Hero image

Angelil's Shop

Average Rating3.33
(based on 49 reviews)

I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.

74Uploads

63k+Views

40k+Downloads

I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.
WW1 letters comprehension/analysis activities
AngelilAngelil

WW1 letters comprehension/analysis activities

(0)
This resource collates multiple WW1 letters from an American soldier, deployed in France, to his father back home in the US. The ensuing activities check on students’ comprehension of vocabulary and ask them to analyse the context, audience, purpose, and stylistic elements of the text. Best for students with some confidence at doing this already but could be adapted for weaker students or students who are only just starting to develop these skills. If using the final analysis-writing activity this could easily stretch to 2-3 lessons depending on the amount of groundwork you need to lay with your students beforehand. An alternative approach could be, for instance, to carousel the reading and analysis of letters so that e.g. a small group just works with one letter.
Text types revision PPT
AngelilAngelil

Text types revision PPT

(0)
This Powerpoint is most suitable for IB Diploma (Language A) or A Level language and literature students looking to revise text types. The Powerpoint covers the features of the following text types, as well as things that students can look for/consider when analysing an unseen text of this type: News article Editorial Blog or diary entry Political cartoons Graphic novels Brochures and leaflets Forum posts Academic journal articles Reviews Speeches and talks Tweets Letters and emails Interviews Advertisements Infographics The resource also covers reminders of the purposes of writing, the differences between literary and linguistic features, and further tips to enhance performance in analytical tasks of this nature (e.g. commenting on context, planning skills). This is not intended to serve as a full lesson in itself but could potentially be developed by teachers to create one according to the needs of their class. It’s perhaps more appropriate as a revision resource to be distributed for students’ own independent learning.
The Sound of Waves - key quotes and ideas
AngelilAngelil

The Sound of Waves - key quotes and ideas

(1)
These notes on The Sound of Waves list potentially useful quotations from each chapter through the themes of innocence and experience (I have taught this text once privately and my student’s essay was based on this idea, so I read and made notes on the text with a view to helping her with this). Using the prism of these universal themes enables connections to be made between other curriculum texts, such as the poetry of William Blake and the plays of William Shakespeare. The notes are aimed at teachers (rather than students) and do not constitute full lesson plans in themselves but serve to provide inspiration for lessons depending on what skills and topics you hope to teach when instructing students on the novel. They provide opportunities to help students understand the effects of techniques such as simile and metaphor, foreshadowing, personification, pathetic fallacy, and symbolism. The notes also make links to critical thinking courses such as TOK (Theory of Knowledge) so can also be used by IB teachers to facilitate links to the Diploma core. Obviously all ideas presented in the notes are interpretations which you may agree or disagree with. Nonetheless, I hope they help!
Spoken language (case study: David Attenborough/TV documentary voiceovers) PPT
AngelilAngelil

Spoken language (case study: David Attenborough/TV documentary voiceovers) PPT

(0)
This PPT presentation/lesson encourages students to consider the differences between the way people speak in normal life vs how they speak on television documentaries. The starting question could be explored in a whole-class discussion or via various Kagan Strategies (e.g. Think-Pair-Share), and the resultant ideas revisited later on. An excerpt from a David Attenborough documentary (about the lyre bird) is transcribed onto the PPT for a student to read aloud in their normal voice. Students then watch the corresponding video clip (linked to in the PPT, or can be found on Youtube/supplied on request if there are problems with this). They should then compare how the student read it with how the text is spoken by Attenborough. They may wish to consider elements such as accent, pace and enunciation. Reference to the initial ideas generated by students is encouraged. The speech features terminology table (or a version of it adapted for your students) can be used optionally to help. I recommend using relevant exercises from the CGP GCSE English workbook as a plenary activity. This lesson was conceived of for students entering KS5 but is also suitable for KS4.
The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe) quotes quiz WITH ANSWERS
AngelilAngelil

The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe) quotes quiz WITH ANSWERS

(0)
This quiz is designed for pupils studying Christopher Marlowe’s play “The Jew of Malta” (KS4/5). Students are asked to explain who spoke the line, roughly where it appears in the play, and its overall significance, as well as any techniques used by Marlowe (where appropriate). It was designed for my students as a closed-book quiz but you could of course run it as an open-book quiz. The answers indicate who spoke the line as well as exactly when in the play. In terms of significance no notes are made as multiple interpretations are possible and the emphasis is on rewarding the quality of student answers rather than exact content. Students could self-assess with you going through the answers in a whole-class setting; they could peer-assess; or you could take in the quizzes for you to mark them in a more detailed manner.
The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe) - questions - Act 5, scene 1
AngelilAngelil

The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe) - questions - Act 5, scene 1

(0)
The questions in this file are replicated multiple times to ease printing, photocopying and distribution. They deal with affirmations made by Barabas and Ferneze in this scene and require students to justify their answers with evidence from Act 5 scene 1, as well as from elsewhere in the play where appropriate. Students could be given one or both questions either to respond to with short answers or to expand/develop into an essay.
The Jew of Malta film: guiding questions
AngelilAngelil

The Jew of Malta film: guiding questions

(0)
This list of questions is intended for students studying Christopher Marlowe’s play “The Jew of Malta”. The questions can be given to students before or after watching the Grandfather Films production of the play, with the understanding either way that they make notes throughout their viewing of the film. The questions include topics such as possible cuts that could be made, the chronology of the film, and the casting. The questions could therefore be used by students of English, Drama, or Film Studies. There are three copies of the questions per page, for ease of printing, photocopying and distribution.
Fact sheet: Machiavelli
AngelilAngelil

Fact sheet: Machiavelli

(0)
This resource was designed for students studying Christopher Marlowe’s play The Jew of Malta, but it could equally be of use to teachers and students of History or Politics, as well as English and Drama. It consists of a brief overview of Machiavelli’s life and work, with 3 copies per page to ease printing, photocopying and distribution.
Character impressions grid: The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe)
AngelilAngelil

Character impressions grid: The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe)

(0)
This character impressions grid can be used by students throughout their study of Christopher Marlowe’s play “The Jew of Malta”, or completed at the end of the unit as a revision activity. It covers key points for students to make notes upon, including attitudes, how characters speak, and the impact of characters upon the audience. It is advisable to print/photocopy on A3 to give students maximum space to write. Alternatively, it can be uploaded directly to your school’s VLE so students can make their notes directly onto a digital copy.
Bellamira PPT - The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe)
AngelilAngelil

Bellamira PPT - The Jew of Malta (Christopher Marlowe)

(0)
This PPT is designed to introduce students to the character of Bellamira in Marlowe’s play The Jew of Malta, starting with an image suggesting a modern prostitute as a stimulus for discussion. (Possible questions for students could be who they think this represents in the play - if you have asked them to read ahead - or what character traits or jobs are suggested by the image.) The focus then shifts to scenes 1 and 2 of Act 3 of the play. Again these could be read together in class, or something you have asked students to read alone before the lesson takes place. Student ideas are invited as to whether the scenes are comic or tragic. These could be elicited in any way you wish. The final slides invite students to direct one of the scenes from either a comic or tragic perspective, considering lighting etc. As such this lesson is suitable for English or Drama. It was initially designed for KS5 but could easily be used for KS4 as well.
Statement-question-response grid: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)
AngelilAngelil

Statement-question-response grid: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)

(0)
The statements and questions in this grid about Bao Ninh’s novel “The Sorrow of War” were provided by real sixth-form students, with development in the brackets being provided by me. The third column in the chart is left blank so that your students can fill in their own responses to the ideas. It may be prudent to print this on A3 paper so that students have sufficient space to write, and/or upload a copy to your school’s VLE so that students can download and type directly onto a digital copy. Excellent for revision.
The Sorrow of War: quotes quiz
AngelilAngelil

The Sorrow of War: quotes quiz

(0)
This quotes quiz was created for students revising Bao Ninh’s novel “The Sorrow of War” for their final exams. No answers are provided as the emphasis is on the quality of student analysis. Techniques-wise it tests student knowledge of literary and linguistic devices including personification, simile and metaphor, and alliteration. Aimed at MA-HA sixth-formers.
Authorial and narratorial reliability: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)
AngelilAngelil

Authorial and narratorial reliability: The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh)

(0)
This grid is intended to encourage sixth-formers studying the novel “The Sorrow of War” to consider the reliability of both its author (Bao Ninh) and protagonist (Kien), as well as areas where the two intersect. This is also a chance to develop their abilities in terms of supporting their ideas with evidence from the text. Aimed at MA-HA students. Examples could be filled in by the teacher (maybe one per box) along with possible sentence stems for explanation to support lower-ability students. The resource could also be adapted for use with any other text that has an unreliable narrator and/or author.
Analysing language and its effects (Bao Ninh's "The Sorrow of War")
AngelilAngelil

Analysing language and its effects (Bao Ninh's "The Sorrow of War")

(0)
This resource consists of anonymised quotations from real sixth-form student essays about Bao Ninh’s language use in the opening pages of “The Sorrow of War”. By asking students to identify what is good about them and what could be improved, it is possible to not only develop their justifications/opinions of these aspects of the novel itself, but also to allow students to critique the quality of the analysis. This helps to develop metacognitive and essay-writing skills as well as knowledge of the text. As such, it can be used with students who have no experience of the novel, as well as with students who are studying the novel directly. It would make a great starter/plenary activity, especially in the context of revision of the novel or essay-writing classes.
Forms of abandonment in "The Sorrow of War" - PEE grid
AngelilAngelil

Forms of abandonment in "The Sorrow of War" - PEE grid

(0)
This point - evidence - explanation grid was designed for students of Bao Ninh’s novel “The Sorrow of War”. Students are given page numbers to help with the activity. Unfortunately both the “red edition” and “black edition” are published by Vintage so it is difficult to be more specific about this on the worksheet. Students should use the page numbers given to identify forms of abandonment, before then adding a quotation and page number to go with it. They then have to explain the importance of their chosen example. This is best done in groups as otherwise students can get bogged down by the scale of the task. It is therefore aimed at MA-HA A Level/IB students, with a further extension activity included for your most able.
Republic of Ireland context/history quiz
AngelilAngelil

Republic of Ireland context/history quiz

(0)
This quiz was designed to be used in an English lesson to reinforce student knowledge of Irish history in relation to Brian Friel’s play “Translations”. However, it could of course also be used by history teachers! The quiz could be done traditionally, whereby students revise in advance and then sit the quiz on their own. However, I used it as a team game, whereby at around Easter time, the slips were cut up and hidden around the classroom treasure hunt-style. Students had to work in teams to find the slips and fill in the answers where they thought they went on the answer sheet. The first team to get a full sheet of correct answers - or the highest number of correct answers - by the end of the given time - won an Easter egg (I appreciate that edible prizes and/or the religious aspect won’t work in all schools so obviously feel free to substitute this with a reward of your choosing if needed). Ground rules worth setting include: no hoarding of slips in your team (they should be put back where you have found them so other teams can also find them…) and no using chairs/tables etc as weaponry to guard the slips you have found (yes, really!!).
Fact sheet: IRA (Irish Republican Army)
AngelilAngelil

Fact sheet: IRA (Irish Republican Army)

(0)
This is a fact sheet about the IRA designed to be distributed to students, or for teachers to use to give them some background knowledge. It has been adapted/created based on Wikipedia so naturally is basic/has limitations, but is suitable for student use and for teachers who are not history specialists. It can be useful for English teachers who are teaching plays or novels where this history is relevant, such as Brian Friel’s “Translations” or Joan Lingard’s “Across The Barricades”.
Character impressions: Translations (Brian Friel)
AngelilAngelil

Character impressions: Translations (Brian Friel)

(0)
This worksheet/activity is great for revision, and can be filled out as students encounter characters upon first reading/throughout their initial reading of the play, or completed retrospectively. It has been filled in with the names of characters from Brian Friel’s play “Translations” but could be easily adapted/used for other plays. Students are encouraged to make notes on multiple features including the characters’ attitudes, impact on them as readers, and how the characters speak. I usually print one copy of this out on A4 and then blow it up to A3 size to give students more space to write. It can also be uploaded to your school’s VLE so that students can download extra copies if they need it (or if they prefer to type onto a digital copy).
Classical characters in Translations (Brian Friel)
AngelilAngelil

Classical characters in Translations (Brian Friel)

(0)
This worksheet/activity is designed for MA-HA A Level/IB English A students. It provides the references made in the play to characters from classical literature/mythology, in the order in which they are mentioned in the play, so is a great resource for revision. Students can work in class or at home to locate the quotation where the character is mentioned (if they put act/scene numbers this helps their essay-writing/referencing skills generally). Students are then encouraged to explain the significance of this being included (this column in the chart could be an extension task for those of higher ability, or all students could be asked to do it). Prompts are included to help students with the explanation/aid differentation.
Rhapsody on a Windy Night (TS Eliot) - technique + quotation matching game
AngelilAngelil

Rhapsody on a Windy Night (TS Eliot) - technique + quotation matching game

(0)
This resource is designed to be printed and laminated so that students can match techniques and quotations from TS Eliot’s poem “Rhapsody on a Windy Night”. It was designed for IB Diploma Programme English Language & Literature students (so KS5) but could be used with able KS4 students too. After completing the activity students can be given a non-laminated version of the file to keep (all techniques are aligned with the correct answers). Techniques covered include anaphora, personification, themes, and iambic rhythm. Great as a starter or main activity.