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I am a History Teacher with a love for producing high quality and easily accessible history lessons, which I have accumulated and adapted for over 20 years of my teaching career. I appreciate just how time consuming teaching now is and the difficulty of constantly producing resources for an ever changing curriculum.

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I am a History Teacher with a love for producing high quality and easily accessible history lessons, which I have accumulated and adapted for over 20 years of my teaching career. I appreciate just how time consuming teaching now is and the difficulty of constantly producing resources for an ever changing curriculum.
Medicine Through Time Key Individuals
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Medicine Through Time Key Individuals

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Edexcel GCSE 9-1 Medicine Through Time, c1250-present These key individual flashcards aim to get the students thinking of key people and their significance in medicine. I always find students have revised thoroughly for exams, but do not push their grades into the higher brackets as they focus on content rather than the individual’s impact and importance, particularly over time. These flashcards are great when addressing the 12 mark ‘explain why’ question, particularly when arguing over rapid change. There are 26 individuals listed including those for the Historic Environment; The British sector of the Western Front. Students can use them in class (I use them as starters and plenaries) or to take home and use for their own personal revision programme. I also display them in the classroom (enlarged) and use when teaching this unit of study I have included both PDF and Powerpoint formats if there is a desire to adapt and change. If you like this resource, please check out my Medicine Through Time Revision Guide, which can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/medicine-through-time-revision-guide-12313331
Weimar and Nazi Germany Revision Guide Summary
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Weimar and Nazi Germany Revision Guide Summary

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This resource (in booklet form) sets out the Edexcel GCSE 9-1 Modern Depth Study, Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-1939 in two sides of A4. This is ideal for the student who wants a quick recap before the exam as it includes all the main details in bullet form. It is also great for quickly printing and giving out for revision lessons, especially when the students claim they cannot remember anything they have been taught! This resource can be also used for homework and interleaving or for quickly recapping topics. This resource can also be easily emailed to parents to help students with their revision studies at home or put on the school’s digital platform. I have included both PDF and Word formats if there is a need to change or adapt.
Wars of the Roses
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Wars of the Roses

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Tudors This is the first in a series of lessons I have created on the Tudors. This lesson is broken down into two parts. The first part describes and explains the events surrounding the Wars of the Roses. Students learn about the Kings involved and the battles fought through fun tasks, video evidence and role play of which they have to make choices on the victors. With this new found knowledge they have to explain what they have learnt through a ‘talk like an historian’ quiz. The second part of the lesson focuses on the previous Tudor perceptions of Richard III. Was he really a deceitful and cunning person, ‘a lump of foul deformity’ with a hunchback according to Shakespeare, More and Virgil? Archaeological evidence from King Richard’s remains is analysed by the students to prove or disprove some of these popular ‘misconceptions’ about his posture and character. Students are then challenged to write to the current Education Secretary to make sure correct history lessons are now taught about Richard III in secondary schools. This lesson is fully resourced includes suggested teaching strategies, differentiated materials and comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited to show the progress of learning.
Gandhi and Indian Independence
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Gandhi and Indian Independence

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The British Empire This lesson focuses on the role Gandhi played in achieving Indian independence from Britain which ultimately cost him his life. The first part of the lesson looks at why the Indian population were unhappy with British rule, from the Indian Mutiny of 1857, events happening abroad to the Rowlatt Act culminating in the Amritsar Massacre. They are then introduced to Gandhi, his philosophy of passive resistance (or as he called it satyagraha) and why he set up his Independent Congress Party. This is accompanied with some excellent video footage from the BBC as well as clips from the film ‘Gandhi’ by Sir Richard Attenborough. The second part of the lesson centers around his life and by analysing various sources from which they complete either a table or grid; students then have to decide how big a part Gandhi played in many events leading to Independence and his lasting legacy for India in 1947. The lesson comes with retrieval practice activities, suggested teaching and learning strategies, differentiated materials and is linked to the latest historical interpretations, video clips and debate. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question posed at the start of the lesson and revisited at the end to show the progress of learning. The lessons are fully adaptable in PowerPoint format and can be changed to suit.
Lord Burghley's Almshouses Bundle
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Lord Burghley's Almshouses Bundle

3 Resources
This Bundle has been designed to help teachers and students prepare for the AQA 2022 Historic Environment study on Lord Burghley’s Almshouses. Resource 1: The Revision Guide includes 6 possible questions for GCSE exam practice and breaks down the main details and significance of Lord Burghley’s Almshouses into manageable chunks using student friendly language. Resource 2: As an introduction to this Historic Environment question, I have included a lesson on Poverty and the Elizabethan Poor Law of 1601. This lesson explores why there was an increase in poverty in Elizabethan England and what it like to be poor. Furthermore it explains how many Elizabethans had little sympathy for the poor whom they saw an itinerants and idle beggars. However the lesson also focuses on how some attitudes changed and why was there a rise in the building of Almshouses by the end of the Sixteenth Century. Resource 3: The lesson included on Lord Burghley explores the significance of his Almshouses by focusing on where the Almshouses were built (location), who Lord Burghley was (people connected), when they were built and/or modified (reflection), what its features were (function and structure) and more importantly why he built them (important events). All the resources come in PDF, Word or Powerpoint formats if you wish to adapt and change. I would welcome any reviews, which would be much appreciated.
British rule in India
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British rule in India

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The British Empire The aims of the lesson are to decide who were the main beneficiaries of British rule in India. The opening slides introduce the views of modern historians to those at the time such as Cecil Rhodes, with a video link setting the scene for British rule in India and a thinking quilt to challenge students. Throughout, students are encouraged to gather and analyse the evidence to make their own conclusions. There are some beneficial aspects to British rule shown such as the building of railways, the provision of education and the introduction of law and order in the country. A focus on Mumbai’s railway station facade and its network cites the legacy of Empire as well. But at the same time a lack of sympathy for traditional customs and religious beliefs, an inadequacy of Indian officials in Government and the promotion of British wealth and power above all else will give students a lot of conflictory evidence. In the plenary, students will rate how beneficial an Empress Queen Victoria actually was for bringing India under direct British control. The lesson comes with retrieval practice activities, suggested teaching and learning strategies, differentiated materials and is linked to the latest historical interpretations, video clips and debate. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question posed at the start of the lesson and revisited at the end to show the progress of learning. The lessons are fully adaptable in PowerPoint format and can be changed to suit.
Suffragists and Suffragettes
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Suffragists and Suffragettes

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Suffragettes The lesson focuses on the main differences between the Suffragists and Suffragettes, but also looks at their similarities. Students are asked as to why women wanted the vote and how they were going to achieve it? Further into the lesson, students have to analyse the various methods used by both groups and have to question, prioritise and justify their effectiveness. An exemplar answer and a great video link are given to complement this. Furthermore a thinking quilt tests their understanding and links the key ideas, dates, people and definitions together. A differentiated plenary questions their understanding of the lesson. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited to show the progress of learning. The resource includes suggested teaching strategies, retrieval practice, differentiated materials and comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change.
Germany Democracy and Dictatorship Revision Guide
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Germany Democracy and Dictatorship Revision Guide

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This is a Revision Guide tailored to the new AQA Germany 1890-1945: Democracy and Dictatorship specification for GCSE 9-1. I have been inspired to write this not due to a lack of revision guides for Germany out there (as there are plenty and of good quality), but because I needed to tailor it to suit the new GCSE 9-1 specification complete with the types of questions and the skills on how to answer them for my students. Therefore this Revision Guide includes GCSE exam question practise throughout on the six main questions and gives examples using model answers. The information is also broken down into an easy to use format to aid the students in their revision programme. I have also included some useful mnemonics for specific areas of study which have really helped in past GCSEs. This Guide has been designed to be engaging, detailed and easy to follow and can be edited and changed to suit with both PDF and Word files included. Any reviews on this resource would be much appreciated. Please email me for a free copy of my AQA Germany revision summary guide worth £3 if you do. I have also made similar revision resources for AQA GCSE 9-1 include Britain: Health and the People c.1000 to the present day, Elizabethan England c,1568-1603, Conflict and Tension and Power and the People.
Medieval Towns
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Medieval Towns

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The Norman Conquest This lesson has two aims; to discover if medieval towns were dangerous places to live and to question how dirty and unhygienic they actually were. Students learn how Medieval towns grew up through Charters and Guilds and how shops and their names and surnames became intertwined. An exercise tests their ability to interpret shop signs. They analyse a number of statements about the dangers facing townsfolk and evidence this on a road map (or dirt track) using danger symbols and accompanying road signs. The second part of the lesson focuses on the filth and dirt of Medieval towns and questions how much the local authorities did. Students evaluate how hygienic towns were, colour coding thermometers and rating each step taken by the local authorities (or not as the case may be). This lesson is therefore designed to be interactive, fun, challenging and engaging and could be used over two lessons. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited at the end using a rate ‘o’ meter to show the progress of learning. The resource is differentiated and gives suggested teaching strategies. It comes in Powerpoint format which can be amended and changed to suit.
Edward VI
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Edward VI

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The Tudors This is the tenth in a series of lessons I have created on the Tudors. This lesson aims to question the importance of Edward VI and his priorities when he became King. Recent research has claimed Edward was not a sickly boy at all and therefore this is not the emphasis of the lesson. Instead students have to think about the importance of religion and the changes he made, even to the extent of altering the succession. The lesson starts with a play your cards right game, the cards turning and the dates revealed as students are tested on their chronological understanding. In true world cup fashion, they have to narrow down his fixtures, culminating in a final and winning priority. This lesson includes challenges using numbers, a true or false quiz, source work as well as video evidence to give the students a thorough knowledge of his six year reign. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited to show the progress of learning. The resource includes suggested teaching strategies, retrieval practice, differentiated materials and comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change.
British Empire Bundle
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British Empire Bundle

13 Resources
With the National Curriculum in mind, I have created a set of resources which focus on ’the development of the British Empire' with depth studies on India and Australia. Furthermore I have been inspired to review and adapt these teaching resources due to recent debates about the impact of the British Empire on the indigenous peoples it conquered and the legacy of Empire and how it influences us still today. I would also like to thank Sathnam Sanghera for his brilliant book ‘Empireland’ and his enlightened debate on the British Empire and how and why it should be taught in schools. This bundle includes historical concepts such empire and colonisation, continuity and change with a focus on the East India Company, the causes and consequences of British rule in India, similarities and differences within the British Empire, the analysis of sources and different interpretations of colonisation such as Australia and finally the significance of people such as Robert Clive, Mahatma Gandhi and Lord Kitchener and their legacy today. The 12 lessons are broken down into the following: 1) An introduction to Empire 2) The American War of Independence 3) The British East India Company 4) Robert Clive 5) Focus Study – India 6) Gandhi and Indian independence 7) Focus Study - Transportation to Australia 8) The colonisation of Australia 9) The Scramble for Africa 10) The Zulu Wars 11) The Boer War Bonus lesson: 12) Empire soldiers in World War 1 + British Empire History Display Each lesson comes with suggested teaching and learning strategies, retrieval practice activities, differentiated materials and are linked to the latest historical interpretations, video clips and debate. The lessons are fully adaptable in PowerPoint format and can be adapted and changed to suit.
Gunpowder Plot
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Gunpowder Plot

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The Stuarts The aim of this lesson is to decide why an audacious plot was hatched against James 1 and why might the plotters themselves be framed by the Government itself. This lesson is therefore split into two. The first half examines the men and their roles in the infamous plot to blow up the King in 1605. Students are introduced through talking heads to Guy Fawkes and King James. They also study sources from the time, including Robert Cecil’s account of the plot and analyse the words trying to make inferences between fact and fiction. A model answer is provided to aid their analytical skills. Furthermore they will evaluate the causes and consequences of the plot and its significance today. The second part of the lesson will require the interpretation of a number of sources to decide if the plotters were actually framed by Cecil and the government who allegedly knew about the plot all along and actively encouraged it. Students have to decide for themselves before reaching a judgement using key words to aid them. This is excellent groundwork for source analysis they will later tackle at GCSE. The plenary is to talk like an historian answering key questions using information from the lesson. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited throughout to show the progress of learning. The resource includes suggested teaching strategies and differentiated materials, and comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change.
Lord Burghley's Almshouses Revision Guide
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Lord Burghley's Almshouses Revision Guide

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Lord Burghley’s Almshouses This six page revision guide is aimed at students to help study, organise, revise and be prepared for the AQA GCSE 9-1 Elizabethan England 1568-1603 Historic Environment question for 2022. I have included 6 possible questions for GCSE exam practice and broken down the main details of Lord Burghley’s Almshouses into manageable chunks, using the 5W’s. This guide, using the ‘w’ words for simplification, focuses on the main concepts; for example its location in Stamford, its function and structure as it transformed itself from a hospital into a residence for 13 poor men, the people connected to it such as William Cecil, Lord Burghley, the design such as its east and west wings and six distinct chimneys and important events which influenced its owner, such as Puritanism and the changing attitudes towards the poor. All the information and more is advised by AQA through their Paper 2: Shaping the nation resource pack guidance. I have also gained inspiration in my research for this study from renowned historian Dr John Guy and his podcast on Lord Burghley, of whom I am extremely grateful. The resource comes in PDF and Word if you wish to adapt and change. Any reviews of this resource which would gratefully appreciated.
Fall of the Berlin Wall
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Fall of the Berlin Wall

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EDEXCEL GCSE 9-1 Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941-91 The aim of this lesson is to analyse the significance of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the impact upon Europe with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Students begin by recapping key facts about the Wall and how citizens of East Germany could travel to the west through Austria. They will learn how the fall and destruction of the wall came about an given significance ratings to ten consequences, which students can use to complete an extended writing task. There are some excellent video links to watch as well as images to decipher during the lesson. A GCSE question tackling the importance of the fall of the wall can be completed at the end of the lesson with help and a writing frame provided. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question of how close was the world to a nuclear war using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited throughout this and subsequent lessons to show the progress of learning. The lessons in this bundle are therefore linked together to build up a picture of how diplomacy, propaganda and spying led two Superpowers with opposing political ideologies to create tensions, rivalries and distrust as well as form mutual understanding and cooperation over the time period in question. The resource includes retrieval practice, suggested teaching strategies, differentiated material and GCSE question practice. It comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change.
Mary, Queen of Scots
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Mary, Queen of Scots

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The Tudors This is the seventeenth in a series of lessons I have created on the Tudors. This lesson poses the question ‘How much of a threat did Mary, Queen of Scots pose to Elizabeth I?’ Students are taken through Mary’s life from becoming Queen of Scotland to the controversy of her husbands and her eventual house arrest in England. Through sources, visual and video evidence, students have conclude how much of a threat Mary posed to Elizabeth, after pleading their case through the eyes of Mary herself. There is some help to write an extended answer using key words which help mention cause and effect, to sequence events and to emphasise judgements. There is also analysis of the Babington Plot and a deciphering exercise to work out on how Mary was implicated. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited to show the progress of learning. The resource includes suggested teaching strategies, retrieval practice, differentiated materials and comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change.
Causes of World War 2
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Causes of World War 2

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This lesson sets out to explains how Hitler set Germany on the road to war in 5 steps. Students are challenged to find out how and why was he able to defy the Treaty of Versailles so easily with little or no consequences (shown through a causal spider’s web). Students analyse video footage and a number of sources, using the COP technique (modelled for student understanding) which has proved invaluable for evaluating sources at GCSE. A final chronological recap of the events and evaluation of the most and least important of the events that led to war, will give students an in depth understanding of why World War II started. This lesson is ideal as preparation for GCSE if you are embedding source skills or teaching the interwar years or WWII at Key stage 4. It is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited throughout to show the progress of learning. The resource includes retrieval practice activities, suggested teaching strategies and differentiated materials and comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change.
Victorian crime and punishment
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Victorian crime and punishment

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The aim of this lesson is to question how effective Victorian justice was. This is an interesting and engaging lesson for students as they decide who was a criminal (from their looks), which were the most common crimes in the early 1800’s and what you could expect at a public hanging though some source analysis. By the end of the lesson, students will be able to answer the following questions: Why was it so easy to commit crime in the Victorian period in the early nineteenth century and if you were unfortunate to get caught what could you expect from Victorian justice? What was the Bloody Code and why was the law so harsh to offenders irrespective in some cases of sex or age? There are also three case studies to unpick and students are left questioning the morality and effectiveness of the punishments inflicted. Please note that the reform of the criminal justice system is dealt with in other lessons such as the Victorian prison system and the setting up of the Metropolitan Police force by Sir Robert Peel and the abolition of the Bloody Code. There are a choice of plenaries from hangman to bingo and heart, head, bag, bin which get the students to prioritise the most ‘effective’ methods used to deal with crime. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited at the end to show the progress of learning. The resource comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change. I have also included suggested teaching strategies to deliver the lesson and there are differentiated materials included.
Coal mining in the Industrial Revolution
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Coal mining in the Industrial Revolution

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The aim of this aim is to assess why coal became known as ‘black gold’. Students learn how important coal was to the Industrial Revolution and how it was used in a number of areas. However the interesting facts focus on its extraction and yet again the dangers involved for all concerned, especially children. Students have to rate how effective the various measures put in place were to overcome some of the problems They also have to tackle some historical hexagonals to get them thinking and linking all the information together. A find and fix plenary should test their recall and knowledge from the lesson. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited at the end to show the progress of learning. The resource comes in Powerpoint format if there is a wish to adapt and change. I have also included suggested teaching strategies to deliver the lesson and there are differentiated materials included.
Pearl Harbour
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Pearl Harbour

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The aim of the lesson is to question if Japan was justified in attacking Pearl Harbour without a declaration of war against the United States. This question is revisited later in the lesson to see if the students have changed their minds. As this is a new theatre of war and not in Europe, the lesson sets out clearly where the war was fought in the Pacific, the location of Pearl Harbour and its significance to the USA. Students are required to discover what Japan wanted and the reasons behind their surprise attack with a choice of options available to piece the jigsaw together. An excellent activity of Pearl Harbour in numbers, which is an idea from KNNTeach, enables students to clearly recognise the initial damage done to Pearl Harbour by the Japanese attack. There are audio and video links to film footage as well as a plenary activity from which the students have to make up questions to the answers given on post it notes. The lesson is enquiry based with a key question using a lightbulb posed at the start of the lesson and revisited throughout to show the progress of learning.
Conflict and Tension Revision Workbook
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Conflict and Tension Revision Workbook

(1)
With revision in full swing, I have started to make these revision workbooks, which my Year 11 students love (as an alternative to death by Powerpoint). We pick certain sections each lesson to revise and come up with model answers and discuss the best way to tackle each question, considering exam time constraints. I print out the sheets in A5, which the students stick in their books and use to colour code They answer the questions next to or underneath the sheets. They can also be used for homework or interleaving.