrow of War” to consider the reliability of both its author (Bao Ninh) and protagonist (Kien), as well as areas where the two intersect. This is also a chance to develop their abilities in terms of supporting their ideas with evidence from the text. Aimed at MA-HA students. Examples could be filled in by the teacher (maybe one per box) along with possible sentence stems for explanation to support lower-ability students. The resource could also be adapted for use with any other text that has an unreliable narrator and/or author.
Full unit plan: Hedda Gabler (Henrik Ibsen)
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Hedda Gabler (Henrik Ibsen)

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit plan for Henrik Ibsen's play, Hedda Gabler, explores characterisation, setting, themes, techniques, and text-to-self connections, as well as theatrical movements and practitioners and the influence of these on the play, and is enhanced by the contrasting cultures of production and reception via study of historical context. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. They devise their own adaptation of the play to form a 1-hour staged reading of the production.
Unit: Romeo and Juliet (7 weeks)
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Unit: Romeo and Juliet (7 weeks)

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This 28-lesson (7-week) unit plan explores Shakespeare's classic tragedy, Romeo and Juliet, via examination of several of the playwright's specialist structures, including the sonnet form, rhythm, rhyme and meter, as well as techniques common to several types of literature, including antithesis, hyperbole, and juxtaposition. An effort is made in the unit to encourage text-to-self, text-to-world, and text-to-text connections in the pupils' readings. Contextual information is introduced as and when it is relevant, as opposed to systematically. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose.
Moods and atmospheres in Le Grand Meaulnes/The Lost Estate
AngelilAngelil

Moods and atmospheres in Le Grand Meaulnes/The Lost Estate

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This table is designed to be filled in by students to illustrate the moods and atmospheres in the novel, with techniques identified and effects explained, as well as examples given from the text (paraphrase or direct quote). The various columns could be used to differentiate between the abilities of different groups of students, or filled in by all students. The final question on the sheet could be used as extension or plenary. This was designed to be used by students of IGCSE World Literature, who were reading the novel in translation, but it could also be used by native French speakers, or by students of A Level/IB French.
Identify and evaluate knowledge claims
AngelilAngelil

Identify and evaluate knowledge claims

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This resource is great for KS4/KS5 Critical Thinking, Global Perspectives, TOK, or any similar courses. Students firstly have to identify knowledge claims on the sheet, as well as the grammatical particle that allows them to do so. They are then asked to assess how far they believe certain knowledge claims to be true. All of these activities could be done in groups or alone. The final statement on the sheet could be detached from the rest and used as a plenary activity, or as extension.
Statement-question-response grid: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)
AngelilAngelil

Statement-question-response grid: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)

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The statements and questions in this grid about Bao Ninh’s novel “The Sorrow of War” were provided by real sixth-form students, with development in the brackets being provided by me. The third column in the chart is left blank so that your students can fill in their own responses to the ideas. It may be prudent to print this on A3 paper so that students have sufficient space to write, and/or upload a copy to your school’s VLE so that students can download and type directly onto a digital copy. Excellent for revision.
Character impressions: Translations (Brian Friel)
AngelilAngelil

Character impressions: Translations (Brian Friel)

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This worksheet/activity is great for revision, and can be filled out as students encounter characters upon first reading/throughout their initial reading of the play, or completed retrospectively. It has been filled in with the names of characters from Brian Friel’s play “Translations” but could be easily adapted/used for other plays. Students are encouraged to make notes on multiple features including the characters’ attitudes, impact on them as readers, and how the characters speak. I usually print one copy of this out on A4 and then blow it up to A3 size to give students more space to write. It can also be uploaded to your school’s VLE so that students can download extra copies if they need it (or if they prefer to type onto a digital copy).
The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe) quotes quiz WITH ANSWERS
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The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe) quotes quiz WITH ANSWERS

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This quiz is designed for pupils studying Christopher Marlowe’s play “The Jew of Malta” (KS4/5). Students are asked to explain who spoke the line, roughly where it appears in the play, and its overall significance, as well as any techniques used by Marlowe (where appropriate). It was designed for my students as a closed-book quiz but you could of course run it as an open-book quiz. The answers indicate who spoke the line as well as exactly when in the play. In terms of significance no notes are made as multiple interpretations are possible and the emphasis is on rewarding the quality of student answers rather than exact content. Students could self-assess with you going through the answers in a whole-class setting; they could peer-assess; or you could take in the quizzes for you to mark them in a more detailed manner.