Hero image

SpectrumSavvy's Shop

A neurotypical embracing neurodiversity through social media, bespoke autism related training and resources.

A neurotypical embracing neurodiversity through social media, bespoke autism related training and resources.
Writing a formal email (Level 1 Functional Skills English)
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Writing a formal email (Level 1 Functional Skills English)

(1)
This document guides learners through the importance of getting email etiquette right, how to structure an email and how to proof read their written work. Learners are then asked to attempt a previous exam question on writing formal email and check their work using a proof reading checklist and the Eexcel / Pearsons marking criteria. The document has gathered information from other sources which are referenced accordingly. Designed to be used by level 1 functional skills learners.
Stress Bucket Worksheet
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Stress Bucket Worksheet

(1)
This can be used with the Behaviour is Communication powerpoint as part of a staff development activity or with an individual who maybe feeling overwhelmed with life. The stress bucket provides a visual representation of every day and underlying challenges we face, how resilient we are, what coping strategies we have and what happens when the power of the stressors outway the power of the coping strategies. (The bucket spills over). I have used successfully on a number of occassions, to help young people who are autistic, have ADHD, have anxiety or are neurotypical. It helps illustrate why they might be losing their temper, avoiding situations or feeling overwhelmed. It helps illustrate when someone needs to spend more time on their coping strategies or self care such as exercise, music, time with pets and so on. Here’s a video I use with some young people to explain the stress bucket. If this is quite advanced, I do a simplified version by hand on the white board. https://youtu.be/1KYC5SsJjx8 I hope you find the stress bucket as useful as I have. Please note, the blue stress bucket image for illustration purposes is taken from Google images and is not my work or included in the download.
Comic Strip Conversations
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Comic Strip Conversations

(0)
This powerpoint provides an explanation of Comic strip conversations. Their key functions are: Visually working through a problem and identifying solutions Systematically identifying what people say and do Emphasising what people may be thinking May provide insight into someone’s perspective of a situation Excellent prerequisite to a social storyTM Illustration of social skills which are abstract or difficult to understand Their rationale is: Visualisation and visual supports are useful for structuring learning and showing how individual components connect and interact Useful for improving comprehension around conversation Understanding other thoughts and feelings is just as important as understanding their words and actions.
Behavioural Incident Report with Functional Analysis of Behaviour
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Behavioural Incident Report with Functional Analysis of Behaviour

(0)
This document guides staff though a reflective and analytical process when an individual has displayed behaviour perceived to be challenging. It seeks to support staff in exploring the reasons ‘challenging behaviour’ occurs and to promote reflective practice around education and support. The aim is to assist staff in understanding and meeting an individual’s needs so that challenging behaviour reduces. Those completing the process should consider the following key questions throughout the process: • Was the individual seeking to escape a situation they were not ‘ready for’? • Were the supposed consequences something they were actually seeking? e.g. Individual is put in ‘isolation’ but this may be relief to them if they are feeling social overwhelmed. Could this lead to the behaviour being repeated? • Can more be done to teach coping, assertiveness and communication strategies to replace the challenging behaviour? • Do staff consistently demonstrate a good understanding of an individual’s needs? • Are opportunities to share good inclusive practice maximised?
Disability and Education Timeline
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Disability and Education Timeline

(0)
The following pages provide a timeline of key events and attitudes related to disability and education from the 1760s through the years to the SEND Code of practice in 2014. The resource has been designed to get participants thinking about perceptions of disability through time. Each participant has a page to work from (12 pages available). They should use the prompts provided in the footer to make notes. They should then contribute in turn to a group discussion, starting with the oldest page, leading up to the present day, making comparisons and observations on each other’s time periods. Key questions: • Has any language surprised you? • At what point was inclusive education getting on the right track? • Is education ahead of society or the other way around? • Which disabilities are understood best? • Which disabilities are least understood? Why might this be? • When were people with learning disabilities considered teachable? • What do you think about the sterilisation proposals • Consider how parents would feel if they had a child with a disability • Consider how self-esteem may be effected by societies attitudes • What are the advantages and disadvantages of special schools? • What are the advantages and disadvantages of seeking inclusion in mainstream? • Is true inclusion possible? Further discussion: • Have we now achieved best practice in terms of inclusion? • Describe a perfectly inclusive classroom / learning environment / school.
Famous Autistics
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Famous Autistics

(0)
This powerpoint presentation provides a list of famous people who are thought to be autistic. This has been used as printed cards for discussion when helping individuals to understand autism and feel more empowered regarding their diagnosis.
Equality Impact Assessment Proforma
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Equality Impact Assessment Proforma

(0)
Equality Impact Assessments focused on fairness, access and inclusion. They help us to consider a policy, service or process in terms of how it might affect different groups protected in law. This EIA proforma places more emphasis on disability, prompting consideration of reasonable adjustments thus further supporting your compliance with the Equality Act 2010.
Microteach: Appropriate Behaviour for Independence
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Microteach: Appropriate Behaviour for Independence

(0)
This is a lesson plan for a 20 minute microteach on the subject of socially appropriate behaviour for increasing independence. For example, if we are hygienic we will be given more responsibility on our work placement. If we are cautious what information we give away to strangers we will be able to spend more time at the shops etc without supervision and guidance. There are resources to accompany this lesson plan.
How old do you have to be to...?
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

How old do you have to be to...?

(0)
A simple matching activity to begin exploring the age you have to be to legally do various activities in the UK. The Word document is easy to edit so you an add topics suited to your group. This has been used as part of independent living skills, Citizenship and exploring Emotions and Behaviour.
Giving independence advice
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Giving independence advice

(0)
This resource is designed to help learners explore barriers to becoming more independent. The resource consists of case studies and a page of visual prompts to be considered as possible ways to break down barriers to independence. E.g. role playing an activity before doing it for real or using google images to plan a route to an unfamiliar place. Both effective ways to reduce anxiety levels. Learners are required to consider up to four basic cases studies and offer advice from the options provided. Advice can be different forms depending on the level of the learner e.g. Learners can illustrate the advice, using sheet 2 as guidance, they can copy the label of the advice or they can form their own sentence(s) inspired by the options provided. The activity can be used with the key words for independence to embed literacy skills.
Behaviour for Independence Words and Opposites
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Behaviour for Independence Words and Opposites

(0)
A list of words to describe the necessary behaviour for building independence. Words are accompanied by their opposites. The format is designed to be printed, cut out and laminated for future use. The words can be used to help build sentences with varied vocabulary when discussing independence in class. The can be used to represent two ends of a continuum for learners to self assess against the behaviours.
Feelings Survey and activities
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Feelings Survey and activities

(0)
This resource was inspired by the Inside Out film and has been used to help autistic learners label, make sense of and respond to their own and others emotions. It links to PSHE relationships, interpersonal skills, communication, emotional literacy, reflection and much more.
Understanding Autism, disability and difference
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Understanding Autism, disability and difference

(0)
This powerpoint guides users through a lesson to help young children understand that people have different needs and how it is right and fair to accommodate them. Ideal for exploring diversity, disability, autism and the paralympics. One of the main characters features Stephen Wiltshire (the human camera) as child. It would be a valuable activity to watch videos of him on youtube . This would help explore that we all have different strengths and weaknesses. This resource was developed by Spectrum Savvy to help build peer relationships and tolerance where autistic learners were being misunderstood in mainstream. If you would like Nicola at Spectrum Savvy to deliver this session or similar to your setting, visit www.spectrumsavvy.co.uk,
Skills Bingo and Skills Collection
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Skills Bingo and Skills Collection

(0)
This activity was developed when working on employability skills and identifying that many learners were unaware and / or unable to say what they were good at. Many learners also struggled to engage with peers outside of their friendship group. The activity encourages positive interaction between learners, makes it easier to discuss personal strengths, and if done effectively, nurtures positive self esteem. The activity consists of a range of 12 editible ‘bingo cards’. Instructions are below and included in the word document. You will need One bingo sheet per learner (there are 12 different cards provided, so you may need to print more than one set). One pen per learner Introduction Invite learners to verbally contribute a range of skills we use in school / college, especially those that will also apply in the work place. Discuss the difficulties we often have in identifying and verbalising our own skills. E.g. We are taught not to show off, so it feels uncomfortable doing what might be seen as boasting. Explain that in preparing for employment (CV writing, application forms and interviews) we need to gain an understanding of our own strengths and weaknesses and then be able to explain them to others. **Teacher Demonstration: ** • Pick one skill listed in the 3x3 table. Look around the class for someone who has that skill. • Approach the learner and tell them “I think you have this skill, because…” • Ask the learner to sign their name in the relevant box on your sheet. • Ask the learner to record the same skill in the 3x2 table at the bottom of their page. They have now “collected a skill / compliment”. Learners should now do the same, mixing with others in the group, paying them compliments by telling them what skills they have noticed. Each learner records the skills they have collected, potentially building confidence and self-awareness. Teacher notes: • Promote positive relationship building, build confidence by getting each learner noticed and encourage social etiquette in responding to compliments. • Encourage participation, aiming for the first to get 3 in a row, full house etc. • If some learners are not getting matches, lead the activity by reading out (or thinking of your own) skills and giving all learners the chance to claim them. The activity continues until one person has 6-9 different names on their sheet and all learners have 6 of their own skills identified. Extension activity: Develop employability vocabulary e.g. Do you know a better word for “being on time?” Follow up activity: Start or build on own CV by downloading and editing a skills-based-cv-template.
Social Story: First day at College
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Social Story: First day at College

(0)
This powerpoint is designed to give reassurance to learners who are feeling anxious on their first day of college. It was designed with autistic learners in mind but would work for others with anxiety and barriers to learning. The document can be edited to insert names of specific staff in departments. Some learners may benefit from including photographs too.
Behaviour as Communication
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Behaviour as Communication

(0)
Here is a powerpoint, with activities that help to illustrate that behaviour that challenges us is actually trying to communicate with us. It may not be doing it in the best way possible but it is trying to say something, perhaps “I can’t cope”, “Leave me alone” or “stop”. The powerpoint is accompanied by the stress bucket worksheet. If you are not aware of the stress bucket, it is explained nicely here. https://youtu.be/1KYC5SsJjx8 The powerpoint is also accompanied by the ‘behaviour analysis cards’. Both of which can be used independently. The cards with red arrows indicate possible triggers for challengeing behaviour, The speech bubbles provide suggestions as to what the behaviour may be ‘saying’ and the cards with green arrows provide suggestions as to what we or the individual can do to manage challenges more successfully.
Behaviour Analysis Cards
SpectrumSavvySpectrumSavvy

Behaviour Analysis Cards

(0)
This powerpoint is intented to be printed off as cards, e.g. 6 slides per page. It was created for a training session (Behaviour as Communication: Powerpoint available), but could also be used to help an individual understand their own behaviour. Feel free to add additional slides so that they are more suited to your circumstances. This was created with autism in mind, however I have recently made a new version with ADHD in mind to help a young person understand his triggers to be used over the next few weeks. The red arrow slides are to be used first, perhaps with a particular behaviour or ‘incident in mind’. Ask staff or the learner / child what was bothering them before the incident happens / happened. Select all cards that apply. e.g. I couldn’t do the work, it was too hard, I felt embarrassed. The speech bubble cards are to help identify what the behaviour was saying. e.g. when I punched the wall, I felt stupid, I had had enough. The green arrow cards are for the learner or staff to identify what would start to improve the situation, either proactively or reactively. You can then go on to replace the behaviour that challenges by teaching alternative behaviours or communication and assertiveness techniques. e.g. Code words to ask for help or assertiveness scripts such as “when…I feel… I need…”.