Drama teaching resources

Resources and ideas for drama, written by teachers to support teaching and learning

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Fun Class Assembly  Ancient 'Greeks Got Talent!'

Fun Class Assembly Ancient 'Greeks Got Talent!'

Just finished this assembly with my Y5 class, it went so well and they loved it. It involves an 'X factor' style show where each Greek god auditions to be king of the gods, whilst telling the audience a little bit about the Ancient Greeks. It involves throwing confetti at the audience, a dance routine to music from Disney's Hercules, and a boy dressing up as Cheryl Cole....if you want. Adapt and use as you want. Enjoy.

By koolkat123uk

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KS3 Drama: 'Skellig' - Full Scheme (14 lessons) with all resources and powerpoints

KS3 Drama: 'Skellig' - Full Scheme (14 lessons) with all resources and powerpoints

This is a 14 lesson resource for teaching the play version of the novel 'Skellig' by David Almond. You will need a class set of this script to be able to teach this unit. All lessons have a detailed powerpoint, differentiated resources with AGT stretch and challenge. Lesson handouts and homework sheets are also provided. This lesson is suitable for Year 7 or 8 and serves as an excellent introduction to Physical theatre, surrealism, text-work and monologue. All resources are in word/ppt format, allowing for your amendments.

By corblimeyguvnor

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM (a triangle puzzle)

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM (a triangle puzzle)

In this co-operative review activity, students who have studied A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM match the texts on the edges of sixteen triangles to reconstitute the following quotes:Sleep, that sometimes shuts up sorrow’s eye, seal me awhile from mine own company.Lord, what fools these mortals be!If we shadows have offended, think but this, and all is mended, that you have but slumbered here while these visions did appear.The course of true love never did run smooth.Things base and vile, holding no quantity, Love can transpose to form and dignity.Never harm, nor spell nor charm, come our lovely lady nigh.The best in this kind are but shadows, and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend them.Thus have I, Wall, my part dischargèd so. And, being done, thus Wall away doth go.Come, blade, my breast imbrue. And, farewell, friends. Thus Thisbe ends. Adieu.Hang off, thou cat, thou burr! Vile thing, let loose.In the temple, by and by, with us, these couples shall eternally be knit.The lunatic, the lover, and the poet are of imagination all compact.Never anything can be amiss when simpleness and duty tender it.We cannot fight for love, as men may do; we should be wooed and were not made to woo.When in that moment, so it came to pass, Titania waked and straightway loved an ass. Sleep, that sometimes shuts up sorrow’s eye, seal me awhile from mine own company.Am not I Hermia? Are not you Lysander? I am as fair now as I was erewhile.

By Carlav

THE TEMPEST (a triangle puzzle)

THE TEMPEST (a triangle puzzle)

In this co-operative review activity, students who have studied THE TEMPEST match the texts on the edges of sixteen triangles to reconstitute the following quotes:Good wombs have borne bad sons.Hell is empty and all the devils are here.You taught me language, and my profit on't is, I know how to curse. But this swift business I must uneasy make, lest too light winning make the prize light. The wills above be done but I would fain die a dry death. I’ll rack thee with old cramps, fill all thy bones with aches. My library was dukedom large enough. Misery acquaints a man with strange bed-fellows. There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple. It was mine art, when I arrived and heard thee, that made gape the pine and let thee out. We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep. How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, that has such people in’t!The strongest oaths are straw to the fire i' the blood. He that dies pays all debts.Now I will believe that there are unicorns. What have we here? A man or a fish?

By Carlav

Differentiation in Drama Powerpoint

Differentiation in Drama Powerpoint

A Powerpoint with 6 slides you can use and adapt to meet the needs of your class. Split the group into 3: Group A (High ability)/ Group B (Mid ability) and Group C (Low ability). This will help an observer and help the students see themselves how they can make Good and Outstanding Progress in the lesson. Hope it's helpful!

By matthewcoe

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St. George's Day Assembly or Class Play

St. George's Day Assembly or Class Play

St. George's Day Assembly or Class PlayWhat on earth could the queen of England, our narrator alias Beefeater/guard of the Tower of London and the Artful Dodger have in common? Read on to find out what 'Twist' turns the Artful Dodger into Sir Artful Dodger!Cast size: 25 but easily adjusted up or down Duration: Around 20 minutes (depending on how much music is used)The focus of this play is London. Time constraints meant I just touched on England's history - events and people. I have addressed this 'shortfall' in the collection of guided reading scripts (available separately). Sample Text(Enter Sir Winston Churchill, smoking a pipe)Narrator: Ah, Sir Winston Churchill! Thank goodness. You pulled us through that Second World War - can you help me deal with this group of .. of ... super-women?Sir Winston Churchill: What? This lot? Leave it to me!Music 5 Who Do you Think You Are - Spice Girls(Spice Girls sing and make threatening gestures toward Sir Winston Churchill, who cowers and runs off stage)Narrator: (Aside) Hmm. Time for a different kind of ‘Help!" (Turning to Spice Girls) Hey girls, here come the Beatles!Spice Girls: (Together) Beetles? Did someone say, beetles?(All Spice Girls scream and run off stage)Music 6 Help - Beatles(Beatles stride on, singing Help!)Narrator: OK! That's probably as much help as I need! Thank you, boys!Beatles: (Together) No probs!(Exit Beatles)Narrator: So. Enough of this frivolity! Back to the serious stuff! Take my job at the Tower, for example(Queen Elizabeth runs back onto stage, in state of total panic)Narrator: Your Majesty! Whatever is the matter? Don't tell me you spilt your tea?Queen Eliz: (Gasping) Haven't you heard?Music 7 London Bridge is Falling Down(Cast sings first verse)Narrator: But that was around one thousand years ago, Your Majesty! It has been rebuilt several times since then!Queen Eliz: No! No! It's not that I'm worried about!Narrator: Oh no! Don't tell me the Thames Barrier has failed?Queen Eliz: What? The world's largest movable flood barrier? Of course not!Narrator: So. Has Buckingham Palace been burgled?Music 8 They're Changing Guards At Buckingham Palace(Cast sings first verse, as two guards in uniform march up and down)Queen Eliz: What? With my fine guards to keep us safe? I don't think so!Narrator: (Gasping) Don't tell me St. Paul's Cathedral has burnt to the ground again?Queen Eliz: (Sighing in exasperation) No. Our fire service has improved a little since that Great Fire of London!

By suesplays

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St. George's Day Set of 5 Guided Reading Plays on England

St. George's Day Set of 5 Guided Reading Plays on England

St. George's Day Set of 5 Guided Reading Plays on England:1. St. George Meets Robin Hood2. A Brief History of the English Monarchy3. Famous People4. England's Geography and 'Places'5. English CustomsThis set of 5 plays, with 6 speakers each, plus quizzes, was written in celebration of St. George's Day. Narrated in all 5 plays by St. George himself, .... with a little help from Robin Hood! Sample Texts:Play 1 St. George meets ... Robin HoodSt. George: Ah Robin! Thank you so much for joining me this morning. I trust you have been given an explanation as to why you are here?Robin Hood: Indeed. And may I say, it is an honour to fulfill such a role. That is, to one such as yourself.Play 2St. George: Please! A little respect for the dead! OK so Henry VIII wouldn't be most women's number one choice husbandRobin: Not if they valued their necks!St. George: But his daughter certainly made up for his lack of heart!Elizabeth I: Good Queen Bess! That's what they called me!Play 3Queen Eliz: Of course not! It was those other great qualities - of standing up for what you believed inSt. George: Like when I stood up for my faith, even though it cost me my life.Churchill: "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak.."Shakespeare: (Interrupting) "Friends, Romans and countrymen, lend me your ears .."Lennon: Sadly that Emperor Diocletian didn't lend his or he wouldn't have had you beheaded ...Play 4St. George: But before we visit any of these places, let us quickly look at where England itself is.Robin: That's easy! South of Scotland and East of Wales!Play 5Weatherman: Indeed. Every cloud has a silver lining!St. George: Really?Robin: Just an old English proverb. We have lots of those

By suesplays

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St. George's Day drama and poetry bundle

St. George's Day drama and poetry bundle

An assembly on England in celebration of St. George's Day; plus a set of five Guided Reading Scripts (plus quizzes) with 6 speakers each; plus St. George's Day Poem. Whole package - 3 products for price of one! Enjoy!

By suesplays

Greek Theatre PPT and Handout

Greek Theatre PPT and Handout

A 37 Page PPT with accompanying 5 page handout for students.Covers a lots of content , including;The background to Theatre, The Great Spring Festival, The Theatre (Venues), The layout of a theatre - Orchestra, Parados, Skene, Altar, Seating, The audience, Sound effects, Special effects, Props, The Chorus, The Actors /Performers, Costumes, Masks, How plays were chosen (the Competition). Very Visual with lots of images and diagrams.A handout for students is included in the Zip folder so they can view the PPT without having to write down all content.Suitable for Junior to Senior years studying Ancient Greece or a Drama Class

By teen91113

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International Children's Book Day Assembly or Class Play

International Children's Book Day Assembly or Class Play

International Children's Book Day Assembly or Class PlayThis script was written in celebration of International Children's Book Day April 2nd 2017 including characters from Horrid Henry, Peter Pan, The Gruffalo, Charlotte's Web, Captain Underpants, Matilda, The Tales of Narnia, Alice in Wonderland and The Very Hungry Caterpillar. NB This is the same script as World Book Day Assembly but adapted to International Children's Book Day.Cast of 30 (easily adapted up or down)Duration: Around 20 minutes not including music suggestionsSample Text:Narrator: Thank you! Of course there is so much to celebrate in the world of literature! All those wonderful inspirational characters!(Enter Horrid Henry, scowling)Horrid Henry: Dah! I suppose you’ve got a whole line up of squeaky clean characters for us today? Just got one word to say to that – BORING!Narrator: And you are? (Pauses) Oh, don’t tell me – Horrid Henry! (Aside to Audience) A shame he had to start us off today! Definitely not one of our more likeable characters! (To Henry) Now, if you don’t mind, I do have a lot of other, shall we say ‘more wholesome characters’ to introduce!Horrid Henry: (Scowling) Please yourself!(Exit Horrid Henry, giving exaggerated ‘yawns’)Narrator: (To Audience) Oh dear! Sorry about that! Let’s see if we can ‘raise the bar’ a little!(Peter Pan ‘flies’ onto the stage)Narrator: Ah! Peter Pan! How nice to meet you!Peter Pan: The pleasure is all mine!(Enter Wendy and Tinkerbell)Peter Pan: I’d like you to meetWendy: (Curtseying) Wendy (looking at Peter Pan adoringly) Darling!Tinkerbell: (Trying to ‘swoosh’ Wendy out of the way) And Peter’s favourite, Tinkerbell!Peter Pan: (Laughing) Now, now Tinkerbell! We have spoken about that jealousy thing!(Tinkerbell pulls a face, sulking)Wendy: Oh but she’s so adorable! You can’t be cross with her for long!(Enter Horrid Henry)Horrid Henry: What was I saying about those yukky sugary-sweet characters? Time to introduce some more interesting ones!(Horrid Henry beckons to Captain Cook and Crocodile)(Enter Captain Cook and Crocodile, snapping at Narrator’s heels)Narrator: (Angrily) Who let this beast on here? (Glaring at Horrid Henry) Oh I might have known you’d be up to no good!

By suesplays

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Bundle of playscripts linked to IPC units

Bundle of playscripts linked to IPC units

A bundle of 5 primary playscripts, which are all linked to International Primary Curriculum (IPC) units.These can be used alongside the unit's lessons, as an entry or exit point, for an assembly or as a larger class show.All scripts come complete with any associated music, sound effects, supporting resources and production notes.The IPC units covered are:*Mission to Mars*Making the News*Gateways to the World*The Time Tunnel*Let's CelebrateAs well as linking directly to these units, the scripts can also be used for general school shows and productions.

By goldtopfox

TWELFTH NIGHT (A triangle puzzle)

TWELFTH NIGHT (A triangle puzzle)

In this co-operative review activity, students who have studied TWELFTH NIGHT match the texts on the edges of sixteen triangles to reconstitute the following quotes:Oh Time, thou must untangle this, not I. It is too hard a knot for me t'untie! She did commend my yellow stockings of late, she did praise my leg, being cross-gartered.O, had I but followed the arts! Many a good hanging prevents a bad marriage.If music be the food of love, play on.Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon ‘em.This fellow is wise enough to play the fool and to do that well craves a kind of wit. Love sought is good, but giv'n unsought is better. If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction. This youth that you see here I snatch'd one half out of the jaws of death. Or I am mad, or else this is a dream.I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you.Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.Foolery, sir, does walk about the orb like the sun, it shines everywhere. One face, one voice, one habit, and two persons, a natural perspective that is and is not!

By Carlav

An Inspector Calls Lessons

An Inspector Calls Lessons

A powerpoint used to work through the J.B Priestley play 'An Inspector Calls'.Readies students for their Literature GCSE exams.Prescripted reading sections and focus questions.Key themes and ideas to consider throughout.

By mp06

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Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class Play

Ancient Greek Myths Tale of Two Spinners Assembly or Class PlayThis class play can be used as an assembly (for performance) or as a class play, to be read within the classroom. It is part of a set of scripts written on the Ancient Greek Myths which includes Guided Reading scripts plus quizzes. The poem - The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt - is included in the text.Cast of 30 - easily adaptable up or downDuration - around 10 - 15 minutesSample Text:Narrator: Now, that’s better.(Ushering Incey Wincey Spider and Little Miss Muffet back to their seats) (To audience) You see how ridiculous this fear of spiders is? What do they call it? Arachn(Enter Arachne, scuttling on in spider costume)Arachne: Someone mention my name?Narrator: Ah! You’d be Arachne! As in Arachnophobia?Arachne: Well, I have no fear of spiders. I just am one! All thanks to(Enter Athene)Athene: Me!Arachne: Wretched goddess!(Athene scowls and raises her hand)Athene: (Menacingly) I’d be very careful what you say, if I were you Arachne! That tongue of yours has already got you into a whole heap of trouble!Arachne: (Gesturing at the spider outfit) Oh you mean this? Just because I said I was a better spinner than you!Athene: Foolish girl! What arrogance! You had to be punished!Arachne: That wasn’t quite the only reason I got punished, was it?Narrator: I’d say that was ample reason! Definitely too big for her boots, this one!Arachne: (Wailing) But I was brilliant at my craft.Athene: And didn’t you know it! You had to be taken down a peg or two.

By suesplays

Romeo and Juliet: A Topic Overview

Romeo and Juliet: A Topic Overview

Romeo and Juliet: A Topic OverviewThis is a hand drawn overview designed to be used with William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. It covers all areas of the primary curriculum and can be sued across Key Stage 2.

By ChrisWat

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Hand Drawn Topic Overviews

Hand Drawn Topic Overviews

Here are several hand drawn topic overviews for topics:Charlie and the Chocolate FactoryMortal EnginesMillionsRomeo and JulietDawn Wind (The Saxons)Street Child (Victorians)The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe ( WWII)

By ChrisWat

Flash Mobs

Flash Mobs

Includes notes on Flashmobs, along with a practical assessment and theoretical assessment.

By archer25

Hamlet (a triangle puzzle)

Hamlet (a triangle puzzle)

In this co-operative review activity, students who have studied Hamlet are asked to match the text on the edges of sixteen triangles to reconstitute the following quotes:- This above all: to thine own self be true.- There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. - Though this be madness, yet there is method in’t.- I must be cruel only to be kind.- To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream . . . - There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.- Brevity is the soul of wit. - I must be cruel only to be kind; thus bad begins, and worse remains behind.- Get thee to a nunnery. - The lady doth protest too much, methinks. - O that this too too solid flesh would melt …- Good night, sweet prince, and flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!- When sorrows come, they come not single spies but in battalions.- Madness in great ones must not unwatched go.- What a piece of work is a man!- One may smile and smile and be a villain. - Happy in that we are not overhappy; on Fortune's cap we are not the very button.- Neither a borrower nor a lender be: for loan oft loses both itself and friend.

By Carlav

Structuring an Analytical Essay for Macbeth

Structuring an Analytical Essay for Macbeth

Targeted at KS4 pupils, the adaptable writing frame provides pupils with a guided structure (with arrows) about how they can build a convincing analytical argument through each sentence. Each sentence is connected with an arrow that shows pupils how their analytical response follows a structure; in following the arrows pupils realize how they must begin with a topic sentence to evidence, to analysis then the reader's response and concluding the writer's intentions. The structure is modeled and pupils are given opportunities to follow the structure and analyse alternative extracts independently for the entire lesson. This works great in group work and independent tasks that lead to presentations. The analytical structure is adaptable to different texts and provides a great scaffold for all analytical writing tasks.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Class, Capitalism and Socialism in An Inspector Calls

Class, Capitalism and Socialism in An Inspector Calls

Targeted at low ability GCSE pupils, this adaptable PowerPoint provides an insightful platform that enables pupils to explore how class, capitalism and socialism are embodied by the characters. In providing specific extracts, differentiated questioning and comprehension checks before assessing pupils, the PowerPoint is widely accessible for diverse classes.

By deepavali_sehgal1

The Controversy of Class in An Inspector Calls

The Controversy of Class in An Inspector Calls

Targeted at low ability GCSE pupils, this adaptable PowerPoint provides an insightful platform that enables pupils to explore the controversial nature of class in An Inspector Calls by recognising how this unjustifiably leads to segregation. In providing specific extracts, differentiated questioning and comprehension checks before assessing pupils, the PowerPoint is widely accessible for diverse classes.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Power in Macbeth

Power in Macbeth

Targeted at mixed ability GCSE pupils, this insightful PowerPoint enables pupils to explore how Shakespeare presents how power ironically can lead to greed, alienation and downfall.With relevant quotes from the text, differentiated questions and writing scaffolds, by the end of the lesson pupils can analyse how Shakespeare presents power through Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Motif of Sleep in Macbeth

Motif of Sleep in Macbeth

Targeted at mixed ability GCSE pupils, this adaptable resource enables pupils to recognise how sleep is used as a motif of guilt in Macbeth. Within the resource are suitable questions, extracts from the play, assessments and scaffolds that usefully support and promote independent learning.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Gothic Writing - Semi-colons and 'show' don't tell.

Gothic Writing - Semi-colons and 'show' don't tell.

Targeted at mixed ability KS3 pupils, this flexible resource challenges pupils to use semi-colons in order to create contrasting portrayals of their characters. In creating opposing portrayals of their character on either side of the semi-colon, pupils can create interesting and original descriptive writing.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Freytag's pyramid in Macbeth

Freytag's pyramid in Macbeth

Targeted at mixed ability GCSE pupils, this adaptable resource enables pupils to explain how Shakespeare follows Freytag's five-act structure in order to intensify and add fluidity to the play. Through accessible models and assessments, pupils begin to discuss the value of the 'turning point' in the play.

By deepavali_sehgal1