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I am a History Teacher with a love for producing high quality and easily accessible history lessons which I have accumulated and adapted for over 20 years of my teaching career. I appreciate just how time consuming teaching now is and the difficulty of constantly producing resources for an ever changing curriculum.

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I am a History Teacher with a love for producing high quality and easily accessible history lessons which I have accumulated and adapted for over 20 years of my teaching career. I appreciate just how time consuming teaching now is and the difficulty of constantly producing resources for an ever changing curriculum.
Holocaust Bundle
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Holocaust Bundle

9 Resources
I have created this set of resources for the History Key Stage 3 National Curriculum ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world, 1901 to the present day. These lessons are also useful if you are studying Germany at GCSE, where never enough time can be devoted to the holocaust in depth and which students find so fascinating. The central question throughout these nine lessons is to establish who was to blame for the holocaust. They are closely linked together and students continually plot their ideas around a lightbulb, which can be referred back to each lesson (either dated or colour coded) to show progress throughout this unit of study. Pupils will learn the significance and impact of the holocaust on the wider world and be able to examine the causes and consequences of the systematic attacks on Jewish communities throughout Europe since the Middle Ages. They will learn key historical terms such as discrimination, persecution and genocide and understand the differences between concentration and extermination camps. They will be given sources to analyse such as the evidence from Anne Frank’s diary or an anti-Semitic tax return from Norwich in the Middle Ages and make historical inferences from them. Furthermore they will be able to write structured accounts and narratives of who was to blame, be it the Camp Guards or SS and Einsatszgruppen units. Each lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and are linked to the latest historical interpretations and ideas used by current history teachers. The lessons are fully adaptable in Powerpoint format and can be changed to suit. I have included a couple of free lessons to give an idea of what is being offered. I strongly recommend using GCSE style questions from your chosen exam board and markschemes to assess the pupils at the end of this unit, which are always available on line. The 9 lessons are broken down into the following: L1 An introduction to the holocaust L2 Anti-Semitism in Britain L3 Anti-Semitism in Germany (free resource) L4 Extremism to Extermination L5 How was it organised? L6 Who was to blame? L7 Jewish Resistance L8 Liberation of the extermination camps L9 Diary of Anne Frank (free resource) If you like this bundle, please review it and choose any of my resources worth up to £4 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
British Empire Bundle
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British Empire Bundle

11 Resources
In response to the National Curriculum, I have created a set of resources which focus on ’the development of the British Empire' with depth studies on India and Australia. Students will learn and understand key historical skills. These include historical concepts such empire and colonisation, continuity and change with a focus on the East India Company, the causes and consequences of British rule in India, similarities and differences within the British Empire, the analysis of sources and different interpretations of colonisation such as Australia and finally the significance of people such as Robert Clive, Mahatma Gandhi and Lord Kitchener and their legacy today. The 10 lessons are broken down into the following: 1) An introduction to Empire The lesson aims to find out whether we should be proud or ashamed of gaining an Empire. Students have to explain their choice of being proud or ashamed or both and as the lesson progresses justify whether they are sticking to their original decisions. 2) The British East India Company Students are asked if we should return the Koh-i-Noor diamond, the jewel in the British crown after analysing the evidence. A trading game ensures the students build upon their knowledge of the East India Company and they can then decide and justify if we should be proud of the company's actions in India. 3) Robert Clive This lesson explores the rise and fall of Robert Clive of India. Should he be regarded as a hero or a villain of the worst kind? 4) Focus Study – India The title of the lesson is 'Did the Raj Rock?' and attempts to look at the positive and negative aspects to British rule in India from government and law and order through to the building of the railways. 5) Gandhi and Indian independence This lesson focuses on the role Gandhi played in achieving Indian Independence from Britain. The lesson centers on his life and the part he played in achieving Independence in 1947. 6) Focus Study - Transportation to Australia Claimed by Captain James Cook in 1768, students study how and why the British used Australia as a penal colony. Using a real life example of a young boy sent there for petty crimes, students analyse his and others stories from the start of the voyage through to life in the colony. 7) The colonisation of Australia This lesson focuses on the upheaval of the Aborigines way of life in Australia with the coming of the Europeans. The students have to prioritise the most significant changes the colonists made. 8) The Scramble for Africa This lesson examines the colonisation of Africa by the European powers and the riches and rewards for doing so. 9) The Zulu Wars This lesson analyses the events of 1879 which have become infamous in British military history. Students analyse the battle of Isandlwana and the defence of Rourke's Drift. 10) The Boer War This lesson evaluates the role played by Lord Kitchener in the war as students decide how heroic he was. Furthermore they will analyse the significance of the war and the impact it had upon the government of the day. I have also included a British Empire key word display. Each lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and are linked to the latest historical interpretations, video clips and debate. The lessons are fully adaptable in PowerPoint format and can be adapted and changed to suit. If you like this bundle, please review it and choose any of my resources from my shop worth up to £3 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
British rule in India
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British rule in India

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The title of the lesson, ‘Did the Raj Rock?’ attempts to look at the positive and negative aspects to British rule in India. The opening slides introduce both sides of the argument from the views of modern historians to those at the time such as Cecil Rhodes, with a video link setting the scene for British rule in India and a thinking quilt to challenge students. Students must gather and analyse the evidence to make their own decisions. There are some positive aspects to British rule shown such as the building of railways, the provision of education and the introduction of law and order in the country. But at the same time a lack of sympathy for traditional customs and religious beliefs, an inadequacy of Indians in Government and the promotion of British wealth and power above all else will give students a lot of food for thought. In the plenary, students will rate how good an Empress Queen Victoria actually was. The lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and are linked to the latest historical interpretations, video clips and debate. The lessons are fully adaptable in PowerPoint format and can be changed to suit. Please visit my shop where I have created further resources on the British Empire including a bundle of lessons which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/the-british-empire-11638487 If you like this resource, please review it and choose any of my resources worth up to £3 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
East India Company
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East India Company

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This lesson questions whether Britain was in India for the right reasons. The subject matter is the East India Company and a study of how it slowly took over the country of India taking with it a precious diamond and making a fortune out of its trade. Students are asked if we should return the Koh-i-Noor diamond to India, the jewel in the British crown after analysing some important evidence. Students are also given key words to help them with their arguments as to whether the diamond should be returned to India or not. A trading game ensures the students build upon their knowledge of the East India Company and they can then decide and justify if we should be proud of the company’s actions or not. Each lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and are linked to the latest historical interpretations, video clips and debate. The lessons are fully adaptable in PowerPoint format and can be changed to suit. Please visit my shop where I have created further resources on the British Empire including a bundle of lessons which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/the-british-empire-11638487 If you like this resource, please review it and choose any of my resources worth up to £3 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
Causes of World War 2
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Causes of World War 2

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This lesson sets out to explains how Hitler set Germany on the road to World War II in 5 steps. Moreover students are challenged to find out how and why was he able to defy the Treaty of Versailles so easily with little or no consequences (shown through a causal spider’s web). Students analyse video footage and a number of sources, using the COP technique (modelled for student understanding) which has improved invaluable for evaluating sources at GCSE. A final chronological recap of the events and evaluation of the most and least important of the events that led to war, will give students an in depth understanding of why World War II started. The resource includes suggested teaching strategies and differentiated materials and comes in PDF and Powerpoint formats if there is a wish to adapt and change. This lesson is ideal as preparation for GCSE if you are embedding source skills or teaching the interwar years or WWII at Key stage 4. If you like this resource, please visit my shop where I have created a number of resources for the Home Front in Britain during World War 2 which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/world-war-2-britain-at-war-life-on-the-homefront-in-wwii-11983985 I have also made a bundle for World War 1 which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/the-first-world-war-and-the-peace-settlement-1914-1919-11875976
Colonisation of Australia and the Aborigines
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Colonisation of Australia and the Aborigines

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This lesson focuses on the upheaval of the Aborigines way of life in Australia with the coming of the Europeans. The lesson starts by looking at Aborigines customs and traditions and how these were quickly attacked through the attitudes and settlements of the colonists. A ‘Horrible Histories’ version of events is also scrutinised and questioned. Paintings from Governor Davey of Van Diemen’s Land are analysed and the students have to finally prioritise the most significant changes the colonists made. The lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and are linked to the latest historical interpretations, video clips and debate. The lessons are fully adaptable in PowerPoint format and can be changed to suit. Please visit my shop where I have created further resources on the British Empire including a bundle of lessons which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/the-british-empire-11638487 If you like this resource, please review it and choose any of my resources from my shop worth up to £3 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
Victorian crime and punishment
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Victorian crime and punishment

(1)
This is an interesting and engaging lesson for students as they decide who was a criminal (from their looks), which were the most common crimes in the early 1800’s and what you could expect at a public hanging though some source analysis. By the end of the lesson, students will be able to answer the following questions: Why was it so easy to commit crime in the Victorian period in the early nineteenth century and if you were unfortunate to get caught what could you expect from Victorian justice? What was the Bloody Code and why was the law so harsh to offenders irrespective in some cases of sex or age? There are also three case studies to unpick and students are left questioning the morality and effectiveness of the punishments inflicted. Please note that the reform of the criminal justice system is dealt with in other lessons such as the Victorian prison system and the setting up of the Metropolitan Police force by Sir Robert Peel and the abolition of the Bloody Code. There are a choice of plenaries from hangman to bingo and heart, head, bag, bin which get the students to prioritise the most ‘effective’ methods used to deal with crime. The resource comes in PDF and Powerpoint formats if there is a wish to adapt and change. I have also included suggested teaching strategies to deliver the lesson and there are differentiated materials included. If you like this resource, please visit my shop where I have created further resources on the Industrial Revolution which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory Please review this resource and receive a free Industrial Revolution key word literacy display worth £2.50 which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/the-industrial-revolution-key-word-literacy-display-11655546
Slavery Bundle
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Slavery Bundle

7 Resources
These seven lessons are designed to cover Britain’s transatlantic slave trade: its effects and its eventual abolition. All the lessons come with retrieval practise tasks, suggested teaching and learning strategies, differentiated materials and resources and all of them link to the latest interpretations of slavery from the bbc and other sources. The lessons are as follows: L1 The origins of Slavery L2 The triangular trade L3 The Middle Passage L4 The Slave Auction L5 The Slave Plantations L6 Punishments and Resistance L7 William Wilberforce and the Abolition of Slavery If you like this resource, please review it and choose any of my resources worth up to £3 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory Please also visit my shop where I have created a further bundles of resource such as Civil Rights in America which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/civil-rights-in-america-11823027
Civil Rights in America Bundle
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Civil Rights in America Bundle

10 Resources
These series of 10 lessons have been designed to fit into the National Curriculum scheme of work under 'a study of world history such as the USA in the 20th Century with its interconnections with other world developments and campaigns for Civil Rights’. Students will learn and understand key historical skills. They will identify significant events such as the events surrounding Arkansas and the Little Rock Nine, make connections with the Civil Rights campaigns led by Martin Luther King, draw contrasts with the teachings of Malcolm X and analyse trends within periods and over long arcs of time such as the Jim Crow Laws. They will use historical terms and concepts in increasingly sophisticated ways such as discrimination, prejudice and persecution. They will pursue historically valid enquiries including some they have framed themselves, and create relevant, structured and evidentially supported accounts in response to events such as the death of Emmett Till. Finally they will understand how different types of historical sources are used rigorously to make historical claims and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed; for example does Abraham Lincoln really deserve his historical reputation as the ’Great Emancipator’? The lessons come with retrieval practise activities, suggested teaching strategies and differentiated materials in PDF and PowerPoint format which can be adapted and changed to suit. I have included a free lesson to give an idea of what is being offered. The 10 lessons are broken down into the following: 1) Was Abraham Lincoln the Great Emancipator? 2) The Jim Crow Laws 3) The Little Rock Nine 4) Emmett Till 5) Rosa Parks 6) How could you protest? 7) Martin Luther King (free lesson) 8) Malcolm X 9) The influence of the KKK 10) Which obstacles do African Americans still face today? If you like this bundle, please review it and choose any of my resources worth up to £3 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
Kenilworth Castle Bundle AQA GCSE 9-1
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Kenilworth Castle Bundle AQA GCSE 9-1

2 Resources
Kenilworth Castle AQA GCSE 9-1 This Bundle has been designed to help teachers prepare for the AQA 2021 Historic Environment study on Kenilworth Castle. The included six page Revision Guide is aimed at both teachers and students to help study, organise, revise and be prepared for the AQA GCSE 9-1 Elizabethan England 1568-1603 Historic Environment question for 2021. I have included 6 possible questions for GCSE exam practice and broken down the main details of Kenilworth Castle into manageable chunks, using the 5p’s. This guide, using the ‘p’ words for simplification focuses on the main concepts, for example of its location in Warwickshire, its function and structure as it transformed itself from a defensive stronghold into a magnificent royal residence, the people connected to it such John of Gaunt and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, the design such as its Renaissance influence in its buildings and gardens and important events linked to it such as the firework display in 1575. The accompanying lesson aims to explain how Kenilworth Castle rose to prominence from a defensive fortification into a magnificent royal residence and how it played a significant role in the political power games of Elizabethan England in 1575. Students have to decide which are Kenilworth Castle’s most significant features and which people were involved in its illustrious history before writing a trip advisor review - with exemplar reviews and key argument words to help. These learning activities, as well as quizzes and video links allow the students to analyse and evaluate the true meaning behind the interior and façade of the Castle’s features and how it set the standard for other Elizabethan houses of the period. Students can also practise a GCSE exam question. Tips are given how to make a sustained line of argument rather than list the buildings and the entertainment on offer. The resources come in PDF and Word format if you wish to adapt and change. I would welcome any reviews which would be much appreciated. If you like the resources, please check out my updated AQA Elizabethan England, c.1568-1603 Revision Guide which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/aqa-gcse-9-1-revision-guide-elizabethan-england-c-1568-1603-11806156 You can also download my free copy of a previous Historic Environment Question on Hardwick Hall for 2018 for similar guidance which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/aqa-gcse-9-1-revision-guide-historic-environment-hardwick-hall-2018-11810703
Tudor exploration
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Tudor exploration

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This is the sixteenth in a series of lessons I have created on the Tudors. The aim of this lesson is to take students for a voyage of discovery on an Elizabethan sea voyage and would suit both Key Stage 3 and GCSE. Students take on the role of a Tudor sea farer and experience the excitement, fear, hardship and brutality of the Tudor navy as they learn which supplies they need to take and how to read the ‘latest’ maps and navigational tools at their disposal. They can sample the delights of food rustled up by the ship’s cook such as salted meats and the dreaded ship’s biscuit. They also become involved in a naval sea battle and learn the terrible destruction rendered upon the wooden ships and their crews. Each character card has a symbol upon it which also denotes a special surprise awaiting the crew member as the lesson unfolds. The lesson is complete with music, video footage and a chance for a sing a long with a sea shanty. Extensive notes accompany each slide, but be prepared to bring in items for discovery for the Tudor explorers. In the final differentiated activity, students fill in the ship’s log with an account of all they have learnt. The resource comes in PDF and Powerpoint formats if there is a wish to adapt and change. If you like this resource, please click on the link where I have created a bundle of resources on the Tudors: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/the-tudors-complete-bundle-11945066 Please review this lesson and receive a free Tudor key word History Display worth £2.50 which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/tudor-key-word-history-display-11653246
Industrial Revolution Bundle
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Industrial Revolution Bundle

11 Resources
I have created these set of resources for ‘Britain as the first industrial nation and its impact on society’ which comes under the ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain 1745-1901 in the National Curriculum. These lessons are also useful if you are studying this period at GCSE (such as AQA 9-1 GCSE Power and the People and OCR Explaining the Modern World) Pupils will learn the significance and impact of the changes in Britain as a result of the new inventions and be able to see the causes and consequences of these. They will learn key historical terms such as migration, entrepreneur, industrialised and patent as well as being able to see the change and continuity of transport. They will be given sources to analyse such as the evidence of child labour in the coal mines and make historical inferences from them. Furthermore they will be able to write structured accounts and narratives of the changes as a result of Factory Reforms as well as answering GCSE style questions using structured thinking quilts. Each lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and are linked to the latest historical interpretations and ideas used by current history teachers. The lessons are fully adaptable in Powerpoint format and can be changed to suit. I have included a couple of free lessons to give an idea of what is being offered. I strongly recommend using GCSE style questions from the exam board and markschemes to assess the pupils at the end of this unit, which are always available on line. The 11 lessons are broken down into the following: L1 An introduction to the Industrial Revolution in Britain L2 Why were people on the move? L3 What were the industrial towns like? L4 Transport in the Industrial Revolution L5 Richard Arkwright – a case study (free resource) L6 Factories and working conditions L7 Coal mining L8 Reform of working conditions L9 Victorian crime and punishment L10 Victorian prisons (free resource) L11 The Metropolitan Police Force If you like this bundle, please review it and choose any of my resources worth up to £4 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
Tudors Complete Bundle
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Tudors Complete Bundle

20 Resources
This bundle follows the Key Stage 3 National Curriculum - the development of Church, state and society in Britain 1509-1745 including the Elizabethan religious settlement and conflict with Catholics (including Scotland, Spain and Ireland). The aims of this bundle are to know and understand how people’s lives were shaped by the Tudors from Henry VII to Elizabeth I. I have created and used these lessons over the years to challenge and engage students, but also to show how much fun learning about this part of history really is. Please see the reviews for Elizabeth’s Portraits and the sinking of the Mary Rose to confirm this. Students will learn and understand key historical skills throughout such as continuity and change in dealing with Tudor poverty, the causes and consequences of Henry’s break with Rome, the similarities and differences in how they dealt with threats to their rule in England and from abroad, the significance of Elizabeth I and her conflict with Spain and evaluating sources and interpretations such as the reputation of Mary I. The 20 lessons are broken down into the following: L1 The War of the Roses L2 Did Henry VIII really act as a Gangster? L3 An introduction to Henry VIII L4 Did Henry VIII break with Rome for love? L5 Did Henry VIII break with Rome for faith? L6 Did Henry VIII break with Rome for money? L7 What were the effects of the dissolution of the monasteries L8 Who should Henry VII blame for the sinking of the Mary Rose? L9 How important was the reign of Edward VI? L10 Does Mary I deserve her ‘bloody’ reputation? L11 The young Elizabeth L12 The Elizabethan Settlement (free resource) L13 Elizabeth and the problem of marriage L14 Elizabeth and her portraits L15 How did Elizabeth deal with Mary, Queen of Scots? L16 Lets explore in Tudor times (Kinaesthetic and active lesson) L17 Famous explorers (Drake, Hawkins and Raleigh) L18 The Spanish Armada L19 Elizabeth, poverty and the Poor Law L20 Elizabethan Theatre and the Globe Each lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies and are linked to the latest historical interpretations and debate from the BBC and other sources. The lessons are fully adaptable in PowerPoint format and can be changed to suit. I have included a free lesson to give an idea of what is being offered. Further free lessons on the Tudors can be found by visiting my shop below. Although this bundle is aimed at Key Stage 3, it is ideal if you are studying the Tudors for 9-1 GCSE History as it covers the main themes, concepts and skills required. If you like this bundle, please review it and choose any of my resources worth up to £3 for free: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
Germany Democracy and Dictatorship Revision Bundle
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Germany Democracy and Dictatorship Revision Bundle

4 Resources
The aim of this revision bundle for AQA Germany 1890-1945, Democracy and Dictatorship is to help and thoroughly prepare students for the GCSE exam in the summer. It contains the following: A complete Revision Guide with 23 GCSE practise questions, model answers and tips on how to access the exam questions. **Flashcards **to help improve recall, retrieval and retention skills. Each event from the course is summarised and key words included to achieve the higher marks in the GCSE exam. A Summary Revision Guide which summarises all the course on two sides of A4. This is easy to print and great for the student who wants a quick refresh on the course content when revising. Bitesize Revision cards which summarise the course content in 14 themes. All the resources are in PDF and Word format so can be easily changed or adapted to suit.
Medieval Kings - who had the power?
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Medieval Kings - who had the power?

7 Resources
This bundle has been put together to address the National Curriculum and the development of Church, State and Society in Medieval Britain 1066-1509 at Key Stage 3. The key question posed throughout these seven lessons is ‘Who had the power’? The Medieval Kings in question are King Henry II, King Richard I, King John and Richard II. These seven lessons build up a picture of the character of these Kings before analysing how their authority was challenged, be it from the church, the barons or the people. How could they rule without their help and how did they try to rule on their own whilst trying to exert their own authority over them? We see how King Henry II was forced to back down against his feud with the Church in the event of the murder of Thomas Becket, how Richard continued to balance the power of Kingship with the Church, why King John was forced to ‘accede’ his powers to the barons in the signing of the Magna Carta and finally how King RIchard II dealt with a peasants’ revolt which challenged his authority. Students plot this power struggle on a graph in these sequence of lessons from which they can make links and connections. These lessons are designed to be fun, challenging and engaging as well as dispelling popular myths about these Kings and why we remember them so much in our History today. The lessons are broken down into the following: L1 Henry II and the murder of Thomas Becket L2 Was Henry II really sorry for the death of Becket? L3 Who was the real King Richard the Lionheart? L4 Was King John really a meanie? L5 The significance of the Magna Carta L6 The siege of Rochester Castle (free lesson) L7 The Peasants’ Revolt All the resources are differentiated and come in PDF and Powerpoint formats if there is a wish to adapt and change. I have also included suggested teaching strategies to deliver in the lessons. If you like this resource, please visit my shop where I have created further resources on Medieval Society which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/PilgrimHistory
Baseline History Assessment Test
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Baseline History Assessment Test

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The aim of this test is to find out how much the students know about history. The results will give you a baseline from which you can build upon. Once they begin to study history, they will begin to show progress in all areas, particularly in the amount of detail required in answers. The test focuses on chronology, cause and consequence, change and continuity, historical enquiry, interpretation and significance. This is a particularly useful assessment for a history department and as a starting point and ideally for Year 7. Most students sadly will not have studied a lot of history at their primary schools (apart from the odd day to study the Victorians or World War 2) as literary, numeracy and SATS still dominate primary school curriculum planning. The resource is differentiated and gives suggested teaching strategies. It comes in PDF, Word and Powerpoint formats which can be amended and changed to suit. If you like this resource please review it and receive a free Norman Key Word History display worth £2.50 which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/normans-display-11652737
Kenilworth Castle Revision Guide
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Kenilworth Castle Revision Guide

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This six page Revision Guide is aimed at students to help study, organise, revise and be prepared for the AQA GCSE 9-1 Elizabethan England 1568-1603 Historic Environment question for 2021. I have included 6 possible questions for GCSE exam practise and broken down the main details of Kenilworth Castle into manageable chunks, using the 5 w’s. This guide, using the ‘w’ words for simplification, focuses on the main concepts, for example of its location in Warwickshire, its function and structure as it transformed itself from a defensive stronghold into a magnificent royal residence, the people connected to it such John of Gaunt and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, the design such as the Renaissance influence in its buildings and gardens and important events linked to it such as the firework display for the royal progress in 1575. All the information and more is advised by AQA through their Paper 2: Shaping the nation resource pack guidance. I have also gained inspiration from renowned historians such as Lucy Worsley and Carmel Bones of whom I am extremely grateful. Carmel Bones is a leading specialist and writer for Elizabethan England and delivers AQA courses on Elizabethan England as well as for Hodder Education and has written for BBC Bitesize. The resource comes in PDF and Word if you wish to adapt and change. I would welcome any reviews on this resource which would be much appreciated. If you like the resource, please check out my AQA Elizabeth Revision Guide, c.1568-1603 which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/aqa-gcse-9-1-revision-guide-elizabethan-england-c-1568-1603-11806156 You can also download my free copy of the previous Historic Environment Question on Hardwick Hall for 2018 for similar guidance which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/aqa-gcse-9-1-revision-guide-historic-environment-hardwick-hall-2018-11810703
Conflict and Tension Revision Workbook
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Conflict and Tension Revision Workbook

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With revision in full swing, I have started to make these revision workbooks, which my Year 11 students love (as an alternative to death by Powerpoint). We pick certain sections each lesson to revise and come up with model answers and discuss the best way to tackle each question, considering exam time constraints. I print out the sheets in A5, which the students stick in their books and use to colour code They answer the questions next to or underneath the sheets. They can also be used for homework or interleaving.
Introduction to the Tudors
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Introduction to the Tudors

(4)
This is the second in a series of lessons I have created on the Tudors. It can be used as an introduction to the Tudors. The key skill of chronology is introduced from the start as students decide which Tudor came first to which came last. Key questions floating past the screen as well as the wall of mystery give clues and answers to some interesting and gruesome facts on the Tudor family. Students have the chance to create their own timelines, factual displays, key question and answer quizzes or an A-Z of Tudor facts. The lesson finishes which two plenaries to choose from which both test their new found knowledge. The resource comes in PDF and Powerpoint formats if there is a wish to adapt and change. I have also included suggested teaching strategies and differentiated resources to deliver the lesson. If you like this resource, please click on the link where I have created a bundle of resources on the Tudors: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/the-tudors-complete-bundle-11945066 Please review this lesson and receive a free Tudor key word History Display worth £2.50 which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/tudor-key-word-history-display-11653246
The Anglo-Saxons
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The Anglo-Saxons

(3)
The aim of this lesson is to understand why Britain was such a good place to invade. It is ideally targeted for Year 7 students. They are given a thinking quilt to link words and meanings together and challenge them in their reasoning to go some way to understand and answer this question. Further information will help them understand what Britain had to offer giving context to its cities, markets and fayres as well as natural resources and weather. The resource is differentiated and gives suggested teaching strategies. It comes in PDF and Powerpoint format which can be amended and changed to suit. If you like this resource please review it and receive a free Norman Key Word History display worth £2.50 which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/normans-display-11652737