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Pompey Rich's Geographical Emporium (est in the year 10,191)

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Following a career in the Albanian Special Forces, then 17 years as a professional sumo in Kyoto... I now teach Geography *)

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Following a career in the Albanian Special Forces, then 17 years as a professional sumo in Kyoto... I now teach Geography *)
Tectonics 2: "AIN'T NO MOUNTAIN HIGH ENOUGH"
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Tectonics 2: "AIN'T NO MOUNTAIN HIGH ENOUGH"

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Powerpoint and worksheets covering destructive plate margins and collision zones Starter looks at the highest and tallest mountains on Earth, then compares them with Mons Olympus on Mars . Destructive margins activity is a mystery, answering the question "Why are there a line of volcanoes down the western coast of South America?" Collision zones activity answers the question "Why are there marine fossils on top of Mount Everest?" Plenary looks at how the African-Eurasian margin has created the hills and valleys of south-east England Includes video links and differentiated questions
Tectonics 1: "THIS IS PLANET EARTH"
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Tectonics 1: "THIS IS PLANET EARTH"

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Powerpoint and worksheets introducing the causes of tectonic movement. Starter reviews pupils' prior knowledge of the structure of the Earth and then builds on this with an annotated divided bar graph of the Earth's layers. Goes on to look at the role of convection, ridge push and slab pull using the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Iceland as Case Studies. Includes video links and differentiated questions.
CLIMATE CHANGE 9: "Climate Change in Egypt  SDME"
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CLIMATE CHANGE 9: "Climate Change in Egypt SDME"

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A decision making exercise (set up as a lesson) looking at future options for feeding Egypt's growing population. Egypt’s climate is changing. Over the next few decades the country is expected to become even hotter and drier than it already is. Presently, oil makes up 25% of Egypt’s exports but this is predicted to run out by 2070. At the same time, the population is expected to grow by tens of millions more people. The Government will need to find a SUSTAINABLE way to feed all these extra mouths very soon. Option 1: Turn more of the Sahara Desert into irrigated farmland by flooding the Qattara Depression Option 2: Build sea defences around the farmland in the Nile Delta of northern Egypt Option 3: Bomb the Ethiopian Renaissance Dam to allow more of the Nile’s water to flow down to Egypt Option 4: Support the use of agricultural fertilisers by lowering the price of farm chemicals
COASTAL LANDSCAPES 4: "Sand dunes and salty air"
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COASTAL LANDSCAPES 4: "Sand dunes and salty air"

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Powerpoint covering spit formation, using Spurn as a Case Study Starter: simple (revision) sorting activity to sequence weathering, erosion, transportation and deposition Main activities:YouTube videos and a mystery activity to find out how Spurn Head has formed. Pupils use mystery clues to complete and annotate a base map of southern Holderness and the Humber Estuary. Mini-plenary to recognise associated landforms in aerial photos Second part uses bespoke, high tech (:D) series of diagrams (an animation if you click your mouse quickly enough!) which show why the point of the spit hooks (the role of secondary winds and wave refraction) Final part gets pupils to sketch and annotate diagrams of Marram and Glasswort to show how dune and salt marsh plants and habitats are interdependent. Differentiated question... 1-3: Describe how salt marshes and sand dunes are held in position by plants 4-6: Why are salt marsh and sand dune environments natural sea defences? 7-9: What could happen to the Humber Estuary if the vegetation at Spurn Head is not protected? Plenary: the 250 year cycle of spit formation and destruction at the mouth of the Humber Estuary
COASTAL LANDSCAPES 2: "Where's your head at?"
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COASTAL LANDSCAPES 2: "Where's your head at?"

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Powerpoint covering headlands and bays along the destructive Holderness coast Starter: use maps to locate Flamborough Head Main activities: sketch bird's eye view diagrams showing before and after erosion has affected a discordant coastline. Followed by a differentiated question: 1-3: How do headlands and bays form? 4-6: What role have chalk and boulder clay played in the formation of Flamborough Head? 7-9: What is wave refraction and how has it affected the Flamborough landscape? Second part gets pupils to annotate a diagram to show the sequence of cave-arch-stack formation using a series of mixed-up pieces of info (so can be done as a card sort or a mystery). Class then feeds back verbally by responding to a series of images and questions Third part: pupils work together to find advantages and disadvantages of headlands and bays using clues from a large scale OS map Plenary: pupils recap learning by describing and explaining features seen in a photo of the chalk at Flamborough
COASTAL LANDSCAPES 3: "Say hello, wave goodbye"
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COASTAL LANDSCAPES 3: "Say hello, wave goodbye"

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Powerpoint looking at erosion and transportation along Holderness Starter: the properties of powerful waves, including fetch Main activities: map work to measure the fetch from Holderness to various coasts of the North Sea. Then radar diagrams are introduced, using a wind rose as an example followed by the pupils constructing a radar to show dominant wave patterns. Then the link between the UK's SW prevailing wind and how it causes NNE dominant waves. Differentiated question... 1-3: What makes a sea wave powerful? 4-6: Explain why North Sea waves can be powerful and damaging 7-9: Refer to data which suggests that Holderness is threatened by powerful waves Second part gets pupils to draw and label diagrams to compare the features of constructive and destructive waves. They are then asked to assess photos of Holderness to decide which type of wave is affecting that coastline. Third part looks at the properties of boulder clay and why that soft geology is a problem. Differentiated question: 1-3: Why are the caravan owners worried about the erosion of the cliffs at Hornsea? 4-6: Explain why erosion of the boulder clay is a problem for Holderness 7-9: Explain why the erosion of boulder clay is an economic problem for Holderness businesses Plenary: pupils are asked to show how they think a typical wave moves, then are shown an animation that describes the circular motion of real wave patterns
COASTAL LANDSCAPES 1: "Little by little and stone by stone"
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COASTAL LANDSCAPES 1: "Little by little and stone by stone"

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Powerpoint introducing Holderness as a Case Study for coastal processes Starter: use maps to locate Holderness Main activities: comparison of the properties of chalk (through a memorisation activity and differentiated question) and boulder clay (pupils learn one fact then swap info to answer... What is boulder clay? Where did it come from? How did it get to Yorkshire? What has it got to do with our lesson about coastal landscapes? Second part gets pupils to draw a sketch map of Holderness then to annotate features that could be lost if erosion continues (using info researched from the internet) Differentiated question: 1-3: Why are there weaknesses found in chalk? 4-6: Why is Flamborough Head prone to erosion? 7-9: What are the geological reasons for the faults found in the chalk at Flamborough Head? Plenary shows the wide range of origins for sediment found along Holderness
COASTAL LANDSCAPES SDME
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COASTAL LANDSCAPES SDME

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40 mark SDME assessment in the form of a Powerpoint with associated resources Background: Why does Holderness suffer from severe coastal erosion? What are the advantages and disadvantages of halting erosion? Options: Why has hard engineering used to defend Hornsea? Why is soft engineering gaining popularity? Decision: Do nothing, retreat the line, hold the line or advance the line
Climate Change 8: "THE UK’S FUTURE CLIMATE"
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Climate Change 8: "THE UK’S FUTURE CLIMATE"

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Powerpoint and worksheets about the future effects of climate change on the British Isles Starter looks at 'The Day After Tomorrow' and the idea of a climate tipping point The main part of the lesson is a role play/debate about the future climate and the positive vs negative effects on UK life. Roles are related to government, industry, tourism, older people, wildlife trusts and farming. the role play is concluded by a written answer to the hypothesis: "Climate change will be bad for the United Kingdom". Plenary shows how milder winters are allowing exotic animals to survive in the UK
SDMEs
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SDMEs

6 Resources
Sustainable Decision Making Exercises: coasts, Nigeria, climate change, San Francisco...
Rivers
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Rivers

8 Resources
Upper, middle, lower stages of the River Tay
Hazards 4: "KATRINA'S EFFECTS"
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Hazards 4: "KATRINA'S EFFECTS"

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Powerpoint and worksheets about the effects of Hurricane Katrina. First part deals with levees and subsidence with a differentiated question. Second part looks at social, economic and environmental effects which are sorted and then used to write a newspaper article. Links to videos included.