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Mr Science

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Head of science Check out my Youtube channel for free videos to support your teaching, https://www.youtube.com/mrscience88

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Head of science Check out my Youtube channel for free videos to support your teaching, https://www.youtube.com/mrscience88
AQA GCSE Biology- Respiration
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AQA GCSE Biology- Respiration

(4)
**Get a discount on this resource when you buy directly from www.mrscience.co.uk ** Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE course but can be modified for other exam boards. 29 slides cover: respiration. By the end of the powerpoint students would have covered /: 4.4.2.1 Aerobic and anaerobic respiration Students should be able to describe cellular respiration as an exothermic reaction which is continuously occurring in living cells. The energy transferred supplies all the energy needed for living processes. Respiration in cells can take place aerobically (using oxygen) or anaerobically (without oxygen), to transfer energy. Students should be able to compare the processes of aerobic and anaerobic respiration with regard to the need for oxygen, the differing products and the relative amounts of energy transferred. Organisms need energy for: • chemical reactions to build larger molecules • movement • keeping warm. Aerobic respiration is represented by the equation: glucose + oxygen --> carbon dioxide + water Students should recognise the chemical symbols: C6H12O6, O2, CO2 and H2O. Anaerobic respiration in muscles is represented by the equation: glucose  lactic acid As the oxidation of glucose is incomplete in anaerobic respiration much less energy is transferred than in aerobic respiration. Anaerobic respiration in plant and yeast cells is represented by the equation: Glucose --> ethanol + carbon dioxide Anaerobic respiration in yeast cells is called fermentation and has economic importance in the manufacture of bread and alcoholic drinks. **4.4.2.2 Response to exercise ** During exercise the human body reacts to the increased demand for energy. The heart rate, breathing rate and breath volume increase during exercise to supply the muscles with more oxygenated blood. If insufficient oxygen is supplied anaerobic respiration takes place in muscles. The incomplete oxidation of glucose causes a build up of lactic acid and creates an oxygen debt. During long periods of vigorous activity muscles become fatigued and stop contracting efficiently. (HT only) Blood flowing through the muscles transports the lactic acid to the liver where it is converted back into glucose. Oxygen debt is the amount of extra oxygen the body needs after exercise to react with the accumulated lactic acid and remove it from the cells.
AQA GCSE Biology- Culturing microorganisms
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AQA GCSE Biology- Culturing microorganisms

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See our website for more resources: www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE( covers spec point 4.1.1 ) course but can be modified for other exam boards. 19 slides covering Culturing microorganisms: -State how bacteria multiple -Describe how to prepare an uncontaminated culture using aseptic technique -Calculate cross-sectional areas of colonies -Calculate the number of bacteria in a population after a certain time if given the mean division time -Required practical activity 2: investigate the effect of antiseptics or antibiotics on bacterial growth using agar plates and measuring zones of inhibition.
AQA GCSE Biology- The human nervous system
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AQA GCSE Biology- The human nervous system

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Get a discount on this resource when you buy directly from www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE course but can be modified for other exam boards. 21 slides covering The nervous system By the end of the powerpoint students would have covered: 4.5.2.1 Structure and function Students should be able to explain how the structure of the nervous system is adapted to its functions. The nervous system enables humans to react to their surroundings and to coordinate their behaviour. Information from receptors passes along cells (neurones) as electrical impulses to the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS is the brain and spinal cord. The CNS coordinates the response of effectors which may be muscles contracting or glands secreting hormones. stimulus --> receptor --> coordinator -->effector -->response Students should be able to explain how the various structures in a reflex arc – including the sensory neurone, synapse, relay neurone and motor neurone – relate to their function. Students should understand why reflex actions are important. Reflex actions are automatic and rapid; they do not involve the conscious part of the brain. Required practical activity 7: plan and carry out an investigation into the effect of a factor on human reaction time.
AQA GCSE Biology-Hormones in human reproduction
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AQA GCSE Biology-Hormones in human reproduction

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Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE( covers spec point 4.5.3.4 ) course but can be modified for other exam boards. 23 slides covering Hormones in human reproduction: By the end of the powerpoint students would have covered: 4.5.3.4 Hormones in human reproduction Students should be able to describe the roles of hormones in human reproduction, including the menstrual cycle. During puberty reproductive hormones cause secondary sex characteristics to develop. Oestrogen is the main female reproductive hormone produced in the ovary. At puberty eggs begin to mature and one is released approximately every 28 days. This is called ovulation. Testosterone is the main male reproductive hormone produced by the testes and it stimulates sperm production. Several hormones are involved in the menstrual cycle of a woman. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) causes maturation of an egg in the ovary. Luteinising hormone (LH) stimulates the release of the egg. Oestrogen and progesterone are involved in maintaining the uterus lining. (HT only) Students should be able to explain the interactions of FSH, oestrogen, LH and progesterone, in the control of the menstrual cycle. (HT only) Students should be able to extract and interpret data from graphs showing hormone levels during the menstrual cycle. Contains examination questions Alternative starter question for triple or combined science students.
AQA GCSE Biology- The Brain
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AQA GCSE Biology- The Brain

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Get a discount on this resource when you buy directly from www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE course but can be modified for other exam boards. 17 slides covering The Brain. By the end of the powerpoint students would have covered: 4.5.2.2 The brain (biology only) The brain controls complex behaviour. It is made of billions of interconnected neurones and has different regions that carry out different functions. Students should be able to identify the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and medulla on a diagram of the brain, and describe their functions. (HT only) Students should be able to explain some of the difficulties of investigating brain function and treating brain damage and disease. (HT only) Neuroscientists have been able to map the regions of the brain to particular functions by studying patients with brain damage, electrically stimulating different parts of the brain and using MRI scanning techniques. The complexity and delicacy of the brain makes investigating and treating brain disorders very difficult.
AQA GCSE Biology -Plant tissues, organs and systems
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AQA GCSE Biology -Plant tissues, organs and systems

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www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE course but can be modified for other exam boards. 26 slides covering Plant tissues, organs and systems. By the end of the powerpoint students would have covered: 4.2.3.1 Plant tissues 4.2.3.2 Plant organ system
Reaction profiles
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Reaction profiles

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Check out my other resources at: www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/mr_science Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE( covers spec point 4.5.1.2 ) course but can be modified for other exam boards. 16 slides covering Reaction profiles. By the end of the powerpoint students would have covered: Define the term activation energy Draw a reaction profile for exothermic and endothermic reactions Interpret reaction profiles for exothermic and endothermic reactions Describe bond breaking and bond making in terms of energy
IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Genetic modification (genetic engineering)
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IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Genetic modification (genetic engineering)

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www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification IGCSE Edexcel course but can be used for other examination boards. Covers: © Genetic modification (genetic engineering) 5.12  understand how restriction enzymes are used to cut DNA at specific sites and ligase enzymes are used to join pieces of DNA together 5.13  understand how plasmids and viruses can act as vectors, which take up pieces of DNA, and then insert this recombinant DNA into other cells 5.14  understand how large amounts of human insulin can be manufactured from genetically modified bacteria that are grown in a fermenter 5.15  understand how genetically modified plants can be used to improve food production 5.16  understand that the term transgenic means the transfer of genetic material from one species to a different species
IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Gas exchange (Flowering plants) *UPDATED*
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IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Gas exchange (Flowering plants) *UPDATED*

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www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification IGCSE Edexcel course but can be used for other examination boards. Covers: (g) Gas exchange Flowering plants 2.40B understand the role of diffusion in gas exchange 2.41B understand gas exchange (of carbon dioxide and oxygen) in relation to respiration and photosynthesis 2.42B understand how the structure of the leaf is adapted for gas exchange 2.43B describe the role of stomata in gas exchange 2.44B understand how respiration continues during the day and night, but that the net exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen depends on the intensity of light 2.45B practical: investigate the effect of light on net gas exchange from a leaf, using hydrogen-carbonate indicator Includes a video for flipped learning.
IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Reproduction (Flowering plants) *Updated*
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IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Reproduction (Flowering plants) *Updated*

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www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification IGCSE edexcel course but can be used for other examination boards. Covers: (a) Reproduction 3.1  understand the differences between sexual and asexual reproduction 3.2  understand that fertilisation involves the fusion of a male and female gamete to produce a zygote that undergoes cell division and develops into an embryo Flowering plants 3.3  describe the structures of an insect-pollinated and a wind-pollinated flower and explain how each is adapted for pollination 3.4  understand that the growth of the pollen tube followed by fertilisation leads to seed and fruit formation 3.5  practical: investigate the conditions needed for seed germination 3.6  understand how germinating seeds utilise food reserves until the seedling can carry out photosynthesis 3.7  understand that plants can reproduce asexually by natural methods (illustrated by runners) and by artificial methods (illustrated by cuttings)
AQA GCSE Biology - The use of hormones to treat infertility
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AQA GCSE Biology - The use of hormones to treat infertility

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Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE( covers spec point 4.5.3.6 ) course but can be modified for other exam boards. 20 slides covering the use of hormones to treat infertility: Describe what is meant by infertility and suggest reasons for it Describe the steps used in IVF Describe how FSH and IVF can be used to help treat infertility Evaluate from the perspective of patients and doctors the methods of treating infertility
IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Nervous and Endocrine system *Updated*
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IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Nervous and Endocrine system *Updated*

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Get a discount on this resource when you buy directly from www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification IGCSE edexcel course but can be used for other examination boards. Covers: Humans 2.86  describe how nervous and hormonal communication control responses and understand the differences between the two systems 2.87  understand that the central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord and is linked to sense organs by nerves 2.88  understand that stimulation of receptors in the sense organs sends electrical impulses along nerves into and out of the central nervous system, resulting in rapid responses 2.89  understand the role of neurotransmitters at synapses 2.90  describe the structure and functioning of a simple reflex arc illustrated by the withdrawal of a finger from a hot object 2.91  describe the structure and function of the eye as a receptor 2.92  understand the function of the eye in focusing on near and distant objects, and in responding to changes in light intensity 2.93  describe the role of the skin in temperature regulation, with reference to sweating, vasoconstriction and vasodilation 2.94  understand the sources, roles and effects of the following hormones: adrenaline, insulin, testosterone, progesterone and oestrogen 2.95B understand the sources, roles and effects of the following hormones: ADH, FSH and LH
IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Photosynthesis *UPDATED*
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IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Photosynthesis *UPDATED*

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www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification IGCSE Edexcel course but can be used for other examination boards. Covers: (e) Nutrition Flowering plants 2.18 understand the process of photosynthesis and its importance in the conversion of light energy to chemical energy 2.19 know the word equation and the balanced chemical symbol equation for photosynthesis 2.20 understand how varying carbon dioxide concentration, light intensity and temperature affect the rate of photosynthesis 2.21 describe the structure of the leaf and explain how it is adapted for photosynthesis 2.22 understand that plants require mineral ions for growth, and that magnesium ions are needed for chlorophyll and nitrate ions are needed for amino acids 2.23 practical: investigate photosynthesis, showing the evolution of oxygen from a water plant, the production of starch and the requirements of light, carbon dioxide and chlorophyll
IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Diffusion, Osmosis and Active transport *UPDATED*
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IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Diffusion, Osmosis and Active transport *UPDATED*

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www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification IGCSE Edexcel course but can be used for other examination boards. Covers: (d) Movement of substances into and out of cells 2.15 understand the processes of diffusion, osmosis and active transport by which substances move into and out of cells 2.16 understand how factors affect the rate of movement of substances into and out of cells, including the effects of surface area to volume ratio, distance, temperature and concentration gradient 2.17 practical: investigate diffusion and osmosis using living and non-living systems
AQA GCSE Biology-Metabolism
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AQA GCSE Biology-Metabolism

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Get a discount on this resource when you buy directly from www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE course but can be modified for other exam boards. 17 slides covering Metabolism. By the end of the powerpoint students would have covered: 4.4.2.3 Metabolism Students should be able to explain the importance of sugars, amino acids, fatty acids and glycerol in the synthesis and breakdown of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Metabolism is the sum of all the reactions in a cell or the body. The energy transferred by respiration in cells is used by the organism for the continual enzyme controlled processes of metabolism that synthesise new molecules. Metabolism includes: conversion of glucose to starch, glycogen and cellulose the formation of lipid molecules from a molecule of glycerol and three molecules of fatty acids the use of glucose and nitrate ions to form amino acids which in turn are used to synthesise proteins respiration breakdown of excess proteins to form urea for excretion.
AQA GCSE Biology- Human endocrine system
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AQA GCSE Biology- Human endocrine system

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www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification AQA GCSE course but can be modified for other exam boards. 25 slides covering the human endocrine system. By the end of the powerpoint students would have covered: **4.5.3.1 Human endocrine system ** Students should be able to describe the principles of hormonal coordination and control by the human endocrine system. The endocrine system is composed of glands which secrete chemicals called hormones directly into the bloodstream. The blood carries the hormone to a target organ where it produces an effect. Compared to the nervous system the effects are slower but act for longer. The pituitary gland in the brain is a ‘master gland’ which secretes several hormones into the blood in response to body conditions. These hormones in turn act on other glands to stimulate other hormones to be released to bring about effects. Students should be able to identify the position of the following on a diagram of the human body: pituitary gland pancreas thyroid adrenal gland ovary testes. Contains examination questions
IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Biological molecules *UPDATED*
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IGCSE Edexcel Biology (9-1) Biological molecules *UPDATED*

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www.mrscience.co.uk Designed for the new specification IGCSE edexcel course but can be used for other examination boards. Covers: ( c ) Biological molecules 2.7 identify the chemical elements present in carbohydrates, proteins and lipids (fats and oils) 2.8 describe the structure of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids as large molecules made up from smaller basic units: starch and glycogen from simple sugars, protein from amino acids, and lipid from fatty acids and glycerol 2.9 practical: investigate food samples for the presence of glucose, starch, protein and fat 2.10 understand the role of enzymes as biological catalysts in metabolic reactions 2.11 understand how temperature changes can affect enzyme function, including changes to the shape of active site 2.12 practical: investigate how enzyme activity can be affected by changes in temperature 2.13 understand how enzyme function can be affected by changes in pH altering the active site  2.14B practical: investigate how enzyme activity can be affected by changes in pH Contains exam style questions
AQA Acceleration required practical
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AQA Acceleration required practical

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If you are looking for a lesson on the topic check out my acceleration lessson below: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/acceleration-11850810 Investigate: -the effect of varying the force on the acceleration of an object of constant mass -the effect of varying the mass of an object on the acceleration produced by a constant force.
Eutrophication
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Eutrophication

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Free resource that can be used as part of your powerpoint when teaching the topic. It’s not inteded to be a full lesson.