Hero image

Paperfriendlyresources's Shop

Follow paper friendly resources on instagram: Paperfriendlyresourcesuk These resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com

280Uploads

131k+Views

70k+Downloads

Follow paper friendly resources on instagram: Paperfriendlyresourcesuk These resources have been designed to ensure good quality teaching is not compromised by printing restrictions or buffering videos. Lessons that include worksheets have been created for teachers to print at least two copies to an A4 sheet. For general enquiries or support please email: Paperfriendlyresources@gmail.com
AQA new specification-The human population explosion-B18.1
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-The human population explosion-B18.1

(0)
The human population explosion lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Students are expected to demonstrate their graph skills this lesson as well as interpret data. This lesson Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, questions with markscheme and embedded video’s and mini review. ***Paper friendly tips: Avoid printing the markscheme provided, unless required, an interactive markscheme has been included in the powerpoint. Print two worksheets to one page to save paper. Instruct able students to copy out the table on slide 14 . NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. * AQA spec link: 4.7.3.1; 3.2; 3.3 Relevant chapter: B18 Biodiversity and ecosystems. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 286-287 Students are required to know the following; Biodiversity is the variety of all the different species of organisms on earth, or within an ecosystem. A great biodiversity ensures the stability of ecosystems due to the interdependencies of one species on another for food, shelter, and the maintenance of the physical environment. The future of the human species on Earth relies on us maintaining a good level of biodiversity. Many human activities are reducing biodiversity and only recently have measures been taken to try to stop this reduction. Rapid growth in the human population and an increase in the standard of living mean that increasingly more resources are used and more waste is produced. Unless waste and chemical materials are properly handled, more pollution will be caused. Humans reduce the amount of land available for other animals and plants by building, quarrying, farming, and dumping waste.
AQA new specification-B15 Genetics and evolution-Separate science bundle
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-B15 Genetics and evolution-Separate science bundle

10 Resources
This bundle contains the content for SEPARATE science students. It includes the B15 unit-Genetics and evolution. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 30% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 10 lessons Lesson 1-History of genetics Lesson 2-Theories of evolution Lesson 3-Accepting Darwin’s ideas Lesson 4-Evolution and speciation Lesson 5-Evidence for evolution Lesson 6-Fossils and extinction Lesson 7-More about extinction Lesson 8-Antibiotic resistant bacteria Lesson 9-Classification Lesson 10-New systems of classification Good luck with your lessons :)
AQA new specification-Evolution and speciation-B15.4
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-Evolution and speciation-B15.4

(1)
Evolution and speciation lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.3.2 Relevant chapter: B15 Genetics and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 240-241 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to: • describe the work of Darwin and Wallace in the development of the theory of evolution by natural selection • explain the impact of these ideas on biology. Alfred Russel Wallace independently proposed the theory of evolution by natural selection. He published joint writings with Darwin in 1858 which prompted Darwin to publish On the Origin of Species (1859) the following year. Wallace worked worldwide gathering evidence for evolutionary theory. He is best known for his work on warning colouration in animals and his theory of speciation. Alfred Wallace did much pioneering work on speciation but more evidence over time has led to our current understanding of the theory of speciation. Students should be able to describe the steps which give rise to new species. WS 1.1 The theory of speciation has developed over time
AQA new specification-Accepting Darwin's ideas-B15.3
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-Accepting Darwin's ideas-B15.3

(0)
Accepting Darwin’s ideas lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. **Please note the homework and markscheme from the lesson on theories of evolution (B15.2) has also been included in this resource. ** AQA spec link: 4.6.3.1 Relevant chapter: B15 Genetics and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 238-239 Students are required to know the following; Darwin published his ideas in On the Origin of Species (1859). There was much controversy surrounding these revolutionary new ideas. The theory of evolution by natural selection was only gradually accepted because: • the theory challenged the idea that God made all the animals and plants that live on Earth • there was insufficient evidence at the time the theory was published to convince many scientists • the mechanism of inheritance and variation was not known until 50 years after the theory was published.
AQA new specification-Theories of evolution-B15.2
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-Theories of evolution-B15.2

(0)
Theories of evolution lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.3.1 Relevant chapter: B15 Genetics and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 236-237 Students are required to know the following; Charles Darwin, largely as a result of observations on a round the world expedition, linked to developing knowledge of geology and fossils, proposed the theory of natural selection: • Individual organisms within a particular species show a wide range of variation for a characteristic. • Individuals with characteristics most suited to the environment are more likely to survive to breed successfully. • The characteristics that have enabled these individuals to survive are then passed on to the next generation. Other theories, including that of Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, are based mainly on the idea that changes that occur in an organism during its lifetime can be inherited. We now know that in the vast majority of cases this type of inheritance cannot occur. A study of creationism is not required.
AQA new specification-The history of genetics-B15.1
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-The history of genetics-B15.1

(0)
The history of genetics lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. AQA spec link: 4.6.3.3 Relevant chapter: B15 Genetics and evolution. AQA Biology trilogy edition textbook-Page 234-235 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to: • describe the development of our understanding of genetics including the work of Mendel • understand why the importance of Mendel’s discovery was not recognised until after his death. In the mid-19th century Gregor Mendel carried out breeding experiments on plants. One of his observations was that the inheritance of each characteristic is determined by ‘units’ that are passed on to descendants unchanged. In the late 19th century behaviour of chromosomes during cell division was observed. WS 1.1 Our current understanding of genetics has developed over time. In the early 20th century it was observed that chromosomes and Mendel’s ‘units’ behaved in similar ways. This led to the idea that the ‘units’, now called genes, were located on chromosomes. In the mid-20th century the structure of DNA was determined and the mechanism of gene function worked out. This scientific work by many scientists led to the gene theory being developed.
AQA new specification-B14 Variation and evolution-Separate science bundle
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-B14 Variation and evolution-Separate science bundle

7 Resources
This bundle contains the content for SEPARATE/BIOLOGY ONLY students. It includes the B14 unit-Variation and evolution. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 10% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 7 lessons Lesson 1-Variation Lesson 2-Evolution by natural selection Lesson 3-Selective breeding Lesson 4-Genetic engineering Lesson 5-Cloning Lesson 6-Adult cell cloning Lesson 7-Ethics of genetic technologies Good luck with your lessons :)
AQA new specification-Adult cell cloning B14.6
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-Adult cell cloning B14.6

(0)
Adult cell cloning lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: embedded videos and timers, slide animations, practice questions with answers on slides, worksheet and an interactive quiz. NB: If you are unable to play videos a URL link can be found in the slide notes. NB: This lesson is for SEPARATE science ONLY AQA spec link: 4.6.2.5 Relevant chapter: B14 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 228-229. Students are required to know the following; Adult cell cloning: • The nucleus is removed from an unfertilised egg cell. • The nucleus from an adult body cell, such as a skin cell, is inserted into the egg cell. • An electric shock stimulates the egg cell to divide to form an embryo. • These embryo cells contain the same genetic information as the adult skin cell. • When the embryo has developed into a ball of cells, it is inserted into the womb of an adult female to continue its development. WS 1.3, 1.4 Explain the potential benefits and risks of cloning in agriculture and in medicine and that some people have ethical objections. There are links with this content to Advantages and disadvantages of sexual and asexual reproduction (biology only) and Selective breeding.
AQA new specification-Cloning B14.5
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-Cloning B14.5

(0)
Cloning lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for higher ability separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: questions, slide timers, slide animations, interactive answers on slides, worksheet and a plenary. *This lesson includes a practical which is not required. * NB: This lesson is for SEPARATE science ONLY AQA spec link: 4.6.2.5 Relevant chapter: B14 Variation and evolution. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 226-227. Students are required to know the following; Tissue culture: using small groups of cells from part of a plant to grow identical new plants. This is important for preserving rare plant species or commercially in nurseries. Cuttings: an older, but simple, method used by gardeners to produce many identical new plants from a parent plant. Embryo transplants: splitting apart cells from a developing animal embryo before they become specialised, then transplanting the identical embryos into host mothers. WS 1.3, 1.4 Explain the potential benefits and risks of cloning in agriculture and in medicine and that some people have ethical objections. There are links with this content to Advantages and disadvantages of sexual and asexual reproduction (biology only) and Selective breeding.
AQA new specification-B10 The human nervous system-Separate science bundle
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-B10 The human nervous system-Separate science bundle

8 Resources
This bundle contains the content for SEPARATE/BIOLOGY ONLY students. It includes the B10 unit-The human nervous system. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 20% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 7 lessons Lesson 1-Principles of homeostasis Lesson 2-The structure and function of the human nervous system Lesson 3-RP 6/7-Reaction time Lesson 4-Reflex actions Lesson 5-The brain Lesson 6-The eye Lesson 7-Common problems of the eye Good luck with your lessons :)
AQA new specification-Common problems of the eye-B10.6
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-Common problems of the eye-B10.6

(0)
Common problems of the eye lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability, separate science class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, homework worksheet, markscheme and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. THIS LESSON IS FOR BIOLOGY ONLY AQA spec link: 4.5.2.3 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 156-157 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to relate the structures of the eye to their functions. This includes: • accommodation to focus on near or distant objects Accommodation is the process of changing the shape of the lens to focus on near or distant objects. To focus on a near object: • the ciliary muscles contract • the suspensory ligaments loosen • the lens is then thicker and refracts light rays strongly. To focus on a distant object: • the ciliary muscles relax • the suspensory ligaments are pulled tight • the lens is then pulled thin and only slightly refracts light rays. Two common defects of the eyes are myopia (short sightedness) and hyperopia (long sightedness) in which rays of light do not focus on the retina. • Generally these defects are treated with spectacle lenses which refract the light rays so that they do focus on the retina. • New technologies now include hard and soft contact lenses, laser surgery to change the shape of the cornea, and a replacement lens in the eye. Students should be able to interpret ray diagrams, showing these two common defects of the eye and demonstrate how spectacle lenses correct them.
AQA new specification-B11.7-Extinction Homework
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-B11.7-Extinction Homework

(0)
An Internet-research based activity that allows students to explore the Wolly mammoth extinction theories. This resource allows students to apply their knowledge, if time allows it is also a fantastic way for students to present their findings to fellow classmates. Please leave a review on this resource.
AQA new specification-The eye-B10.5
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-The eye-B10.5

(0)
The eye lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability, separate science class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. THIS LESSON IS FOR BIOLOGY ONLY AQA spec link: 4.5.2.3 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 152-153 Students are required to know the following; Students should be able to relate the structures of the eye to their functions. This includes: • accommodation to focus on near or distant objects • adaptation to dim light. The eye is a sense organ containing receptors sensitive to light intensity and colour Students should be able to identify the following structures on a diagram of the eye and explain how their structure is related to their function: •retina • optic nerve • sclera • cornea • iris • ciliary muscles • suspensory ligaments.
AQA new specification-The brain-B10.4
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-The brain-B10.4

(0)
The brain lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability, separate science class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes powerpoint timers, slide animations, embedded video’s, worksheet and mini review. NB: If you are unable to play embedded videos please view slide notes for link. THIS LESSON IS FOR BIOLOGY ONLY AQA spec link: 4.5.2.2 Relevant chapter: B10 The human nervous system. AQA Biology Third edition textbook-Page 152-153 Students are required to know the following; The brain controls complex behaviour. It is made of billions of interconnected neurones and has different regions that carry out different functions. Students should be able to identify the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and medulla on a diagram of the brain, and describe their functions. (HT only) Students should be able to explain some of the difficulties of investigating brain function and treating brain damage and disease. (HT only) Neuroscientists have been able to map the regions of the brain to particular functions by studying patients with brain damage, electrically stimulating different parts of the brain and using MRI scanning techniques. The complexity and delicacy of the brain makes investigating and treating brain disorders very difficult.
AQA new specification-B5 Communicable diseases-Separate science bundle
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-B5 Communicable diseases-Separate science bundle

11 Resources
This bundle only contains the content for SEPARATE science (BIOLOGY ONLY) students. It includes the B5 unit-communicable diseases. All lessons have been done in accordance to the specification requirements. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 35% by purchasing this bundle :) Lesson 1-Heath and disease Lesson 2-Pathogens and disease Lesson 3-Growing bacteria in the lab Lesson 4-RP 2 Microbiology Lesson 5-Preventing bacterial growth Lesson 6-Preventing infections Lesson 7-Viral and bacterial diseases Lesson 8-Diseases caused by fungi and protist Lesson 9-Human defense responses Lesson 10-More about plant diseases Lesson 11-Plant defence responses
AQA new specification-Plant defence responses-B5.11
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-Plant defence responses-B5.11

(1)
NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson Plant defence responses lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions, answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.3.2 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 94-95. Students should be able to describe physical and chemical plant defence responses. Physical defence responses to resist invasion of microorganisms: • Cellulose cell walls. • Tough waxy cuticle on leaves. • Layers of dead cells around stems (bark on trees) which fall off. Chemical plant defence responses: • Antibacterial chemicals. • Poisons to deter herbivores. Mechanical adaptations: • Thorns and hairs deter animals. • Leaves which droop or curl when touched. • Mimicry to trick animals.
AQA new specification-More about plant diseases-B5.10
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-More about plant diseases-B5.10

(0)
NB: This is a BIOLOGY (SEPARATES) ONLY lesson More about plant diseases lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Includes: slide animations, embedded videos, differentiated questions, answers have also been included within the slides. This resource is NOT suitable for combined science students. AQA spec link: 4.3.3.1 Relevant chapter: B5-Communicable diseases . AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 92-93. Plant diseases can be detected by: • stunted growth • spots on leaves • areas of decay (rot) • growths • malformed stems or leaves • discolouration • the presence of pests. Identification can be made by: • reference to a gardening manual • taking infected plants to a laboratory to identify the pathogen • using testing kits that contain monoclonal antibodies. Plants can be infected by a range of viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens as well as by insects. Knowledge of plant diseases is restricted to tobacco mosaic virus as a viral disease, black spot as a fungal disease, and aphids as insects. Plants can be damaged by a range of ion deficiency conditions: • stunted growth caused by nitrate deficiency • chlorosis caused by magnesium deficiency. Knowledge of ions is limited to nitrate ions needed for protein synthesis and therefore growth and magnesium ions needed to make chlorophyll.
AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICALS 1-10-Separate science
PaperfriendlyresourcesPaperfriendlyresources

AQA new specification-REQUIRED PRACTICALS 1-10-Separate science

12 Resources
This bundle contains all 10 biology required practicals for SEPARATE science students plus a complimentary heart dissection practical lesson. All practicals apart from RP9 come with a full powerpoint, ready to deliver. All lessons have been designed in accordance to the specification requirements and have been pitched to a higher ability class. Videos have been embedded for ease of use, and printer friendly resources attached. Search the individual practical lessons for more information on the lesson content. Save 23% by purchasing this bundle :) Total = 11 lessons These lessons are suitable to teach combined science students however they do not need to do RP 2, 8 and 10. RP 1-Microscopy RP 2-Micrbiology RP 3-Osmosis RP 4-Food tests RP 5-Effect of pH on amylase enzyme RP 6-Photosynthesis RP 7-Reaction time RP 8-Germination RP 9-Field Investigations RP 10-Decay Heart dissection practical RP worksheets 1-10 Good luck with your lessons :)