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The History Academy

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Card Sort: Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme'?
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Card Sort: Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme'?

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This tried and tested card sort looks at the controversial topic of General Haig's leadership during the Battle of the Somme. Students are given two heading cards labelled 'Butcher of the Somme' and the 'Man who won the war.' However, depending upon how you decide to use them you could change them to 'evidence for and 'evidence against' as the document is in word. In addition to the headings cards, students are given 14 statements to sort through. These are based on the latest research on the topic. This activity is suitable for a wide range of learners and could be used as the basis of an assessment task or extended writing activity. Aims & Objectives Theme: Why was there a stalemate on the Western Front? Know: What tactics did General Haig use at the Battle of the Somme in 1916? Understand: Why did the Battle of the Somme end in a stalemate? Evaluate: Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe- What happened during the Battle of the Somme in 1916? Explain - Why did Haig's tactics fail to achieve a breakthrough? Analyse - How far was Haig's responsible for the failure to break through in 1916? Professional Knowledge For those of you who are new to the profession, this topic is controversial for a number of reasons. Firstly, the leadership of the British Army during the war is traditionally described by some historians as 'lions led by donkeys.' Please note that this interpretation first grew out a dissatisfaction with the Treaty of Versailles and the concept that the First World War would be the 'War to end all wars' in the 1930's. Clearly by then, many of the sacrifices appeared to have been in vain with the rise of Hitler and the threat of war. However, in the immediate aftermath of the First World War, Haig was seen as a hero. He was also the man who set up the Royal British Legion and began the first poppy appeal. Secondly, this topic is controversial for many of our Australian cousins whose sense of national identity grew out of their frustration and anger over the disaster at Gallipoli. This has led to feeling that the British tactics were a complete failure in all theatres of war and has led to the writing of some pretty bad popular history by Australian tour guides like John Laffin in his book ‘British Butchers and Bunglers of WW1' to almost justify the Republican Movement in Australia. History as always is controversial. Historians create a hierarchy of facts to suit their own interpretations. This exercise gets students to have a go at creating their own! I have also created a PowerPoint to accompany this topic, which can be downloaded separately or as part of a discounted package. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: What were the consequences of the Black Death?
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Diamond 9: What were the consequences of the Black Death?

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This outstanding diamond 9 activity has been designed specifically to help students develop their critical thinking skills whilst studying the consequences of the Black Death on Medieval Britain. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity, bit it is primarily designed to provide stretch and challenge for the more able. If you are looking for a main stream resource, then why not check out my card sort activity on this topic? It can be downloaded separately from my TES shop or as a bundle with this resource. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document which can be differentiated further if you wish. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a selection of ‘short’ and ‘long term’ consequences of the Black Death. Once students have cut the cards out, they are set three tasks including: Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. Sort the remaining diamonds to show which are ‘short’ or ‘long’ term consequences. Record and explain your reasons. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important consequences of the Black Death. Record and explain your reasons. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop not only their critical thinking skills but their understanding of the topic. Once stage 3 is complete. students could then have a go at writing an extended answer on 'what were the consequences of the Black Death? The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Medieval Society Know: What changed as a result of the Black Death? Understand: What were the long and short term consequences of the Black Death? Evaluate: Which consequences were more important? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What changed as a result of the Black Death? Explain: Which changes were short or long term consequences? Analyse: Which changes were more significant or important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. I’ve also designed a market place activity that works well alongside this resource. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Graphic Organisers
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Graphic Organisers

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These graphic organisers can be printed off as worksheets or used on your Interactive Whiteboard for a wide range of subjects and topics to help students analyse sources or compare and contrast ideas.
Card Sort: Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme'?
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Card Sort: Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme'?

(0)
This tried and tested card sort looks at the controversial topic of General Haig's leadership during the Battle of the Somme. Students are given two heading cards labelled 'Butcher of the Somme' and the 'Man who won the war.' However, depending upon how you decide to use them you could change them to 'evidence for and 'evidence against' as the document is in word. In addition to the headings cards, students are given 14 statements to sort through. These are based on the latest research on the topic. This activity is suitable for a wide range of learners and could be used as the basis of an assessment task or extended writing activity. Aims & Objectives Theme: Why was there a stalemate on the Western Front? Know: What tactics did General Haig use at the Battle of the Somme in 1916? Understand: Why did the Battle of the Somme end in a stalemate? Evaluate: Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe- What happened during the Battle of the Somme in 1916? Explain - Why did Haig's tactics fail to achieve a breakthrough? Analyse - How far was Haig's responsible for the failure to break through in 1916? Professional Knowledge For those of you who are new to the profession, this topic is controversial for a number of reasons. Firstly, the leadership of the British Army during the war is traditionally described by some historians as 'lions led by donkeys.' Please note that this interpretation first grew out a dissatisfaction with the Treaty of Versailles and the concept that the First World War would be the 'War to end all wars' in the 1930's. Clearly by then, many of the sacrifices appeared to have been in vain with the rise of Hitler and the threat of war. However, in the immediate aftermath of the First World War, Haig was seen as a hero. He was also the man who set up the Royal British Legion and began the first poppy appeal. Secondly, this topic is controversial for many of our Australian cousins whose sense of national identity grew out of their frustration and anger over the disaster at Gallipoli. This has led to feeling that the British tactics were a complete failure in all theatres of war and has led to the writing of some pretty bad popular history by Australian tour guides like John Laffin in his book ‘British Butchers and Bunglers of WW1' to almost justify the Republican Movement in Australia. History as always is controversial. Historians create a hierarchy of facts to suit their own interpretations. This exercise gets students to have a go at creating their own! I have also created a PowerPoint to accompany this topic, which can be downloaded separately or as part of a discounted package. Kind Regards Roy
Britain and the Slave Trade
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Britain and the Slave Trade

13 Resources
These outstanding resources look at Britain’s involvement in the Slave Trade and its abolition in 1807. They have been bundled together and heavily discounted in order to give your exception value. This topic is part of a statutory collection that all UK schools are required to teach. It contains several mature themes that have been approached in a sensitive and careful way. However, I would not recommend, teaching this topic to Year 7 students. When purchased you will be able to download eight lessons with enough work to keep a class going for a similar number of weeks or more, depending upon your curriculum time. Everything that has been included in this bundle has been written by experienced teachers and carefully crafted and differentiated so that they are suitable for the full ability range. For more detailed information, please click on each lesson and view the detailed previews that have been uploaded. If you like these resources then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: Why did Germany feel humilated by the Treaty of Versailles?
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Diamond 9: Why did Germany feel humilated by the Treaty of Versailles?

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This outstanding diamond 9 activity has been designed to provide stretch and challenge for students studying why Germany hated the Treaty of Versailles, 1919 . It can be used as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity. If you are looking for something more suitable for lower and middle ability then please check out my card sort matching exercise on this topic, which can be downloaded from my TES shop. This resource will easily work alongside any main steam textbook or resource on this topic. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors which describe the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919. The document is provided in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further by changing any of the key factors that I have included. Once students have cut out the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons why Germany hated the Treaty of Versailles. Record and explain the reasons for your choices. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their thinking skills as well as their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Treaty of Versailles Know: What were the terms of the Treaty of Versailles? Understand: What were the economic, political, territorial and military consequences for Germany? Evaluate: which of the terms would most Germans have found the most humiliating? Skills: Analysis, Evaluation, Discussion & Collaboration. WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919? Explain: The economic, political, territorial and military consequences of the treaty for Germany? Analyse: Which consequences or terms were the most humiliating for Germany? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: Why did Mussolini invade Abyssinia in 1935-36?
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Diamond 9: Why did Mussolini invade Abyssinia in 1935-36?

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This outstanding resource has been designed to provide stretch and challenge for students studying reasons why Italy invaded Abyssinia in 1935 -35. The key theory underpinning this strategy is that when we rank items, either statements, objects or images, we are required to make explicit the over- arching relationships by which we organise our knowledge and connect our learning. It can also be used as a starter, plenary, revision or as a focus for an assessment activity. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors which explain why Italy invaded Abyssinia in 1935 - 36. The document is provided in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further by changing any of the key factors that I have included. Once students have cut out the cards out they are set three tasks including: Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons to explain why Italy invaded Abyssinia in 1935 -36. Record and explain the reasons for your choices. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their thinking skills as well as their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did the League of Nations fail 1919 - 1939? Know: Why did Italy invade Abyssinia in 1935 - 36? Understand: How were these factors were linked to the weaknesses of the League? Evaluate: Which factors were the most important in Mussolini’s decision to invade? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Why Mussolini invaded Abyssinia? Explain: How these reasons were linked to the weaknesses of the League? Analyse: Which factors were the most important in Mussolini’s decision to invade? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The League of Nations 1919 - 1939
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The League of Nations 1919 - 1939

15 Resources
This bundle of resources represents great value for money as you are saving 25% on some outstanding, tried and tested resources that have been successful in helping students to suceed in this topic for over 25 years. Please click on each resource to find out more about its aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and whatis included when you purchase it. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: Causes of Britain's Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900
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Diamond 9: Causes of Britain's Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900

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This outstanding resource has been designed by experienced teachers to help develop students critical thinking skills whilst studying the causes of Britain’s Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900. It can be used with middle and upper ability students as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity. If you are looking for a resource to for the full ability spectrum, then why not check out my card sort on this topic, which can be downloaded from my TES shop. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors which explain Britain had an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? The document is provided in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further by changing any of the key factors that I have included. Once students have cut out the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons why Britain had an Industrial revolution 1750 - 1900. Record and explain the reasons for your choices. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their critical thinking skills as well as their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: How did Britain change from 1750 - 1900? Understand: Why did Britain have an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? Analyse: Which causes were the most important? Skills: Analysis, Evaluation, Discussion & Collaboration WILF: What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify and describe: How did Britain change 1750 - 1900? Explain: Why did Britain have an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? Analyse: begin to form a judgement in which causes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: Why did some women get the vote in 1918?
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Diamond 9: Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

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This diamond 9 activity has been designed to help students studying the why some women got the vote in 1918. It has been designed to be used with the full spectrum of leaners, but is particularly useful for stretching the critical thinking skills of the more able. If you are looking for a main stream resource, then please check out my card sort on this topic, which can be found in my TES shop. However, If you wish, you can also purchase both resources along with a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, starter, assessment and pupil mark scheme for an extra £1 , under the title: ‘Why did some women get the vote in 1918?’ When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document which can be differentiated further if you wish. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include one of the reasons why some women got the vote in 1918. Once students have cut the cards out, they are set three tasks including: Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. Sort the remaining diamonds to show which are ‘short’ or ‘long’ term consequences. Record and explain your reasons. 3… Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons why some women got the vote in 1918 and explain your reasons. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class to explain their choices. This is critical if you are going to develop the core thinking skills that we associate with a diamond 9 activity. Once students have sorted the cards, you can extend their understanding further by discussing which factor played the most important role in persuading politicians to change their mind and give some women the vote in 1918. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9 Activity: Hitler's Rise to Power
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Diamond 9 Activity: Hitler's Rise to Power

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This great thinking skills activity is designed to get your students discussing, prioritising and deciding which factors were the most important in helping to explain Hitler’s rise to power. The key theory underpinning this strategy is that when we rank items, either statements, objects or images, we are required to make explicit the over- arching relationships by which we organise our knowledge and connect our learning. If you are looking for a more traditional exercise then please check out my card sort matching exercise on this topic, which can be downloaded from my TES shop. This resource will easily work alongside any main steam textbook or resource on this topic. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors which explain Hitler’s rise to power. The document is provided in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further by changing any of the key factors that I have included. Once students have cut out the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons for Hitler’s rise to power that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the reaming diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using what you think are the four most important reasons for Hitler’s rise to power. Record and explain your reasons. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Germany 1919 - 1945 Know: What factors helped Hitler become a dictator? Understand: What factors are linked together? Evaluate: Which factors are more important Skills: Cause and Consequence WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The key stages to Hitler’s rise to power? Explain: Which factors are linked together? Analyse: Which were the most important reasons? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Market Place Activity: Adolf Hitler 1889 - 1933
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Market Place Activity: Adolf Hitler 1889 - 1933

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This great resource is designed to help students work cooperatively and research the key stages in Adolf Hitler's life from 1889 - 1933. This lesson makes a great observation lesson if you are trying to demonstrate collaborative learning. The PowerPoint includes information, content and sources that can be printed off on A3 for the following stages in Hitler's life 1889 - 1909, 1909 - 1913, 1913 - 18, 1918 - 23 and finally 1923 - 22. This information can be given out to groups or pinned up on the wall. I've also included an optional observation sheet for students to use to record their research. The first activity in the lesson is a snowballing starter of the key words to help activate the learning. The second task, the market place activity can be approached in one of two ways. Your first option is for your five groups to rotate around the information, record their five facts and then move on to the next stage in Hitler’s life / career OR for a student from each group to speak for their table and rotate and share what their group has learnt. The aim of this activity is not just to give students an overview of Hitler's life and his ideas, but to also get them to listen, speak and collaborate as effective learners. The final activity, is a plenary class discussion which tries to get students to match Hitler's ideas to different stages in his life. There is no perfect match, it is designed to promote debate. There is a second discussion questions which centers around why did Germans vote for Hitler jobs, bread, ripping up the Treaty of Versailles, revenge or Anti-Semitism? The aims and objectives are: Theme: Germany 1923 - 1933 Know: Who was Adolf Hitler and what did he believe? Understand: How did Hitler’s experiences shape his beliefs? Understand: Why did Hitler join and become leader of the Nazis Party? Evaluate: Why did the membership of the Nazi Party increase? Skills: Narrative, Causes, Consequence, Significance. What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify and describe the key facts about Hitler’s early life? Explain how Hitler’s experiences may have shaped his beliefs? Analyse the reasons why people joined and supported the Nazi Party? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9 Activity:  Causes of the First World War
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Diamond 9 Activity: Causes of the First World War

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This great resource is designed to help students understand why the causes of the First World War 1914 - 1918. The pedagogy underpinning this strategy is that when we rank items, either statements, objects or images, we are required to make explicit the over- arching relationships by which we organise our knowledge and connect our learning. It can used as a starter or plenary and is suitable for middle to upper ability students as a stretch and challenge task. If you would like something aimed at middle to lower ability students, then please check out my card sort of this topic in my TES shop. This task is primarily designed to help students prioritise the different factors in preparation for an extended answer or essay. The resource nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors to explain the causes of the First World War. Once students have cut the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using what you think are the four most important causes of the First World War. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their thinking skills as well as their arguments for writing their essay. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the First World War 1914 - 1918 Know: What were the causes of the First World War? Understand: What were the political, economic and social causes of the First World War? Evaluate: Which factors were the most important? WILF: What Am I Looking for? Identify & describe: The main reasons why the First World War started in 1914? Explain: How did each factor help to start the war? Analyse: Which factors were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my TES shop where you can find many similar ideas and resources. For example, we have a much simpler card sort on the causes of the First World War aimed at middle and lower ability students. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Tudors
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The Tudors

20 Resources
This bundle represents excellent value for money as you will make a 56% saving on some outstanding, tried and test resources on the Tudors. For furthur information about each resource, its aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and a full description, please click on the individual links for each lesson. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: What were the Consequences of the Peasants' Revolt?
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Diamond 9: What were the Consequences of the Peasants' Revolt?

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This outstanding diamond 9 activity has been designed by experienced teachers to help develop students critical thinking skills through their understanding on the consequences of the Peasant’s Revolt in 1381. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity, bit it is primarily designed to provide stretch and challenge for the more able. If you are looking for a main stream resource, then why not check out my card sort activity on this topic? It can be downloaded separately from my TES shop or as a bundle with this resource. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document which can be differentiated further if you wish. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a sellection of ‘short’ and ‘long term’ consequences of the Peasants’ Revolt. Once students have cut out the cards out they are set three tasks including: Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. Sort the remaining diamonds to show which are ‘short’ or ‘long’ term consequences. Record and explain your reasons. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important consequences of the Peasants’ Revolt. Record and explain your reasons. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their critical thinking skills as well as their understanding of the topic. Once stage 3 is complete. students could then have a go at writing an extended answer on ‘what were the conseuences of the Peasants’ Revolt? ,’ The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Medieval Society Know: What happened after the Peasants’ Revolt? Understand: Which changes were ‘long’ or ‘short’ term consequences? Evaluate: which changes were the most important? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What happened after the Peasants’ Revolt? Explain: Which consequences were ‘short’ or ‘long’ term? Analyse: Which changes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: What were the Causes of Britain's Industrial Revolution?
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Diamond 9: What were the Causes of Britain's Industrial Revolution?

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This outstanding resource has been designed by experienced teachers to help develop students critical thinking skills whilst studying the causes of Britain’s Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900. It can be used with middle and upper ability students as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity. If you are looking for a resource to for the full ability spectrum, then why not check out my card sort on this topic, which can be downloaded from my TES shop. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors which explain Britain had an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? The document is provided in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further by changing any of the key factors that I have included. Once students have cut the cards out, they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons why Britain had an Industrial revolution 1750 - 1900. Record and explain the reasons for your choices. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their critical thinking skills as well as their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: How did Britain change from 1750 - 1900? Understand: Why did Britain have an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? Analyse: Which causes were the most important? Skills: Analysis, Evaluation, Discussion & Collaboration WILF: What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify and describe: How did Britain change 1750 - 1900? Explain: Why did Britain have an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? Analyse: begin to form a judgement in which causes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: How bloody was Queen Mary I?
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Card Sort: How bloody was Queen Mary I?

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This great little resource gets students to sort through a series of 12 primary and secondary sources about the reign of Queen Mary I 1553 - 1558, with the aim of deciding whether she deserves the reputation of Bloody Mary. Once this has been complete, students can then have a go at answering the question: Does Mary I deserve the title, ‘Bloody Mary’? I would recommend that this resource should be used with either a core or advanced group as there is a lot of reading, which would be too much for a foundation group with low literacy skills. This resource makes a great starter or plenary. It can be cut up the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Consequences of the break with Rome? Know: Why did Queen Mary I burn protestant heretics? Understand: How has Mary been viewed by both contemporaries and historians? Evaluate: Does Mary I deserve the title ‘Bloody Mary’? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Which sources support / disagree with the ‘Bloody Mary’ interpretation? Explain: Why do people disagree about how ‘Bloody’ Mary I was? Analyze: How far does Queen Mary deserve the title ‘Bloody Mary?’ If you like this resource, I have also created a PowerPoint on the reign of Queen Mary I, with additional information to go along with this card sort. This topic also makes for a great assessment task. Kind Regards Roy
Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme'?
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Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme'?

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This PowerPoint is designed to span two lessons and includes 6 activities to help students assess the tactics that General Haig used at the Battle of the Somme in 1916. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Why was there a stalemate on the Western Front? Know: What tactics did General Haig use at the Battle of the Somme in 1916? Understand: Why did the Battle of the Somme end in a stalemate? Evaluate: Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Analysis and Interpretation WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What happened during the Battle of the Somme in 1916? Explain - Why did Haig’s tactics fail to achieve a breakthrough? Analyse - How far was Haig’s responsible for the failure to break through in 1916? These activities include a snowballing starter, source analysis comparing John Laffin and the BBC’s Blackadder interpretation of General Haig, a contemporary cartoon analysis to assess public reaction in 1916, a summary diagram of why Haig tactics failed and a source analysis comparing the different perspectives of George Coppard and Haig of the progress made on the first day of the attack. I’ve also included a card sort activity which could be used as the basis for an assessment or extended writing on the topic. In all there are 40 slides which can be easily customised for your students. It could also be uploaded to a virtual learning environment and used as an independent learning resource for homework. Professional Knowledge For those of you who are new to the profession, this topic is controversial for a number of reasons. Firstly, the leadership of the British Army during the war is traditionally described by some historians as ‘lions led by donkeys.’ Please note that this interpretation first grew out a dissatisfaction with the Treaty of Versailles and the concept that the First World War would be the ‘War to end all wars’ in the 1930’s. Clearly by then, many of the sacrifices appeared to have been in vain with the rise of Hitler and the threat of war. However, in the immediate aftermath of the First World War, Haig was seen as a hero. He was also the man who set up the Royal British Legion and began the first poppy appeal. Secondly, this topic is controversial for many of our Australian cousins whose sense of national identity grew out of their frustration and anger over the disaster at Gallipoli. This has led to feeling that the British tactics were a complete failure in all theatres of war and has led to the writing of some pretty bad popular history by Australian tour guides like John Laffin in his book ‘British Butchers and Bunglers of WW1’ to almost justify the Republican Movement in Australia. Anyway, have fun and I look forward to your feedback.
NASUWT Preparing for Ofsted - Tops tips and free CPD for teachers
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NASUWT Preparing for Ofsted - Tops tips and free CPD for teachers

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These quality assured resources have been produced by Doncaster NASUWT to help their members prepare for Ofsted. They contain a number of practical tips and advice on a wide range of issues including, but not limited to: Preparing for no notice inspections How do I promote my department and student success? How should I best use my teaching assistant? The behaviour of some of my students is awful, what should I do? How much feedback should I give in my lessons? The videos are presented by Roy Huggins, History Consultant and Head of EBACC and retired member and Advanced Skills Teacher, Keith Old, Doncaster NASUWT. They form part of a specially commissioned series which can be downloaded and watched via our You Tube Channel - Doncaster NASUWT. Please feel free to use and adapt in the spirit of friendly cooperation and support that they resources were created. If you would like any additional CPD please get in touch as both Keith and myself are happy to work with schools and colleges on a range of related issues. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
NASUWT: The role of the Negotiating Secretary / Local Secretary
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NASUWT: The role of the Negotiating Secretary / Local Secretary

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This specially commissioned CPD video for the Doncaster NASUWT is designed to help colleagues in education understand the role of the Negotiating Secretary / Local Secretary and dispel some of the myths. Whilst producing this video, we have drawn upon the experience of colleagues from across our local area who have worked closely with schools and colleges for many years. If you are interested in getting involved as a school rep or in your local executive, then please get in touch with your local association. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. If you are interested you can download a number of CPD videos via the Doncaster NASUWT YouTube Channel. Kind Regards Roy