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Bespoke ELA

The Bespoke ELA Classroom is an online resource center for secondary curriculum solutions. I've always had a connection to the written word through songwriting, screenwriting, and teaching English. I started Bespoke ELA after teaching high school for 10+ years in Dallas, Chicago, and New York City because I wanted to share skills-driven resources with other teachers to meet the needs of students from all walks of life. In my spare time, a little girl and two pups like to call me "mom."

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The Bespoke ELA Classroom is an online resource center for secondary curriculum solutions. I've always had a connection to the written word through songwriting, screenwriting, and teaching English. I started Bespoke ELA after teaching high school for 10+ years in Dallas, Chicago, and New York City because I wanted to share skills-driven resources with other teachers to meet the needs of students from all walks of life. In my spare time, a little girl and two pups like to call me "mom."
Adjectives Vocabulary List for Describing Characters
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Adjectives Vocabulary List for Describing Characters

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A central part of literary analysis involves analyzing the characters of a piece of literature. I have found that character analysis serves as an excellent means of increasing students' vocabulary. Here, I have compiled a list of adjectives (many of them SAT-level words) that can be used to describe a character. Students can select words from this list and use them to analyze and describe characters either in discussion or in writing. This list will help students to push beyond their current vocabulary by introducing them to new words that will not only help their analysis in class but simultaneously prepare them for the SAT! Words on this list have been categorized according to a common meaning, which will help students take risks in identifying potential new words and taking risks with new vocabulary. Note-- This is an excellent tool for English Language Learners as well!
Characterization & Point of View:  A Mini-lesson on Getting into a Character's Mind
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Characterization & Point of View: A Mini-lesson on Getting into a Character's Mind

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This listing is for a characterization activity entitled "Mind Jump" in which students analyze how point of view affects characterization. This mini-lesson is part of the Mega Characterization Bundle of over 15 characterization mini-lessons that get your students working with all literary devices and techniques. You can find it listed separately in our store. Bundle and save over $15.00! For this mini-lesson: "Mind Jump" Task To write from the point of view of characters from a piece of literature in order to assess how point of view shapes characterization Objectives To understand what motivates characters to take action To develop criteria for analyzing character To assess comprehension of character development across a text Common Core Standards R1, 3, 6, 11/ W1-4, 10/ L1-3 Instructions Understanding a character’s point of view is necessary in determining a character’s motivation to take action. In this activity, students will explore the point of view of a specific character and attempt to write from that character’s perspective. After completing the “Mind Jump” Activity, students can complete the following post activities that are also included: the “Mind Jump” Pair Discussion, the “Mind Jump” Character Chart, and/or the “Mind Jump” Post Write-up in order to analyze the traits of the character from the initial “Mind Jump” Lead Activity.
Shakespearean Tragedy and Aristotle's Poetics: Close Reading, Debate, & MORE
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Shakespearean Tragedy and Aristotle's Poetics: Close Reading, Debate, & MORE

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Task: To analyze Shakespeare’s work in terms of Aristotle’s literary theories from Poetics Objectives: To develop criteria for analyzing literary elements To support analysis with textual evidence To use rhetorical skills for constructing and supporting oral and written arguments To construct an effective argument supported with logical reasoning and textual evidence To apply literary theories to other texts To close read a text for main ideas Common Core Standards: R1, 3, 6, 11/ W1, 2, 4, 10/ SL 1, 3, 4, 6/ L1-3 Instructions: Aristotle’s literary theories have helped to set the precedent for what determines “high quality” literature. Writers either follow his methods, or they rebel against them. While it is not known if Shakespeare read or studied Aristotle’s Poetics, it is a fascinating study to apply Aristotle’s theories to Shakespeare’s work in order to observe how Shakespeare innovated new concepts for drama. In this unit, students will: Complete the pre-reading strategy in order to define key terms found in Aristotle’s Poetics. Close read excerpts from Poetics and answer comprehension/discussion questions for each section. Note that students may answer the questions in terms of one, single Shakespearean tragedy but may reference any other plays they may have read. Map out the plot of at least one Shakespearean Tragedy and identify examples of key terms from Aristotle’s Poetics. Debate whether or not Shakespeare follows Aristotle’s literary theories. Synthesize their conclusions in a post-debate writeup. This unit contains SIX excerpts from Aristotle’s Poetics for students to close read. Each excerpt contains a few close reading/ discussion questions in order to both comprehend Aristotle’s main ideas as well as apply them to Shakespeare’s works. There are a few different ways to use these excerpts in your classes: 1. Have students read all six excerpts and discuss the questions included in each one. 2. Divide students into groups and assign each group 1-2 excerpts to close read. 3. Students can then present their findings to the class, and the whole class can discuss the application questions included. 4. Use the “Overview of Aristotle’s Poetics” handout included here and have students close read only a couple of the excerpts instead of all six. For the remaining activities, students can focus on a single Shakespearean tragedy of your choice, or allow students to use evidence from multiple plays as best fits your curriculum reading list, their reading experiences, and level of course difficulty. This is an excellent addition to any Shakespeare unit and will deepen the complexity of students' interaction with tragedy.
BEOWULF Anticipation Guide on Heroism
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BEOWULF Anticipation Guide on Heroism

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This anticipation guide asks students to consider the modern-day, American concept of heroism. Students will brainstorm examples of heroism in today’s world as a means of studying the epic hero and the Anglo-Saxon concept of heroism. This activity establishes student anticipation of reading the poem Beowulf and provides an interesting platform for class discussion and debate. This guide is included in my MEGA Beowulf Bundle, which includes 25 lessons and activities to take your Beowulf unit to the next level! Find the entire bundle in our store, sold separately. BUNDLE AND SAVE!
Back to School Icebreakers for the Secondary Classroom
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Back to School Icebreakers for the Secondary Classroom

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This packet contains 10+ unique, creative, and fun icebreakers to use with your students at the beginning of the school year. They include: 1. Candy fun! 2. Pass the hat 3. What's in your pocket? 4. Group Challenge 5. Letter Writing 6. Desk Gallery Walk 7. Rename Thyself 8. Hypothetical Situations 9. Signature Challenge 10. Alphabet Soup These activities are sure to get your students interested in your class from DAY ONE! They will help you get to know your students and also help your students to begin to form bonds within the classroom that will create an effective classroom environment.
BEOWULF Creative Writing Assignments
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BEOWULF Creative Writing Assignments

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Included here are three popular creative writing assignments to accompany a unit on Beowulf. Beowulf Kenning Activity a. In this activity, students try their hand at creating modern-day kennings to share with the class. Students have fun being creative with kennings! Anglo-Saxon Boast Writing Assignment a. This assignment asks students to create a poetic boast modeled after that of Beowulf in the epic poem. Students must integrate devices such as hyperbole, alliteration, and kennings into a boast about their accomplishments. Then, students are to write a paragraph explanation of the role boasting plays in the poem using at least two quotations from the text. Students have great fun sharing their boasts and also comparing/ contrasting theirs to that of Beowulf's. This is a great activity to get students involved in the poem in an interactive way! Beowulf Comic Book Project a. This Beowulf project uses the structure of the comic book to assess student understanding of the literary elements in Beowulf, Anglo-Saxon culture, and reading/writing/collaboration skills. Included here is the project assignment along with a Common Core aligned rubric. This is a great project to tap into student motivation in a fun, collaborative, engaging way that will simultaneously target reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. All three creative writing tasks are included in my MEGA BEOWULF BUNDLE (25 activities and lessons with answer keys included!) You can find the ENTIRE bundle in our store, sold separately. BUNDLE AND SAVE!
Macbeth Debate Activity: Constructing Oral and Written Arguments
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Macbeth Debate Activity: Constructing Oral and Written Arguments

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In this set of debate activities by Bespoke ELA, students will participate in a series of debates in response to "yes/no" questions about Shakespeare's play Macbeth. There are 10 debate questions in all. Students will collect evidence to support both sides of the argument and then debate a side with their peers in order to practice constructing logical arguments supported by textual evidence. Each debate chart is followed by an argumentative writing assignment as a culmination of the class debate. The teacher page included gives some suggestions for how to run a debate in your classroom, and I have also included my Debate Guide & Rubric for scoring your students' participation. These debate activities are excellent starter activities for an essay on Macbeth. Use them to facilitate the writing process and/or have students create "oral argument" presentations in which they share their interpretations with the class.
Analyzing Character Motivation:  A Literary Analysis Mini-lesson
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Analyzing Character Motivation: A Literary Analysis Mini-lesson

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This listing is for a characterization activity entitled "Motivation Machine" in which students analyze how a character's motivations reveal character traits. This mini-lesson is part of the Mega Characterization Bundle of over 15 characterization mini-lessons that get your students working with all literary devices and techniques. You can find it listed separately in our store. Bundle and save over $15.00! For this mini-lesson: "Motivation Machine" Task To analyze the relationship between character motivation and plot Objectives To develop criteria for analyzing character To assess comprehension of character development across a text To support analysis with textual evidence Common Core Standards R1-3, 6, 11/ W1-4, 10-11/ L1-3 Instructions In this set of activities, students will look at the relationship between character motivation and plot in order to observe how the protagonist’s desires create or drive the plot of the story. The “Motivation Machine” lead activity asks students to consider plot points that are organized according to character decisions. The questions on the “Motivation Machine” Activity follow the typical character motivation pattern as follows: 1. The character has a problem—wants something but cannot get it. 2. The character worsens the problem by making a mistake. 3. The character has to deal with the worsened problem and faces obstacles. 4. The character either solves the problem and gets what he/she wants or does not. After students complete the “Motivation Machine” activity, they can then complete the three follow-up activities: “Motivation Machine” Silent Swap “Motivation Machine” Consequences Chart “Motivation Machine” Analytical Paragraph In the Silent Swap, students swap the “Motivation Machine” activity three times and answer reflection questions independently in order to compare/contrast other students’ character analysis with their own. In the “Motivation Machine” Consequences Chart, students consider the cause/ effect relationship of a character’s motivation. In the Analytical Paragraph, students synthesize their findings into a writing task that responds to the question: “How does the protagonist’s motivation affect the plot of the story?” This activity will enable students to grasp how the protagonist creates the action of a story according to what he/she wants.
Abraham Lincoln's Thanksgiving Proclamation: A Rhetorical Analysis Activity
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Abraham Lincoln's Thanksgiving Proclamation: A Rhetorical Analysis Activity

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Product Description In this Thanksgiving activity by Bespoke ELA, students will study Lincoln's Thanksgiving Proclamations in order to assess the relationship between language and persuasion while targeting the Common Core. First, students will read an editorial from The New York Times in order to understand better the relationship between Abraham Lincoln and Thanksgiving. Then, they will analyze the rhetoric of Lincoln's two Thanksgiving Proclamations-- from 1863 and 1864. Thanksgiving became a national holiday as the result of the Civil War. While other presidents had called for a day of "thanksgiving," it was not nationalized as an American holiday until Lincoln saw the need to unite the nation as our country was being ravaged by war. The article from The New York Times also reveals how Thanksgiving had nothing to do with pilgrims and Indians but later became intertwined with the "Founders Day Celebration" of New England. Originally, Thanksgiving came from our leaders' desire to recognize progress in our country. This activity is an excellent Thanksgiving activity that targets non-fiction Common Core skills while also targeting close reading skills and rhetorical analysis. As a final step in this activity, students will write their very own Thanksgiving Proclamations including rhetorical devices and appeals to entreat their audience to adopt Thanksgiving using their own reasons to be thankful. Great activity for grades 9-12, including Honors and Advanced Placement. Answer Keys Included
Crafting the Introduction Paragraph for the Literary Analysis Essay
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Crafting the Introduction Paragraph for the Literary Analysis Essay

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This series of mini-lessons can also be found in our Mega Literary Analysis Essay Bundle, sold separately. The introduction paragraph is arguably one of the most important paragraphs in any essay. It makes the first impression and establishes the focused purpose for the essay. These mini-lessons show students how to go from the attention-grabber (or lead) to the focused thesis statement in an effective way using student examples. No unit on the literary analysis essay is complete without these mini-lessons that will help students set the purpose and direction for a piece of writing on interpreting a work of art.
30 MENTOR SENTENCES for Literary & Rhetorical Devices with Writing Revision
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30 MENTOR SENTENCES for Literary & Rhetorical Devices with Writing Revision

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This product is a POWER POINT that contains 30 MENTOR SENTENCES from famous classic writers to model key literary terms, rhetorical devices, and syntactical structures for students. For each sentence, students are to: 1. Copy the sentence. 2. Make observations about the sentence. 3. Imitate the sentence. 4. Learn about literary devices. 5. Answer questions about how the devices are used for rhetorical and literary effect. 6. Revise an essay with a new sentence modeled after that of the famous writer. 7. Reflect back on the new added sentence. 8. Share with a partner. These MENTOR SENTENCE activities will take students through the process of not only using literary and rhetorical devices in action but will integrate them into writing workshop as mini-lessons for making their writing more powerful. This POWER POINT is fully editable and is suitable for Advanced Placement and modifiable for other levels of HIGH SCHOOL English. ========================== Devices included in this set include: Parallel Structure Antithesis Anaphora Asyndeton Parataxis Polysyndeton Paradox Irony Chiasmus Balanced Sentence Epistrophe Rule of Three Tricolon Analogy Personification Metaphor Simile Metonymy Synecdoche Loose Sentence Hypotaxis Apostrophe Allusion Alliteration Consonance Assonance Rhetorical Question Litotes The Dash Hyperbole Understatement Semi-colon Colon Repetition Contrast Periodic Sentence Simple Sentence Amplification Antimetabole Anadiplosis Balanced Sentence Zeugma Epithet Epanalepsis PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS ZIP FILE CONTAINS THREE VERSIONS OF THIS PRODUCT. IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO EMBED FONTS INTO POWER POINT WITH MAC, SO I HAVE INCLUDED A .PDF VERSION AND AN UNEDITABLE .PNG VERSION (ON POWER POINT) THAT YOU CAN USE TO PRESERVE THE ORIGINAL FONTS AS DESIGNED. THIS FILE ALSO INCLUDES THE ORIGINAL POWER POINT THAT IS EDITABLE BUT WILL OPEN WITH DEFAULT FONTS FOR POWER POINT UNLESS YOU OWN THE SAME FONTS AS IN THE PRESENTATION.
The Literary Analysis 10-POINT RUBRIC for Clarity and Success
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The Literary Analysis 10-POINT RUBRIC for Clarity and Success

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This is a rubric for a Literary Analysis that breaks down the points into 10 specific skills, including introduction/ conclusion paragraphs, thesis, topic sentences, textual evidence, analysis, style, organization, grammar, MLA, and following directions. I have assigned point values to each of the skills (which you can change according to your students' needs). This rubric is very comprehensive and provides explicit feedback for revision purposes without your having to write substantial notes throughout the essay-- all you need to do is circle away. This is an excellent rubric that you can adapt for your classroom purposes. Side note: As a rule in my classroom, I approach writing as an ongoing process. That means that after students turn in the "final draft," I allow my students to revise/ rewrite and resubmit the essay for a maximum of half the points back to 100. That means, if their initial score was a 70, for example, they can revise/rewrite and resubmit for a MAXIMUM score of an 85. I know this sounds very tedious; however, I give out explicit directions for resubmission, and any deviation from those directions disqualifies the essay for resubmission. Mainly, I require that students turn in the original essay with original rubric and the new, revised copy with all new changes highlighted. This way, I can simply check to see if they revised/ rewrote sections that needed further attention. In this way, my grading philosophy entails that I grade for quality on the first submission and effort on the second revision. It is in this way that I can communicate to my students that writing is a skill and an art that takes practice and that I do not expect perfection (because who's perfect?); instead, I expect effort, and I expect growth. Give it a try and see what happens!
Nonfiction: Analyzing Tone and Bias in the Media Stories of Jack the Ripper
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Nonfiction: Analyzing Tone and Bias in the Media Stories of Jack the Ripper

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Jack the Ripper. One of the most notorious serial killers of all time. And he was never caught. There are over 100 theories about his identity. If you're looking for a high-interest nonfiction topic to get your students interested in analyzing nonfiction, this is it! This activity has two parts. The first parts takes students through an exercise of identifying tone in a news article written about Jack the Ripper. There are four articles in this part of this lesson that all come from The London Times, late 1800s. (please note that all texts are in the public domain) Each article is followed by a series of three multiple-choice questions written using Common Core question stems. These questions will help students understand the overall message of each article and encourage them to read critically. Students are then to record examples of tone from the articles and label the tone accordingly. Identifying tone will help with part two of this activity series in which students begin to analyze sources for bias. In part two of this activity, students will assess a series of stories about Jack the Ripper all written on the exact same day, all about the exact same grisly discovery of two more female victims. By reading multiple sources on the same event, students will be able to compare/ contrast how each source represents the "truth." After assessing sources for bias, students will evaluate which source is more reliable and present their findings to the class. I have also included FIVE extension activities to use with your students after completing this activity in order to keep your students engaged with nonfiction. ***Please note that there are a couple of paragraphs in this collection that are quite graphic and may be inappropriate for some students. Please censor the articles as you see fit.*** Jack the Ripper is a topic that will keep your students intrigued from the very get-go!
Writer's Workshop Wrap-up Task Cards-- FREEBIE
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Writer's Workshop Wrap-up Task Cards-- FREEBIE

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These Task Cards by Bespoke ELA are to be used at the end of a Writer’s Workshop during the last ten minutes to emphasize with students that any part of the essay can be edited and revised at any time. The purpose of these Task Cards is to communicate to students that writing is a continual, recursive process, not a linear process. Students often ask if they are “allowed” to go back and change something about an essay draft. These Task Cards will help students see that they are, in fact, “allowed” change anything about their essays throughout the writing process. Allow students to select one of these cards and complete the revision or reflection task of their choice at the end of a writer’s workshop session. This will also enable students to take ownership of their own learning and writing. Included in this FREE bundle: 16 Task Cards Ppt. Version-- editable PNG Power Point Version PDF Version ============================================= You might also like: Literary Analysis MEGA BUNDLE 30 MENTOR SENTENCES for Literary & Rhetorical Devices with Writing Application Poetry Bundle: 20 Short Poems to Teach Rhetorical Relationships & Explication Macbeth Bundle: Supplementary Materials for Any Macbeth Unit Nonfiction Resource Bundle Nonfiction Practice with The Gettysburg Address Nonfiction Practice with The Declaration of Independence Nonfiction Practice with Alexander Hamilton Sample Essay Pack: TEN Literary Analysis Essays Argument Essay Revision Forms: TEN Activities for Success Grammar Editing Mini-lessons for Essay Writing Editing the Essay for "Academese" The Conclusion Paragraph for Literary Analysis Crafting Commentary for Literary Analysis Selecting & Organizing Textual Evidence for Literary Analysis Topic & Concluding Sentences for Literary Analysis The Body Paragraph for Essay Writing The Thesis Statement for Literary Analysis: SIX Mini-lessons for Success Blending Quotes Using the TCS Method The Literary Analysis 10-POINT RUBRIC The Introduction Paragraph for Literary Analysis
Characterization Through Subtext:  A Mini-lesson
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Characterization Through Subtext: A Mini-lesson

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This listing is for a characterization activity entitled "Subtext Submarine" in which students analyze how subtext reveals character traits. This mini-lesson is part of the Mega Characterization Bundle of over 15 characterization mini-lessons that get your students working with all literary devices and techniques. You can find it listed separately in our store. Bundle and save over $15.00! For this mini-lesson: Task To assess how subtext reveals character traits Objectives To develop criteria for analyzing character To assess comprehension of character development across a text To support analysis with textual evidence To use inference to analyze character To present findings to the class in an effective, organized, and compelling way To work effectively with others to produce a product Common Core Standards R1-4, 6, 10, 11/ W1, 2, 4, 10-11/ SL 1, 4, 6/ L1-6 Instructions Subtext is a difficult skill for students to comprehend because it requires students to look beyond what they see and to use their inference skills to draw conclusions about character. For this reason, I have developed the metaphor of the submarine to help students visualize this concept. In the “Subtext Submarine” activities that follow, students are introduced to the concept of subtext and then asked to apply that concept to character analysis. The Lead Activity contains an introduction to subtext using the metaphor of a submarine—the idea being that text exists on the surface (above the water), and subtext exists below the surface (under the water). Students are then asked to analyze a series of silly conversations for subtext and then to create their own. They will not only enjoy analyzing the silly conversations (“Ten Ways to Say NO!”) but also inventing their own (“Ten Ways to Say YES!”). The follow-up activities ask students to find examples of subtext in a piece of literature and explain how the subtext reveals character traits. Students can refer back to the list of Characterization Adjectives at the beginning of this packet in order to select appropriate academic vocabulary as they assign character traits to each example of subtext. Finally, students will then create a skit in which they use subtext to reveal character in order to synthesize their understanding of the concept. Once students have a grasp of the concept of subtext, they will enjoy working with it and using it to analyze character.
Personal Narrative Brainstorming Activity
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Personal Narrative Brainstorming Activity

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This PowerPoint activity takes students through a brainstorming exercise in which students are presented with various categories and quickly list memories/ thoughts that come to mind. At the end of the brainstorming exercise, students have a nice bank of ideas from which to select a personal narrative story topic. I typically have my students do this activity at the start of a personal narrative unit and then have them draft 3-5 different stories from their lists. This activity is an excellent, interactive activity that students will really enjoy. It is also great for college essay brainstorming to push students beyond writing cliche stories. Feel free to replace my own personal lists with memories of your own! This will help you bond with your students even more and also give them ideas of memories or thoughts to write down about themselves. Take the time to share as you move through each topic, and students will really get excited about writing the personal narrative essay!
Personal Narrative Essay/Memoir Revision Forms and Mini-lessons PACK
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Personal Narrative Essay/Memoir Revision Forms and Mini-lessons PACK

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This pack contains 11 different forms to use in conjunction with a Personal Narrative Unit. It includes mini-lessons on personal narrative skills such as: Show Not Tell Avoiding Cliches and Common Descriptions Writing Attention-Grabbing Hooks Crafting Memorable Conclusions Writer's Voice It also includes a self-revision form and three peer revision activities. This pack will help students write personal narrative essays that leave a lasting impression in the reader's mind.
Beowulf MEGA LESSON PLAN BUNDLE-- 25 Lessons & 108 Pages for Success!
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Beowulf MEGA LESSON PLAN BUNDLE-- 25 Lessons & 108 Pages for Success!

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In this mega Beowulf Bundle, you will find 25 lessons and activities that include very thorough answer keys with textual evidence where applicable to take your Beowulf unit to the next level. This bundle includes the following items: 1. Beowulf Anticipation Guide: Heroism 2. Beowulf Cultural Discovery: An Introduction to the Anglo-Saxons 3. Beowulf WebQuest and Wordle Poem 4. Anglo-Saxon History Notes 5. Anglo-Saxon History Quiz 6. Anglo-Saxon Values and Vices Chart 7. Beowulf Journal Prompts 8. Beowulf Reading and Discussion Questions 9. Beowulf Reading Checks 10. Beowulf “Connecting the Dots” Graphic Organizers 11. Beowulf vs. the Epic Hero Cycle 12. Beowulf Rhetoric Activity 13. Bias and Propaganda in Beowulf 14. Intertextuality Activity: Beowulf and Wilbur’s Poem 15. Beowulf and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen 16. Beowulf Agree/ Disagree Activity 17. Beowulf Debatable Statements Activity 18. Beowulf Essay Brainstorming Activity— Topics/ Themes Chart 19. Beowulf Essay Thesis Statements 20. Literary Criticism: “Subversive Female Power in Beowulf” 21. Beowulf Essay Prompts + Outline Form and Rubric 22. Beowulf Kenning Activity 23. Anglo-Saxon Boast Writing Assignment 24. Beowulf Comic Book Project 25. Beowulf Skills Application Test
BEOWULF:  Graphic Organizers for Reading Comprehension
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BEOWULF: Graphic Organizers for Reading Comprehension

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These graphic organizers are a nice supplementary item for a Beowulf unit. They give basic definitions of epic conventions, epic hero traits, archetypes, and major characters from the poem and allow space for students to write in textual evidence plus explanations for these items as they find them in the text. These are excellent tools to keep students organized when analyzing key concepts in the poem-- great for students of all levels! Thorough answer keys included with textual evidence and explanations! Graphic Organizer #1: Epic Conventions Graphic Organizer #2: Traits of the Epic Hero Graphic Organizer #3: Main Characters Graphic Organizer #4: Archetypes These items are included in my MEGA BEOWULF BUNDLE (25 lessons and activities with answer keys!). You can find the ENTIRE BUNDLE in our store, sold separately.
Beowulf Skills Application Test
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Beowulf Skills Application Test

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This multiple-choice/ matching test includes two pieces of "new material" that connect to the epic poem Beowulf ("The Seafarer" and "Ulysses" by Tennyson), a few historical questions about the Anglo-Saxon Period, a matching section of epithets to characters, a matching section of Anglo-Saxon traits to examples from the epic poem, a series of interpretation/ analysis questions, and a written response/ essay question. This test does NOT test rote memory-- it is a challenging skills application test that is 40 questions long and will truly assess your students' understanding of skills rather than plot. The two pieces of "new material" can be used as taught pieces as well. This test is a great way to align your assessments of Beowulf with the Common Core standards because it involves transferring skills rather than just memorization. Answer key is included!