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Kim Kroll

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I have taught for 22 years- 11 years at a fabulous high school, 9 years at a phenomenal middle school, plus a few more years elsewhere...I have taught 3rd through 12th grades! Recently, I moved across the country and am now a teacher at the ZOO! Seriously!!

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I have taught for 22 years- 11 years at a fabulous high school, 9 years at a phenomenal middle school, plus a few more years elsewhere...I have taught 3rd through 12th grades! Recently, I moved across the country and am now a teacher at the ZOO! Seriously!!
Harris Burdick Writing a Narrative Lesson
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Harris Burdick Writing a Narrative Lesson

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"The Mysteries of Harris Burdick" by Chris Van Allsburg is the basis for this creative writing lesson. Check out the reviews below. The text is not included. Please secure a copy of "The Mysteries of Harris Burdick" by Chris Van Allsburg before buying this product as you will need the pictures for the lesson. This product includes: EATS Lesson plan Powerpoint Student worksheets Brainstorming worksheet Peer conference worksheet After teaching/ brainstorming the first day, the class will write (like their fingers are on fire!) for days 2-5. I have added a simple PowerPoint, but it is not essential to teaching the lesson. The PPT is editable if you desire to make changes. Fun lesson for your creative writers! Thank you.
Phrases and Clauses
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Phrases and Clauses

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This is a PowerPoint, lesson plan, several worksheets and activities on phrases and clauses. An EATS lesson plan (tied to the Common Core Standards) as well as two graphic organizers are included. Complete with an essential question, activating strategy, vocabulary, teaching strategies, and an exit ticket, students learn the difference between phrases and clauses. In Part 1, students are shown examples of each phrase type: Noun phrase Verb phrase Adjectival phrase Adverbial phrase Participial phrase Prepositional phrase Absolute phrase The class will fill out a graphic organizer, practice with partners and practice individually using different phrases. In Part 2, students are shown examples of each clause type: Independent Clause Dependent Clause Noun Clause Relative Clause Adjectival Clause Again, the class will fill out a graphic organizer, practice with partners, and practice individually using different clauses. In Part 3, students get a chance to review. There are opportunities for differentiation in the activities. For example, on the PPT, students are asked to create example sentences. To challenge students, teachers may opt to ask students to use a topic. On Worksheet #5, students are challenged to identify phrase/clause types. Lastly, students will complete an exit ticket. This is a complete lesson- ready for your classroom. Thank you!
"The Bracelet" by Yoshiko Uchida
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"The Bracelet" by Yoshiko Uchida

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This no-prep lesson is includes a powerpoint, printables, plan and more to make teaching this short story a breeze! Included: -- Lesson Plan in EATS format with an Essential Question, vocabulary, activating strategy, teaching strategies, and a summarizing strategy (Exit Ticket)- aligned with the CCSS.Lit. 6.3 & 6.5 -- an original PowerPoint- that showcases the vocabulary definitions, discussion questions, sample answers, and more. Some slides have timers to keep students motivated to keep their discussions alive. --PALS reading strategy- a technique for reading to allow all students to read aloud (I use this a lot with short stories in my classroom!) --- 3 printable worksheets- No prep- Just print and go! ---an activity to mimic the author’s style. Students get to try their hand at writing a paragraph using Uchida’s sentence formation and style. --- Answer Keys -- two optional slides for differentiation. Students didn’t fully master the essential question? I have included an EXTRA Sample Answer. I often display this one as students are writing their exit tickets- so they can refer to it if they get “stuck.” A sample answer can also be printed and sent home for students to use as they write their own responses. The SAMPLE RESPONSE to the Essential Question is extremely helpful to struggling students. The sample is based on "The Three Little Pigs." Students get to see- and critique- a response before they are expected to write. Characterization is discussed in detail. Note: * Some of the activities and slides from this lesson come directly from my original product entitled “The Smallest Dragonboy.” If you have the short story “The Bracelet” by Yoshiko Uchida in your anthology, this lesson is for you! Created to be easy to use and fully engaging, the lesson plan pairs with the worksheets to be very successful with “The Bracelet,” a short story found in most middle school anthologies. The PowerPoint is very helpful to provide students examples and activities- and keep them in the right place! Thanks so much! ~Kim
Symbolism in Literature / Literary Symbolism
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Symbolism in Literature / Literary Symbolism

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Students learn how to uncover the meaning and how to analyze the role of symbols in literature in this two-day interactive lesson. The class will discuss literary symbolism using examples on the PowerPoint. There are opportunities within the lesson to brainstorm ideas before students are expected to work individually. The EATS lesson plan includes an Essential Question, Activating Strategy, Teaching Strategies and an Exit Ticket. Students will understand how to correctly answer the Essential Question by the end of the second day- because they have been taught the strategies, they have worked collaboratively, they have seen a model answer, and they have worked individually. This product includes: • A powerpoint • A worksheet • An activity • An exit ticket • Assessment • Answer keys This lesson covers: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.4 through 11-12.4 (determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text) CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL. 8.1 through 11-12.1 Analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text (cite the textual evidence) CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL .11-12.6 Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant
Brain Breaks for the Secondary Student
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Brain Breaks for the Secondary Student

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Brain Breaks for your older students are physical activities that give your students a quick break so they return to the lesson with a better focus.    No prep: Just print and cut  Less than 4 minutes  Easy for Teacher and Students  Stress Reliever If a few of your students are hesitant to join in, offer to give the best participant one extra point on the current assignment. After the initial motivation, you will notice that students enjoy- and request brain breaks. Option 1 (SLIDES 4-10) Cut and pass out cards to individual students (four to a page). Option 2 (SLIDES 11-38) Show the entire class the PowerPoint slide. There are 28 brain breaks. Notes** Cards 1- 21 are for individual student movement. Card 22 requires 4 paperclips for each student. Card 23 requires an item for each student such as a pencil or piece of paper. Cards 24-28 are whole class activities and require teacher interaction. **You may want to listen to the pronunciation of the word on Card 26 before you begin (the pronunciation is available on Dictionary.com.) If you have any suggestions, please contact me at luckykroll@hotmail.com. Thank you! ~Kim
Eleven by Sandra Cisneros
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Eleven by Sandra Cisneros

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An EATS lesson plan with an Essential Question, vocabulary, activating strategy, teaching strategies, and a summarizing strategy (Exit Ticket). ✓Worksheets- Just print and go! ✓Answer key ... are all included. ✓ The 20-slide PowerPoint, 5-page lesson plan, and 2-page worksheet are aligned with the CCSS.Lit. 6-7.3 & 6-7.5. Created to be easy to use and fully engaging, the lesson plan pairs with the worksheets that I have created to be very successful with "Eleven," a short story found in most middle school anthologies. The lesson has a sample answer to the Essential Question (How do characters respond to change as the plot moves toward a resolution?), which I have found to be extremely helpful for students. They are able to see an effective answer before they are expected to write one. The sample is on "The Three Little Pigs." Students get to discuss the example answer before they write their own response for the exit ticket. I have also included the instructions and sample for the PALS reading strategy- as I've found this to be an effective strategy with short stories in my classroom. Students will discuss being eleven, write a six-word memoir, read “Name” from House on Mango Street, and more. External and Internal conflict are discussed. If you have the short story “Eleven” by Sandra Cisneros in your anthology, this lesson is for you!
Charles by Shirley Jackson Lesson PLUS
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Charles by Shirley Jackson Lesson PLUS

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This is a complete lesson for the short story “Charles” by Shirley Jackson. No prep necessary! This product includes: ---3 day lesson plan in EATS format (including an activating strategy, teaching strategies, and more…) ---4 printable worksheets (including comprehension questions, writing prompts, exit tickets, and more…) ---Answer Keys ---41- Slide PowerPoint (including methods of characterization, PALS reading strategy, Sample Answer for the Essential Question, and more…)This is a great short story for the middle school! The lesson discusses: explicit details vs. implicit details, inferring, static vs. dynamic characters, and theme. During the three days, students are given the opportunity to work independently, in pairs, in groups, through writing, through speech, etc. Various activities will help with differentiated learning. This lesson is particularly effective in helping students answer the Essential Question (How can a reader determine theme of a text?) because a sample student answer is given for the class to critique. Students will independently answer the E.Q. at the culmination of the lesson (on Day 3!). I hope you enjoy this lesson ! This lesson is Common Core aligned to: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
Types of Sentences : Simple, Complex, Compound and CC Sentence Structure
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Types of Sentences : Simple, Complex, Compound and CC Sentence Structure

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This lesson focuses on helping middle school students identify the different types of sentence. Students will notice that each structure signals differing relationships among ideas, as based on the Common Core Standard 7.1.b . This is a challenging topic. I have worked on this product to bring some fun to the lesson. I have included: # a PowerPoint, # a lesson plan (with activating strategy, vocabulary, exit ticket, etc.), # a graphic organizer # worksheets # FIVE activities, # a quick quiz, # a vocabulary list # answer keys and # a Your Turn exit ticket The lesson plan is detailed so that it is easy for the teacher to teach each structure with an activity (or two) without getting overwhelmed! The 66-slide PowerPoint is filled with information and is easy for students to follow- especially as they fill in their graphic organizer. There are visuals included. Plus, there is a silent activity where students guess by using sign language letter to show their choice! Fun! I have also included the worksheets in PDF in case that works best for you! CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1.b Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas. Thank you!
"Miss Awful" by Arthur Cavanaugh
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"Miss Awful" by Arthur Cavanaugh

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This lesson is on the short story "Miss Awful," by Arthur Cavanaugh. Please make sure you have a copy of the text in your anthology. ✓ This set includes a PowerPoint, 2 Worksheets, Written Response (Essay Prompts), Vocabulary Worksheets, Vocabulary Quiz, Final Test, Exit Tickets, and Answer Keys. ✓ The EATS lesson plan includes: Essential Question, vocabulary, activating strategy, teaching strategies, and an Exit Ticket. ✓ The lesson plan and worksheets are a time-saver. Just print and go! Answer keys are included. ✓ The PowerPoint will help with pacing the lesson (especially if you are getting observed!) and will help students focus on the most important components of the lesson. I has also answered the essential question (using "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" example) so that students will be able to discuss how to critique an effective response. Teachers can display this sample answer when students are completing the exit ticket. The Common Core Focus is: CCSS.ELA-RL.6.1/ 7/1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Thank you!
Connotation and Denotation Shades of Meaning
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Connotation and Denotation Shades of Meaning

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Students will follow the PowerPoint to find out what connotation is- and find FOUR STRATEGIES to use to uncover nuances in meaning. This lesson uses task cards, a game, and worksheet to capture students' attention. Check the feedback below. This product includes: -- an EATS lesson (with essential question, activating strategy, vocabulary, etc.) -- two worksheets -- answer keys --40 Task Cards for writing a paragraph --40 more Task Cards for writing a haiku (for others to guess the subject!) --Match Up GAME Focus: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5, L.7.5 , L.8.5 and CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5.c, L.7.5.c, L.8.5.c The class will see examples of writing that are negative and examples that are positive- and learn what shades of meaning are. The essential question also is the exit ticket. A sample answer is included so students can LEARN the answer. After they have learned the concept, they will be expected to understand and write it. The task cards are great for individual practice. Students love sharing what they have written. For differentiated instruction, I have included task cards on Haikus. Students focus on word choice as they write a haiku on a given subject. When complete, they read the haiku to the class and the class will guess their subject. Example: Student A reads: Brown or white mammal With hooves and tail, she’s lazy. She provides breakfast. The class guesses: a cow! Students enjoy this activity! There is an additional worksheet included for those who are struggling- and need additional practice. I encourage my students to use the thesaurus if they want. Thank you!
Timeline Graphic Organizer
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Timeline Graphic Organizer

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This one page printable is ready for students to fill in. Ten text boxes are provided. Each text box has a blank for the year and lines so that students can fill in a description of the events. Great for novels, non-fiction, autobiography life lines, history and more! Thank you!
High School Exit Tickets
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High School Exit Tickets

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High School Exit Tickets (a.k.a. Exit Slips) are based on Common Core Standards and can be used with any selection, any day! Just print, cut and distribute! You can use each of the twenty tickets with EACH of the selections you assign. Although these are titled “Exit Tickets,” they can be used as Activating strategies, homework slips, prompts for extemporaneous speeches, task cards… The uses are MANY. I have found these cards to be very successful with collaborative pairs as an informal assessment. Each of the 20 printable pages has four Exit Tickets. If you need 40 exit tickets, make 10 copies. Simply print and cut along the lines. You may choose to laminate and keep them in a Ziplock bag to use more than once. (Since they work with any selection, students will benefit from repeated practice!) Two Exit Tickets that are included in this product: “How did one character develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot? (based on CCSS) If the main character transported to the past (or the future), how well would s/he endure? (based on Bloom’s Taxonomy) Each card will be the same size (easy collecting and stacking!). A box at the bottom of each card is provided for the score (easy grading!). Thank you! Exit Slips are the students' tickets to get out of the door!
Euphemisms and Oxymora (A.K.A. Oxymorons): Fun with Figurative Languag
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Euphemisms and Oxymora (A.K.A. Oxymorons): Fun with Figurative Languag

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This 9th- 10th grade resource consists of a PowerPoint, a Lesson plan, 3 worksheets and an answer key- everything you need to teach euphemisms and oxymora, based on the Common Core Standards L.9-10.5 and L.9-10.5a. The PowerPoint discusses euphemisms and oxymora, giving several examples and opportunities for students to participate in discussions. The class will follow along with the lesson by filling in the first two worksheets. The class will begin with an Activating Strategy and move into a discussion on the obstacles people face while learning English and encountering euphemisms. Students will pair up and brainstorm euphemisms and oxymora- as well as guess what the illustration on the PowerPoint represents. Students will be challenged to answer the Essential Questions: How can I uncover the meanings of euphemism and oxymoron? AND How do I analyze the role of euphemism and oxymorons inside of a text? Differentiated instruction is offered with extra challenges- such as providing the definition of the opposite of euphemism (dysphemism). Students will be given a chance to review before completing an Exit Ticket. A third optional worksheet is included for fun- or for extra differentiation, if there is a need for extra practice. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
Theme Task Cards for Secondary Students
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Theme Task Cards for Secondary Students

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Theme task cards are great practice BEFORE, DURING, or AFTER a lesson on theme! Based on Common Core. RI.6.2, 7.2, 8.2, and 9-10.2, these task cards present students with a reading selection and 3 multiple choice options. Students select the correct theme! Students can then pair and discuss- or continue until all 20 are completed. Included are: SET of 20 original Task Cards Answer Sheets Answer Keys Optional Activity Students read a selection on each card and decide which is the best theme. These cards are an easy way to check student understanding of theme, but can be used in many more ways: Entrance Tickets, Exit Tickets, Differentiation, Comprehension Check, Homework… They might also be used as a springboard for discussion on how the author accomplishes his/ her theme. Theme Task Cards are included in: Kroll Task Card Bundle One of my favorite ways to use is as follows: Make copies of each slide, but do not cut apart. Each student will answer all four items on one page (on the answer sheet provided). The next day, as students enter the room, they will receive the next page. Continue until all answers are completed. On the fifth day, students pair up and check answers. Give students time to re-read any that are different from their partners. Turn in for a grade. Have students write on task cards – or laminate and use the task cards year after year. Focus: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Mother and Daughter by Gary Soto
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Mother and Daughter by Gary Soto

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The powerpoint, worksheets, lesson, and more are aligned with the 7th grade standards for this short story by Gary Soto. Check out the reviews! I have included: --a 2-day EATS lesson plan with an Essential Question, preview vocabulary, activating strategy, teaching strategies, and a summarizing strategy (Exit Ticket) -- two worksheets- just print and go! -- a 24-slide PowerPoint -- answer keys -- printable Exit Tickets -- printable Exit Ticket Sample Answers for student pairs to critique I have also included the definitions to the vocabulary, a review on the elements of a short story, PowerPoint slides with timers (to keep students focused on discussions), and sample responses to questions (for students to analyze- or use as a model). This product turns the short story “Mother and Daughter” into an interactive lesson. Make sure you have a copy of the story before buying this product. Due to copyright laws, it is not provided with this purchase. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). Thank you!
Reading, Listening and Viewing a Text ... Pompeii
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Reading, Listening and Viewing a Text ... Pompeii

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If you are looking for a high-interest topic to tackle the reading, viewing, and listening standard, look no further! Pompeii, Mt. Vesuvius' eruption, lava, Pliny the Younger... it's all here. The videos are superb, the the text is rigorous (but short, accessible- and has humor!) and the audio is great. I LOVE teaching Pompeii because the students are fully engaged- mesmerized! 1) The text for READING is by Pliny the Younger. A first-hand account of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Knowing that students may struggle a bit with the language, I have created a paired activity where students summarize each sentence. I have included my summary of each sentence (in case they get stuck- or ) to compare with the student's finished activity. Yes, Pliny actually calls his uncle out for snoring! 2) The LISTENING text is "The Dog of Pompeii" by Louis Untermyer. If you don't have the text in your anthology, try this link to the audio. (It's free!) http://readlifelong.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/6/1/13617939/dog_of_pompeii_01.mp3 Students individually complete a worksheet (included) after reading. 3) The VIEWING component uses two videos readily available on the web- one made by PBS that is 2 minutes in length (but packs a punch!) and another lengthier, informative video. Check it out here: http://science.howstuffworks.com/nature/natural-disasters/mount-vesuvius1.htm Once the students have completed activities on EACH of the modes, there is a writing assignment. The writing assignment begins as a group activity. Groups will write a paragraph and compare to my sample paragraph. Then, students work individually for the final assessment- a similar paragraph that compares the three modes: reading, listening, and viewing. This is a week-long lesson, but you can just teach a part of this lesson if you are focusing on other standards (For example, you may have "Dog of Pompeii" in your anthology. You can use the worksheets and activity for just this story instead of teaching the entire unit). I have listed the links below so you can check out the awesomeness of the modes in this lesson before you purchase. I LOVE them and they work really well with this standard. Thanks so much for your interest. Enjoy teaching Pompeii! Please check out these links to make sure you will like the subject matter before you purchase. http://www.pompeii.org.uk/s.php/tour-the-two-letters-written-by-pliny-the-elder-about-the-eruption-of-vesuvius-in-79-a-d-history-of-pompeii-en-238-s.htm http://readlifelong.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/6/1/13617939/dog_of_pompeii_01.mp3 http://science.howstuffworks.com/nature/natural-disasters/mount-vesuvius1.htm http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets/episodes/herculaneum-uncovered/108/
Venn Diagram Lined Graphic Organizer (Extra Lg, Triple and Block) Printable
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Venn Diagram Lined Graphic Organizer (Extra Lg, Triple and Block) Printable

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This printable requires no prep; print- and students to fill in. Different versions can be used in subjects ranging from literature to history to culinary arts to musical composition! Includes One extra large colored Two-Circle Venn Diagram One extra large Two-Circle Venn Diagram, black and white One Colored Three-Circle Venn Diagram One Three-Circle Venn Diagram, black and white One BLOCK Venn- easy to fill out! All Venn Diagrams are lined- so students can easily write inside! I have found the extra large Venn Diagram to be very successful! Some students prefer the BLOCK version. This five-slide PowerPoint in pdf is ready to print! Thanks! Great for novels, non-fiction, autobiography life lines, history and more!
Rosa Parks : "An Interview: I Was Not Alone" Cause and Effect, Nelson Mandela
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Rosa Parks : "An Interview: I Was Not Alone" Cause and Effect, Nelson Mandela

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Nelson Mandela's "Long Walk to Freedom" and Rita Dove's "An Interview: I Was Not Alone" (an essay on Rosa Parks) are perfect short non-fiction selections for Black History Month. Focus on heroes, cause and effect, black history, and more! This resource includes: --one-page lesson plan, --three worksheets, --a basic PowerPoint for Rosa Parks, ---a PALS instruction and example, and --answer keys. The PowerPoint is editable for your convenience. Using the Common Core Standards and Learning Focused, I have included an EATS lesson plan with an Essential Question, preview vocabulary (including CAUSE and EFFECT), activating strategy, teaching strategies and a summarizing strategy (Exit Ticket). Further, this lesson pairs students to work on cause and effect together. The texts of "An Interview: I Was Not Alone" and "The Long Walk to Freedom" are NOT included due to copyright laws. Please make sure you have access to the texts before purchasing this resource. The lesson plan, worksheets, and PPT are time-saving and effective. Thank you!
The Moods of a Verb... Indicative... Subjunctive...
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The Moods of a Verb... Indicative... Subjunctive...

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Verb Mood... is a Common Core necessity! Verb Moods - Subjective. Conditional. Imperative. Interrogative. Indicative. I've tried to make this topic a little snazzy. Generally, students feel that verb moods are a bunch of big words that are not relevant to them. My goal is to connect a visual with each mood and have students understand each mood through various activities. This EATS lesson includes: --a very helpful graphic organizer -- the content standard and essential question -- preview vocabulary -- Fantastic PowerPoint with the definition and example of each mood: Indicative, Imperative, Interrogative, Conditional and Subjunctive -- a review -- a writing activity -- an Exit Ticket The graphic organizer works really well with my 8th graders! Students connect to the visuals and can use this g.o. with future assignments! This PowerPoint is accompanied by an EATS lesson plan. This lesson focuses on: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking, AND (especially) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.1c Form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood. The Essential Questions used are: -- How can I use verbs correctly in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive moods? -- How can I form verbs correctly in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive moods? Thanks so much!- Kim Kroll
O. Henry Biographical Information
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O. Henry Biographical Information

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This 26- slide PowerPoint gives great background biographical information of America's beloved writer, O. Henry. Paired with a worksheet, you may use as an example of any historical figure for a research project. This resource can serve as a great introduction for any class studying O. Henry's short stories. The accompanying worksheet will assure students follow along with the PowerPoint presentation. The answer key is included. This is perfect to use as an example of a finished project- when students are assigned to make a PowerPoint on a historical figure.